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Snipe problem

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Forum topic by littleladywoodshop posted 11-22-2014 06:05 PM 948 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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littleladywoodshop

49 posts in 778 days


11-22-2014 06:05 PM

Hello lumber jocks, I need advice with a problem with my Ridgid planner. When planning hardwoods I am getting a lot of snipe. I am wondering if it is something I am doing wrong or if it’s the tool. I don’t have as much snipe when planning softwood like cedar or pine.

If it’s the tool I don’t know what to adjust to stop it.
Any advice would be deeply appreciated.

-- Fail to plan and you are planning to fail. Ben Franklin


11 replies so far

View jap's profile

jap

1251 posts in 1520 days


#1 posted 11-22-2014 06:50 PM

It’s fairly normal/common. Do a quick search on the forum.

-- Joel

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littleladywoodshop

49 posts in 778 days


#2 posted 11-22-2014 06:57 PM

Thanks Joel. I’ll check the forum.

-- Fail to plan and you are planning to fail. Ben Franklin

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ElChe

630 posts in 803 days


#3 posted 11-23-2014 04:52 AM

Snipe at front as board goes in or at back as board comes out? Usually snipe is the board lifting into the cutterhead as it hits the cutter head (front) or as it leaves the cutter head (back). Both can be minimized by better support of the board. As the board goes in until it is adequately supported by the feed rollers the board can lift into the cutter head. And as the board is leaving the cutter head it may dip the back end into the cutter head. My fix for the front end snipe is to lightly keep pressure up on the back of the board to keep it flat against the table until the board hits the out feed roller.

Similar fix on the back end. As the board clears the indeed roller I apply slight pressure up on the front of board until it clears the cutter head. Not very elegant. Oh, for back end snipe if you have multiple boards you can minimize snipe by running the boards tight end to end. Then for the last board I use the slight pressure up to make sure the back of board doesn’t lift into the cutter head. Sorry for being so verbose.

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

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ElChe

630 posts in 803 days


#4 posted 11-23-2014 04:56 AM

If you lengthen the infeed and out feed support wings is really the way to go but I don’t have that kind of space. This is all assuming that your infeed and outfeed wings are set level with the planer table! Tilted wings will also cause snipe. Get your straight edge out. :)

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

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ElChe

630 posts in 803 days


#5 posted 11-23-2014 06:43 AM

Last two things. If you set the indeed and out feed support wings just a tad high at the ends away from the planer that can also help. Finally … Black magic with some chanting and incantations has reportedly been successful.

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8260 posts in 2895 days


#6 posted 11-23-2014 01:39 PM

Go to a big box store and get an 8’ length of laminate covered shelving. Cut it into two 4’ lengths. Lay one length on the planer bed (half on each side) and mark where the infeed table is. Attach a 3/4 X 3/4 X 12 stop at that point.
That will eliminate most of the snipe.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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littleladywoodshop

49 posts in 778 days


#7 posted 11-23-2014 07:53 PM

Thanks ElChe, I’ve tried the chanting but some would consider is ranting. I’ll try the support ideas mentioned above. I have the planer on a stand that I built so putting it on the workbench with some supports should do the trick. I sure do appreciate all the feedback.

-- Fail to plan and you are planning to fail. Ben Franklin

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3025 posts in 1264 days


#8 posted 11-23-2014 07:58 PM

Tom, is right. I have the Ridgid planer, and adjusting the infeed and outfeed tables to dead flat is a recipe for snipe—doesn’t make any sense to me. The Ridgid directions call for dead flat as well, but you’ve seen what that looks like.

You can experiment with a piece of scrap—adjust both of them up a bit and see what you get. You can get it set so that, in most cases, you have no snipe or at most a stripe with an almost imperceptible bit of snipe. I use roller stands for longer pieces of wood. I’m sure setting up more permanent, long tables is ideal, but you can deal with most of the snipe with adjustments to the tables and roller stands.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View russde's profile

russde

97 posts in 2306 days


#9 posted 11-24-2014 12:28 AM



Attach a 3/4 X 3/4 X 12 stop at that point.
- Gene Howe

Gene, I followed the first part, but not this part…what is a ‘3/4×3/4×12 stop’ ?
R

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2417 posts in 2388 days


#10 posted 11-24-2014 12:34 PM



.... If you set the indeed and out feed support wings just a tad high at the ends away from the planer that can also help…. – ElChe

To convince yourself of this: lift the end of the board as it enters the planer and again as it exits the planer. You will see the snipe disappear. Adjust the in-feed and out-feed tables to do this automatically each time. This adjustment should eliminate snipe.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8260 posts in 2895 days


#11 posted 11-24-2014 01:17 PM

Those shelving boards are laminated on both sides. They are fairly slick. That “stop” keeps the board from sliding with the work by contacting the edge of the infeed table. I screwed on a 3/4X3/4 because that’s what I had on hand. The 12” length matches the width of the bed and the width of the shelving board….well, close anyway.
Oh, BTW, Wax the board just as if it were the tables.

Attach a 3/4 X 3/4 X 12 stop at that point.
- Gene Howe

Gene, I followed the first part, but not this part…what is a 3/4×3/4×12 stop ?
R

- russde


-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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