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Repairing dents in finished wood.

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Forum topic by ShawnSpencer posted 11-19-2014 01:34 PM 1047 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ShawnSpencer

81 posts in 1002 days


11-19-2014 01:34 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question oak refurbishing finishing

I have a bunch of dents in a finished bench seat and need some help on how to proceed. I’m really trying to avoid sanding it all down and starting fresh. They are pretty deep though. I was thinking use an iron, then wet sand, and put down another coat of arm r seal. Anything you guys could recommend would help. Im not opposed to filling the dents with something. They are small but deep. The finish is Watco Danish oil with an arm r seal top coat of that helps.

-- I know you know...


7 replies so far

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CharlesA

3018 posts in 1258 days


#1 posted 11-19-2014 01:43 PM

I’ll let folks with more expertise give advise, but my guess is that your combination of small and deep is the hardest to deal with in terms of coaxing the wood back in shape with moisture and heat. Bummer. Hope you find a good solution.

What type/color of wood is it? if you have to fill them, I wonder if a colored filler, like TimberMate, or a clear filler, like Aqua Coat or even epoxy would be better. I’ve used clear, tinted, and sawdust filled epoxy in knot holes with pretty good results, depends on the tone of the wood and the size of the hole. In smaller holes, I like sawdust plus epoxy because it almost disappears. In big knotholes that are noticeable no matter what, I’ve used both clear and black tinted epoxy (i just added a little ebony stain), and it looked great.

If you fill them, the hardest part will be cleaning up the filler without requiring re-sanding and finishing the entire top.

Just throwing ideas out.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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ShawnSpencer

81 posts in 1002 days


#2 posted 11-19-2014 01:54 PM

It’s red oak. The watco makes it a little more brown than the traditional golden oak color. I’m not looking for perfection. It doesn’t look terrible but a raking light or touching really exposes the dents. A clear filler could work. Any products you recommend? I would be scared to use epoxy. Might need to research that some.

-- I know you know...

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distrbd

2227 posts in 1907 days


#3 posted 11-19-2014 02:03 PM

There’s a few youtube videos on removing dents using heat,fillers,etc.here’s a good one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XvKfeuX2EfQ

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

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CharlesA

3018 posts in 1258 days


#4 posted 11-19-2014 02:16 PM

If you haven’t used much epoxy, it can be a bit intimidating, but it’s really not that hard. Get a decent 5 minute epoxy (I use something like this). In critical applications, having an identical amount of epoxy and hardener is vital. For hole filling, I squirt out pretty close approximations, but don’t obsess over it.

1) I tape over the area to be filled as precisely as possible.
2) have handy tint or sawdust.
3) squirt out 2 parts on a piece of scrapwood.
4) use a thin piece of scrap to mix together epoxy and any additive
5) fill the hole. Epoxy doesn’t shrink, I don’t believe, so I try to get it as level as possible, erring on the proud side.
6) epoxy sands down easily, so I sand it, and put finish over it.

If you can find a way to draw these dents into line using moisture, heat, etc., that would be best. i just doubt it in your case. I’m no finishing expert, so if I can use epoxy, anyone can. But there may be better options out there.

Maybe take a scrap piece of oak, make dents in it, and experiment. The advantage of a clear filler like epoxy or aqua coat is that, especially with a small dent, you don’t have to worry about the tone and it wont be that noticeable, I don’t think.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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ShawnSpencer

81 posts in 1002 days


#5 posted 11-19-2014 09:53 PM

The iron got them out mostly. There are still a few dents though. I’m leaning towards the Aqua coat and then one more coat of arm r seal. Does anyone prefer crystalac to aqua coat? I have not worked with either.

-- I know you know...

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buildingmonkey

242 posts in 1008 days


#6 posted 11-25-2014 12:36 PM

When I was in junior high school, 50 years ago, we used a soldering iron, hot, and a wet rag. Put the wet rag on the dent and put the hot iron on the wet rag. The hot steam raises the dent.

-- Jim from Kansas

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ShawnSpencer

81 posts in 1002 days


#7 posted 11-25-2014 01:07 PM

Aquacoat is in the mail. I’ll update the post with some pics once it comes in.

-- I know you know...

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