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Forum topic by FuseCraft posted 11-18-2014 05:24 PM 2998 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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FuseCraft

16 posts in 964 days


11-18-2014 05:24 PM

Hi All, I’m looking for a way to create a safe space for me to work on small projects in my basement. The only room available to me is where the furnace and hot water heater are so I’ve been unable to do anything for fear of saw dust exploding.

Now that the winter is coming, working in my yard (garage is not an option) is out of the question.

Has anyone worked with a tabletop dust collector? Any success/recommendations? I’d just like to be able to do some sanding and basic cutting without fear of losing my eyebrows.

Thanks Lumberjocks!


11 replies so far

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3555 posts in 1235 days


#1 posted 11-18-2014 05:32 PM

Hi,
Saw dust does not explode.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2150 posts in 1640 days


#2 posted 11-18-2014 06:09 PM

You won’t get high enough dust concentrations to get a dust explosion.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View crank49's profile

crank49

3981 posts in 2438 days


#3 posted 11-18-2014 06:10 PM

“Hi,
Saw dust does not explode.

—earthartandfoods.com”

Yes it does.
I have been burned by it.
But, it does not explode easily. Conditions must be very specific.
A flash fire is easier to accomplish.

I assume your furnace and water heater are gas or oil fired for you to be concerned; you do have a source of open flame there. But, I have worked with a sander right in front of an un-vented radiant type gas heater with no problem.

I’d be more concerned with fumes from finishing. Would NOT be spraying lacquer, for instance.

A box fan with a 20” x 20” furnace filter duct taped to one side makes a quick and simple bench top dust filter and it works surprisingly well, especially in a small area.

Connecting a shop vacuum to your ROS sander will remove most of the dust before it gets into the air. Also will make the sandpaper last a lot longer.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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FuseCraft

16 posts in 964 days


#4 posted 11-18-2014 06:24 PM

Thanks for the feedback everyone. I’ll post a followup once I’m situated.

~ Chris

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BasementShop

69 posts in 768 days


#5 posted 11-18-2014 10:43 PM



A box fan with a 20” x 20” furnace filter duct taped to one side makes a quick and simple bench top dust filter and it works surprisingly well, especially in a small area.

I use a 20 by 20 box fan with a low grade furnace filter. I have it running behind my lathe and I’m very pleased with the results. I vacuum the filter with my shop vac rather than replace it. It has lasted a surprisingly long time. I built a frame around mine rather than using duct tape. But you will get good dust capture with the box fan.

Good luck!

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3555 posts in 1235 days


#6 posted 11-19-2014 12:39 AM

My apologies for being so short in my response; crank49 is correct, many dust items such as sawdust, grain dust, coal dust, cow or chicken manure dust and even certain metal dust such as aluminum (in the right conditions) have a potential to explode. However, using a hack saw to cut aluminum will pose as much danger of explosion as sanding a piece of wood by hand or machines. in the old days in the north east, coals was delivered right into you basement coal shoot with coal dust going everywhere. Think of it like this, you are cutting a 3” thick hard wood; running it slow over your table saw so as to not damage your blade or causing the circuit breaker to trip. Lets also assume that you have a dust collector which increases the air flow in an contained environment in which dust is rapidly moving in large volume and thus increasing the the oxygen flow. Now, turn on your table saw and look at the motor; the movements between the armature and bushes induce thousands of sparks per revolution. You can call this a perfect storm for a sawdust explosion; increased oxygen, increases sawdust accumulation and plenty of ignition. Yet, it never happens. Why, because the right conditions are not met. I started woodworking in the same environment as yours; in a basement next to a raging oil furnace. (disclaimer, if you get blown into pieces while hand sanding or machine sanding using an orbital sander(they too create sparks), I am not responsible, lol).

-- earthartandfoods.com

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1646 posts in 1784 days


#7 posted 11-19-2014 01:30 AM

I wouldn’t recommend a tabletop dust collector for this application. The cheaper ones tend to eject a lot of fine dust. A vacuum equipped with a HEPA filter would be my preference when working in a tight space. Specifically, a Festool or Fein model that won’t make ears ring.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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FuseCraft

16 posts in 964 days


#8 posted 11-19-2014 12:59 PM

Thanks for taking the time to elaborate on your initial response. I release you from all liability…here goes nothin!


My apologies for being so short in my response; crank49 is correct, many dust items such as sawdust, grain dust, coal dust, cow or chicken manure dust and even certain metal dust such as aluminum (in the right conditions) have a potential to explode. However, using a hack saw to cut aluminum will pose as much danger of explosion as sanding a piece of wood by hand or machines. in the old days in the north east, coals was delivered right into you basement coal shoot with coal dust going everywhere. Think of it like this, you are cutting a 3” thick hard wood; running it slow over your table saw so as to not damage your blade or causing the circuit breaker to trip. Lets also assume that you have a dust collector which increases the air flow in an contained environment in which dust is rapidly moving in large volume and thus increasing the the oxygen flow. Now, turn on your table saw and look at the motor; the movements between the armature and bushes induce thousands of sparks per revolution. You can call this a perfect storm for a sawdust explosion; increased oxygen, increases sawdust accumulation and plenty of ignition. Yet, it never happens. Why, because the right conditions are not met. I started woodworking in the same environment as yours; in a basement next to a raging oil furnace. (disclaimer, if you get blown into pieces while hand sanding or machine sanding using an orbital sander(they too create sparks), I am not responsible, lol).

- mrjinx007


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jshroyer

80 posts in 1126 days


#9 posted 11-19-2014 02:01 PM

I have the same situation. i use a shopvac with the bag and a HEPA filter for most dust. I also use good HVAC filters for my place to try to make sure i dont fill the rest of the place with dust. THen i also put up a plastic sheet around the my space to help separate it a little more from everything else. that does a lot to help. you can filter air all you want but if it doesnt move then you have a dirty zone and a clean zone.

-- http://semiww.org/

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benchbuilder

266 posts in 1918 days


#10 posted 11-19-2014 03:32 PM

Hi fuse, try using a 6 or 8” flexable furnace duck with a small fan attached and set it near your cutting or sanding to vent the dust out a window or hole in the wall. Just remove a window pain in the basement window and put the flexable duck through it and seal around it. You dont lose much heat and still get rid of a lot of dust.

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daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1042 days


#11 posted 11-21-2014 06:27 PM

you’ll need to change your furnace filters.when your sanding often.

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