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Forum topic by SoonerMike posted 11-14-2014 09:28 PM 1320 views 1 time favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SoonerMike

14 posts in 780 days


11-14-2014 09:28 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question arduino cnc straightening wood

I’m using my Arduino to make a simple CNC setup. My current setup is made from cardboard and hangs from my whiteboard, and helps me plot. I’m going to be making one from wood, and I’d like to know how I can make wooden rails that stay fairly straight. I was thinking of making a sandwich, or some fancy shape to keep it stable. Due to budgets, I’ll have to use basic lumber from Lowes or something and rip it on my table saw and glue/screw it together. That’s about all I’m capable of right now. Any help would be much appreciated?

-Mike

-- I'm pretty sure this'll work.


16 replies so far

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SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3050 days


#1 posted 11-14-2014 09:37 PM

I would surely stick with the cardboard that’s how everyone else here made their cnc masterpieces.I assume this is a JOKE after all.Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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Mark Shymanski

5314 posts in 3178 days


#2 posted 11-14-2014 10:42 PM

I don’t think Mike is joking but asking a pretty good question. As I understand it he has a CNC that he prototyped out of basic materials and is using it to draw things on a white board. A pretty clever approach to learning how to get an Arduino to do what you need it to do. Mike then goes on to ask how he could build a more robust version now that (presumably) his prototype solved enough questions for him that the is ready to step up his game.

Mike I am not sure how big you are building this but you may want to explore the use of 1) Baltic birch plywood, 2) hardwoods such as maple or oak and 3) check out some of the stuff that Mathais Wandel has done on his Woodgears website for inspiration in building machines in wood. If you haven’t already you may want to check out the projects section here as I believe a number of LJs have built CNC machines. Blog the process and I am sure the folks here that have actually build CNC machines may be able to chime in with some useful comments. Looking forward to seeing progress pictures!

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

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JAAune

1644 posts in 1782 days


#3 posted 11-14-2014 11:03 PM

Laminations are an excellent way to minimize warping. An alternative is to attempt stabilization using Cactus Juice or some similar agent.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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SoonerMike

14 posts in 780 days


#4 posted 11-18-2014 01:26 PM

Yeah, you’d think I was joking on this, and I do joke around a lot, but not when it comes to cardboard. That’s some very serious business. lol. Cardboard is a terrific prototyping material because it’s cheap, easy to work with, and fairly strong. I’ve built victorious boats, shelving, foam cutters, artwork, windmills, and all sorts of stuff from cardboard. If needed, I then convert to something more permanent.

Thanks guys. -Mike

-- I'm pretty sure this'll work.

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ChuckC

821 posts in 2400 days


#5 posted 11-18-2014 01:53 PM

Check out the JGRO design on cnczone.com. I have one on my projects page. It wasn’t that hard to make and remarkably accurate considering what it’s made from.

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SoonerMike

14 posts in 780 days


#6 posted 11-18-2014 02:04 PM

Thanks Chuck! That thing is really neat.

-- I'm pretty sure this'll work.

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brtech

903 posts in 2388 days


#7 posted 11-18-2014 03:47 PM

Also consider torsion box construction. Use 1/4” ply. You can get flat, square, strong and lightweight beams out of that. Consider that for the cross beam at least.

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Mike

406 posts in 2152 days


#8 posted 11-18-2014 04:08 PM

How about using drawer rails and channel track? The BBS have tones of the stuff. People use the rails from shower doors all the time.

-- look Ma! I still got all eleven of my fingers! - http://www.lepelstatcrafts.etsy.com - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCppWfrYGXCr5lm9uW-Fpqqw

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ChuckC

821 posts in 2400 days


#9 posted 11-18-2014 04:20 PM

^^ There is way too much lateral movement in draw slides for a cnc. One of the cheapest ways to go is gas pipe and bearings.

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oldnovice

5730 posts in 2833 days


#10 posted 11-18-2014 04:31 PM

SoonerMike, do you mean corrugated board or cardboard?

I ask this because for a number of years I supported automation in corrugated board manufacturing and they prefer, and are downright adament, that their product is NOT cardboard.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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SoonerMike

14 posts in 780 days


#11 posted 11-18-2014 04:35 PM

Wow! I love all the suggestions. oldnovice, I use corrugated cardboard for all my prototypes. You know, the kind of stuff boxes are made from? That’s what I consider cardboard, except I buy mine in 4×8 sheets so it’s consistent.

-- I'm pretty sure this'll work.

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brtech

903 posts in 2388 days


#12 posted 11-18-2014 05:18 PM

Do you know about this stuff:
http://openbuildspartstore.com/

It’s so cheap, you might reconsider wood. Depends on how big you want to make your CNC.

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ChadRat6458

78 posts in 820 days


#13 posted 11-19-2014 02:00 PM

Mike, I am in Piedmont, Ok. I have a mig welder if you want to use steel. I am interested in CNC routing. Doing research on the best way to go. The Joe’s hybrid setup looks good. Let me know if I can help.

Chad

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oldnovice

5730 posts in 2833 days


#14 posted 11-19-2014 08:04 PM

SoonerMike, do you realize that by bonding two sheets at right angles to another sheet provides a very strong sheet of material. By adding more layers you can make some really strong material!

In fact, here is a video of a bicycle made from corrugated board

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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SoonerMike

14 posts in 780 days


#15 posted 11-19-2014 08:15 PM

Old Novice: I regularly make my own “plyboard” by gluing sheets at 90 degrees. That bicycle is awesome! I’d call that a honey comb panel, but I see now what you mean by corrugated board. I started using cardboard because corrugated board wasn’t legal for the boat competitions.

-- I'm pretty sure this'll work.

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