LumberJocks

Anybody tried the $60 HF drill press

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by shipwright posted 11-14-2014 09:17 PM 2181 views 0 times favorited 36 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7175 posts in 2266 days


11-14-2014 09:17 PM

I need a small, cheap drill press for square drilling of veneer packets. The only reason that I haven’t bought one of these HF ones before is that the chuck is less than a precision grind and I need to grip #74 drill bits. I just ordered some carbide bits that have 1/8” shanks so that problem should be gone. I’m just wondering if anyone has any other complaints about them before I blow my life savings on one.
(I will be taking a 1/8” bit with me to make sure the one I get will actually clamp it.)

Thanks in advance.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/


36 replies so far

View Sodabowski's profile

Sodabowski

2308 posts in 2301 days


#1 posted 11-14-2014 09:27 PM

Paul, why not invest in a cheap auxiliary mandrel? these come in all flavours, I like those with a standard 1/4” hex shank, but the round ones are okay too. You can put very small bits in these :

http://www.ebay.fr/itm/Micro-small-pin-chuck-vice-HOLDS-VERY-TINY-DRILLS-BURRS-tools-3-collets-0-2-5m-/191059606795?pt=UK_Home_Garden_PowerTools_SM&hash=item2c7c0a3d0b

-- Thomas - Pondering the inclusion of woodworking into physics and chemistry classes...

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

9451 posts in 3520 days


#2 posted 11-14-2014 09:29 PM

I have been using one for years… No problem with 1/8” bits!

The only problem I have had is it’s flimsy Depth-Stop adjustment…
... other than that, works OK for me…

I don’t know how it handles Metal… I have only used it for wood, plastic, etc.

Once in awhile, they have them on sale & you can get them for $50…

For those really small bits, you can always get a little chuck from Lee Valley that you can put into the DP and then put the small bits into the chuck…

Have fun,
Joe

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7175 posts in 2266 days


#3 posted 11-14-2014 09:31 PM

I actually have one of those already Thomas. I was planning to buy this DP this year anyway, before I found the carbide bits …... as long as no one has any deal breaker complaints.

Thanks

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View RogerBean's profile

RogerBean

1602 posts in 2421 days


#4 posted 11-14-2014 09:31 PM

HI Paul,
My greatest concern with the inexpensive DP’s is the quality of the chuck. I’ve seen many with very visible wobble or runout. Might have to kiss a few different frogs to find a prince in the inventory. Of course you could replace the chuck with something better, but then, it’s no longer $60.
Roger

-- "Everybody makes mistakes. A craftsman always fixes them." (Monty Kennedy, "The Checkering and Carving of Gunstocks", 1952)

View bandit571's profile (online now)

bandit571

14659 posts in 2151 days


#5 posted 11-14-2014 09:42 PM

Bought a $70 5 speed at H-F years ago, no problems other than it was missing a set screw in a drive pulley. Fixed that for a whoppingly expensive $0.49+tax

Have been drilling wood/metal ever since.

Chuck IS a Jacobs chuck, came with the drill press BTW

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View JoeMcGlynn's profile

JoeMcGlynn

219 posts in 1821 days


#6 posted 11-14-2014 10:02 PM

It’s probably OK, but besides the ability of the chuck to grip a small bit (which you’ve solved) I’d think about run out too. That could be a problem with a small carbide drill. Most likely it’s OK though.

A fall back is either an add-on chuck like above, or just replace the chuck on the machine with a smaller precision Jacobs chuck…although that might cost more then the HF drill press by itself.

-- Blog: http://mcglynnonmaking.wordpress.com/

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1646 posts in 1784 days


#7 posted 11-14-2014 10:40 PM

We’ve got two of them that were purchased over a year ago to hold branding irons. The quills have a lot of slop and even with plenty of fiddling, they still wobble too much on the down-stroke. I’d never use them for drilling holes but they’re serviceable for branding (though barely).

I’d spend an extra $25 and get one with slightly better quality control.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7175 posts in 2266 days


#8 posted 11-14-2014 10:52 PM

Thanks for the replies everyone. I think I’ll go in, check the chuck, check the quill for wiggle and make my decision. Small and cheap are the main factors as I don’t have much space and I have my ShopSmith which is a great drill press. As long as this can drill holes less than a degree or two off square, it will likely do. If not, I’ve never had a problem with a return at HF.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View jmartel's profile (online now)

jmartel

6579 posts in 1618 days


#9 posted 11-14-2014 11:02 PM

Those 5 speed drill presses get some pretty good reviews for the price. I have the 12 speed benchtop from HF. It does ok, but has some runout/wobble. It has a bigger motor than the 5 speed, and it still bogs down on occasion. For 1/8” bits, you should be fine. Keep in mind that it has a pretty small depth that it can reach to in the center of a packet. I think 5” maybe?

My benchtop will be replaced with a floor model with a longer quill travel in the future, but for now it works.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1646 posts in 1784 days


#10 posted 11-14-2014 11:05 PM

The little ones we purchased have a 3” stroke.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View jmartel's profile (online now)

jmartel

6579 posts in 1618 days


#11 posted 11-14-2014 11:14 PM

I was referring to the distance from the center of the bit to the post. In this case, it’s 4” for the model Paul is talking about. Stroke is only 2”.

http://www.harborfreight.com/8-in-bench-mount-drill-press-5-speed-60238.html

This is the model I have

http://www.harborfreight.com/10-in-bench-mount-drill-press-12-speed-60237.html

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View InstantSiv's profile

InstantSiv

259 posts in 1063 days


#12 posted 11-14-2014 11:22 PM

I have 2. If you’re not expecting much from them they are an amazing value.

Only thing that concerns me though is that 5+ minutes on the older version(pre-light) and the motor will get very hot. Haven’t really run the newer version that long so I don’t know if it has the same issue.

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1646 posts in 1784 days


#13 posted 11-14-2014 11:37 PM

Throat distance you mean? Yes, I’d forgotten how small that is.

There’s something to be said for just making a guide block out of a piece of hardwood then setting that on top of the material to be drilled. I’ve done some very straight holes with that technique on all sorts of items that wouldn’t fit on the drill press.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7175 posts in 2266 days


#14 posted 11-14-2014 11:43 PM

Quill travel isn’t important to me. 1” would do. Power, same thing. The drill bit is .0225”.
The throat capacity however could be a deal breaker. Thanks for pointing that out Jeff.

As for a guide block, the exposed drill length here is maybe an inch and the packet can be very nearly that thick.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7175 posts in 2266 days


#15 posted 11-14-2014 11:52 PM

This is what I’m using right now.

With all it’s wobbling it is almost good enough. It can however make a hole in the centre of a very large piece.
I’m thinking if I shorten the post and cut the centre out of the base, I may end up with a more accurate One of the above.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

showing 1 through 15 of 36 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com