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Continuous grain box design and stock thickness problem?

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Forum topic by ShawnSpencer posted 11-14-2014 04:45 PM 956 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ShawnSpencer

81 posts in 1005 days


11-14-2014 04:45 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question cherry

I am currently designing a continuous grain box. The stock I have is some 3/4 gummy cherry. The problem I am running into is to resaw the stock to give me the continuous grain flow is going to leave me with some pretty thin boards. This leaves me with two options it seems. Leave the boards 3/4 and let the grain have a stoping point or resawing and glueing up some cherry on the inside face to get a little bit thicker board. Is there another way to do this that I am missing or which path would you choose? This project will be a keepsake box that I will glue up and the cut off the top. Because of that design the second option of glueing up for thickness is giving me some concessions. I am worried the glue joint might be obvious on the top. The dimensions will be 6” tall, 7.5” deep, and 12” wide. Thank you for any replys or advice.

-- I know you know...


7 replies so far

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jmartel

6569 posts in 1613 days


#1 posted 11-14-2014 04:55 PM

If you wanted to not have the glue line on the top, you could always miter the top so you would have a 3 way miter on each corner.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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NoThanks

798 posts in 992 days


#2 posted 11-14-2014 05:22 PM

Option 3
If this is going to be a keepsake box then go buy (since the cost for such a small box would be minimal) more wood that is thicker so you can resaw to what you want.

-- Because I'm gone, that's why!

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ShawnSpencer

81 posts in 1005 days


#3 posted 11-14-2014 05:59 PM

I like this mitered top idea. I also thought using routed edge detail on the top might could help hide it or maybe a contrasting wood laminated on the inside and just make the joint obvious. As for option 3, thank you for your input. This is the best way to do it but, I need to use what I have and I am determined to find a creative and successful solution.

-- I know you know...

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bondogaposis

4028 posts in 1814 days


#4 posted 11-14-2014 06:42 PM

I think that for a box that small that 3/4” will be too thick and look out of proportion. If you resaw and plane down to 1/4” thick it will look a lot better. A lot of boxes have been made w/ 1/4” stock, I don’t see why that would be a problem.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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ShawnSpencer

81 posts in 1005 days


#5 posted 11-14-2014 06:53 PM


I think that for a box that small that 3/4” will be too thick and look out of proportion. If you resaw and plane down to 1/4” thick it will look a lot better. A lot of boxes have been made w/ 1/4” stock, I don t see why that would be a problem.

- bondogaposis

How deep are your rabbets and dados? I have been making up a plan in illustrator and experimenting with the thinner stock. It seems the grooves would be pretty shallow.

-- I know you know...

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bondogaposis

4028 posts in 1814 days


#6 posted 11-14-2014 07:14 PM

How deep are your rabbets and dados?

Dadoes and rabbets should be 1/2 the stock thickness or less. A scant 1/8” on 1/4” stock would be about right for a small box.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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ShawnSpencer

81 posts in 1005 days


#7 posted 12-17-2014 05:29 PM

I have resawn the cherry. Now that I have the boards seperated I am noticing the grain runs diagonaly through the thickness of the original board. To get the grain for flow across the box it looks like I have to offset a couple sides to get the grain to matchup. This will casue me to loose some of the height of my sides. Is this common? The tutorials I have seen are pretty basic. Resaw, then cut the sides. It comes out with a perfect grain match.

-- I know you know...

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