LumberJocks

RIKON 18" BANDSAW & Stabilizer

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Alex101 posted 11-14-2014 04:37 PM 1239 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Alex101's profile

Alex101

18 posts in 846 days


11-14-2014 04:37 PM

RIKON 18” Bandsaw. Does anyone have this machine and use it with a Carter Stabilizer RIK2.

If so, I would like to know what movement there is from side to side in mm with the bearing wheel.

Thanks

-- I like to keep busy - http://www.badgerwoodcrafters.co.uk


9 replies so far

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1114 posts in 2412 days


#1 posted 11-19-2014 03:05 PM

I use my Stabilizer on my Powermatic and love it. I haven’t noted any side play and it runs in my saw unless I have to do some resawing.

Just as videos show, you can cut a block of wood and pull the cut piece out from either side. That’s pretty straight.

Turn radius is reduced on all cuts (do the usual grind on the back edges).

Since you don’t use the lower bearings, the blade twists and turns when turning on a cut.

View Alex101's profile

Alex101

18 posts in 846 days


#2 posted 11-19-2014 03:36 PM

Thanks Kelly.

I am about to order one which should fit. Can you say how much the bearing wheel on the stabiliser can move side to side in order to fit the blade. Just thinking the bearing slot and the blade may not line up and would like to know how much variation there would be if needed?

-- I like to keep busy - http://www.badgerwoodcrafters.co.uk

View blackcherry's profile

blackcherry

3317 posts in 3291 days


#3 posted 11-19-2014 08:52 PM

The side bearing should be set as to not touch the blade and just behind the gullet of the band saw blade. Set the side bearing as close to the bade as possible than rotate the wheel if the bearing move manually your to close and need to move them wider. The back bearing should only move while cutting since your applying pressure on the blade back towards the bearing.

View Alex101's profile

Alex101

18 posts in 846 days


#4 posted 11-19-2014 10:20 PM

Hi Blackberry,

I appreciate your good meaning, but you are discribing the normal position of blade guides and rear thruster bearings and NOT the position of a stabilizer. That is designed to be pressed against the rear of the blade and in fact pushed forward to ‘spring load’ the blade and only secure the rear of the blade to run permantly in the groove of the bearing. When positioned to push against the blade rear, it then requires that the rear adjustment of blade position be moved back in order for the blade to run in the centre of the upper wheel and ensure the blade is still verticle.

I think you misunderstood the questioon, but this video will help you understand https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGbZqWac0jU

I have not used a stabilizer before, but ordered one from Carter Products today and was curious as to how much ‘sideways’ movement there was with the bearing wheel, as it is adustable.

Perhaps the video may help you a little with bandsaw tune up, as Alex Snodgras is very good indeed.
Cheers for now.

-- I like to keep busy - http://www.badgerwoodcrafters.co.uk

View blackcherry's profile

blackcherry

3317 posts in 3291 days


#5 posted 11-20-2014 12:10 AM

My bad Alex, I’ve change this unit out way to many time and was visualizing the set up for re-sawing guides. I’ve learn over the years as not to over load the blade in the guide slot of the stabilizer because it cause stress on the weld joint of the blade, after snapping a couple of blade at the weld you really only need to lightly press it to rest in the slot. I’ve made plenty of band saw boxes over the years and you know when you have the right setting is when you see no burn marks on either side of the cut out.

View Alex101's profile

Alex101

18 posts in 846 days


#6 posted 11-20-2014 06:13 AM

Hi Blackcherry

You do make a good point about over stressing the blade and I will take care when I receive the stabilizer from Carter Products. I may also hve a wod with the guy who makesthe blade, as he may be aware of such a problem.

What size blades have you used with stailizer and do you find any particular one better than the others?

You certainly make some nice boxes and although I have not made that particular design, it is one I will have a go at.
Cheers for now

-- I like to keep busy - http://www.badgerwoodcrafters.co.uk

View blackcherry's profile

blackcherry

3317 posts in 3291 days


#7 posted 11-20-2014 02:36 PM

Alex 101 I’ve used Timber Wolf blades, the stabilizer is for only 1/4 blades and smaller. My preferred blade is 3/16 4tpi which has work for me flawlessly in recent applications. The blade can take extreme tight curves and back out with little if any resistance. The stabilizer will take your work to another dimension in working with your band saw, have a blast looking forward in seeing your projects….Blkcherry

View Alex101's profile

Alex101

18 posts in 846 days


#8 posted 11-20-2014 02:47 PM

Blkcherry,
many thanks. I have tended to work more with the 1/4”, but do have a 3/16 and will get a couple more (just in case) I have been pondering on the Carter Stabilizer since last August, but was quoted a high shipping cost ($79), although now they have quoted $25 by US postal service, which I have accepted. I have also ordered an additional bearing wheel to be on the safe side.

Really looking forward to tighter turns, as it is one of the problems with some boxes. I will let you know how I get on.

Cheers for now.

-- I like to keep busy - http://www.badgerwoodcrafters.co.uk

View Alex101's profile

Alex101

18 posts in 846 days


#9 posted 12-08-2014 04:18 PM

Just an update. The Stabilizer arrived on Friday and is a real peach with the 1/8” blade I have. I just cut three bandsaw boxed from the remains of the drawer inserts from other boxes and very leased ith howfine it cuts and the tight turns.

It was the RICON RIK2 which was used and I have done a review.

The first job was to see if it would actually fit, so I took off the BS400 top guide unit and backed off the lower guides and thrust bearing well away from the 1/4” blade that was in situ at the time. The new unit would not fit on the existing upper guide support bar, due to the fact that the bottom of the blade guard was a touch to long.
Removal of the blade guide was simply removal of the two hex bolts holding it in place and manoeuvring it out around the blade. It only required removal of a small section of the blade guard, by the trusty/rusty hacksaw, to enable the blade guard to be refitted and the Stabilizer would then fit.

FETTLING A small instruction card comes with the Stabilizer and is adequate. It suggests you remove the blade before removing the top guides and backing off the lower guides and thrust bearing. I found that it was best not to have the Stabilizer in place at all to start with when positioning your blade, because on this machine, there is very little space between the stabilizer and the blade and it is important not to make contact with the bearing before loading.

You need to ensure that the smaller blade will run with the lower part of the gullet in the centre of the upper wheel. Set this by hand with the machine unplugged, and then run the machine on power before finishing the blade setting.
I have found it easier t set the blade position by having a 3” engineering square, suitably marked for the centre of the wheel, to place against the upper wheel edge. It’s easier and quicker that guessing the centre blade setting.

Once the blade is correctly positioned, fit the Stabilizer and ensure that the groove in the bearing wheel is in line with the blade, by loosening the hex screw allowing the bearing wheel to move sideways. Then tighten up when in line. From the blade being just touching in the groove, move the Stabilizer unit forward on the support shaft by 1/8” to ‘load’ the blade sufficiently so that it will sit there when running, then lock it off
See gap with stabilizer pushed forward

Moving the Stabilizer unit forward will have moved the blade forward on the top wheel and it will be necessary to adjust this back to centre, by turning the blade tracking knob clockwise.
On this I have a marked on the top (12 noon position) to indicate the 1/4” blade position centred correctly when free of any contact. When the stabilizer is ‘loaded’ against the blade, this will need to be moved clockwise from 12 noon to the 5pm position to move the blade back to centre when the 1/4” blade is being used.
When using the 1/8” blade, the free ‘unloaded’ position will be 4pm and the under pressure (loaded) it will be moved back clockwise to the 9pm position. These positions are on my bandsaw and may vary slightly between BS400 models, as will fitting a 3/16” blade, which have not yet used with this unit.
Finally, just check with a square, that the blade is vertical in both planes on the table and when cutting, the Stabilizer, should always be 1/4” above the work for best results. The fact that the blade is ‘loaded’ against the bearing, if you need to back out of a cut, it will be far easier than with normal guides.

Fisherman Terry Thomas always said – “Tight Lines”, so I’ll say ..........................................’ Tight Turns’.

Malcolm Alexander
December 2014

Hope that’s not oo long winded for you guys.
Cheers

-- I like to keep busy - http://www.badgerwoodcrafters.co.uk

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com