LumberJocks

Wee Cheatum & How Attorneys at law

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by rantingrich posted 11-14-2014 11:03 AM 2309 views 1 time favorited 54 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View rantingrich's profile

rantingrich

372 posts in 811 days


11-14-2014 11:03 AM

Topic tags/keywords: law

I thought I was dreaming…. BUT woke up in the middle of the night with the TV going and there was a INFOMERCIAL on that I though was one of of Ambulance chasing class action suits against Big Pharma or some sort of defective medical product or procedure…. NO

It was one of those Ambulance chasing Law firms wanted you to call them to see if you or a loved one were hurt injured or killed by a defective PRODUCT INDEED… But it wasn’t a drug or a medical apparatus they were going after.

It was to SUE manufactures, sellers and distributors of TABLE SAWS…...

YES that’s right. They saw TABLES saw are inherently DEFECTIVE, DANGEROUS and MUST PAY UP!

So look for table saws to completely disappear or cost so much none of us can afford them

-- Rich


54 replies so far

View altendky's profile

altendky

169 posts in 1676 days


#1 posted 11-14-2014 11:44 AM

Aside from the lawsuits by injured individuals (2010) it appears that SawStop is suing the industry (2014).

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

22033 posts in 1804 days


#2 posted 11-14-2014 11:45 AM

It’s a sign of the times. Protect us against ourselves.

Hate lawyers.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View rantingrich's profile

rantingrich

372 posts in 811 days


#3 posted 11-14-2014 11:49 AM

Buy your table saws while you can

-- Rich

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

1954 posts in 1454 days


#4 posted 11-14-2014 12:56 PM

Just for fairness and truth…the lawsuit that SawStop filed concerned a bunch of manufactures who had worked together to block the use of the SawStop technology on any other table saws. It was nothing about forcing anyone to use their technology or advocating that all saws must have the technology.

If you want you can follow the link in the first post and then to another link in that article which will give you the actual lawsuit.

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

22033 posts in 1804 days


#5 posted 11-14-2014 01:01 PM

Oops

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View Bill7255's profile

Bill7255

354 posts in 1750 days


#6 posted 11-14-2014 01:32 PM

That commercial is several years old. There have also been magazine adds saying the same thing.

-- Bill R

View Kaleb the Swede's profile

Kaleb the Swede

1731 posts in 1435 days


#7 posted 11-14-2014 01:34 PM

Uh oh…..a sawstop bomb was just set off. Here we go…...............

-- Just trying to build something beautiful

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

3187 posts in 2242 days


#8 posted 11-14-2014 01:40 PM

This lawsuit (in the link) is all about suing the manufactures that refused to incorporate SawStop technologies. I agree that table saws are dangerous and can cause damage if you are not careful. Looks like hand saws are coming back – good thing Distton and Atkins are out of business, they would probably be included – I have been cut by a dull handsaw more than once.

How about kitchen knives, there should be some kind of protection from the blade – more people are cut by them on a daily basis than table saws.

Nanny, Nanny state – we must protect us from everything – put them in a padded cell and protect us from them.

-- David in Damascus, MD

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

800 posts in 1574 days


#9 posted 11-14-2014 03:11 PM


This lawsuit (in the link) is all about suing the manufactures that refused to incorporate SawStop technologies. I agree that table saws are dangerous and can cause damage if you are not careful. Looks like hand saws are coming back – good thing Distton and Atkins are out of business, they would probably be included – I have been cut by a dull handsaw more than once.

How about kitchen knives, there should be some kind of protection from the blade – more people are cut by them on a daily basis than table saws.

There’s actually a pretty straightforward way to determine whether or not a particular safety device should be required from the perspective of economic efficiency (normative law and economics): if the cost of the device that prevents an injury is less than the probability of an injury multiplied by the monetary cost of the injury, it would be negligent not to install the device. See http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/bridge/LawEconomics/neg-liab.htm.

Kitchen knives are apples and oranges because there aren’t really viable additional safety features that could be added to a kitchen knife, and even if there were the marginal cost of the feature would need to be lower than the marginal benefit of the feature.

Speaking generally, even though kitchen knives cause more injuries than table saws (i.e., knives have a higher probability of injury), the cost of injury from a table saw is orders of magnitude above the cost of injury from a kitchen knife (i.e., knives have a lower cost of injury). What matters when looking at safety features and negligence is whether the cost of the feature exceeds the product of the risk and cost of injury.

Aside from the fact that there’s currently a patent (i.e., monopoly) driving up the price of the SawStop technology, there’s really no difference between requiring table saws to have a brake and requiring cars to have a seatbelt.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View longgone's profile

longgone

5688 posts in 2774 days


#10 posted 11-14-2014 03:45 PM

I added the new sawstop safety device to all of my kitchen knives and pocket knives. Putting them on the chisels this afternoon.

View InstantSiv's profile

InstantSiv

259 posts in 1061 days


#11 posted 11-14-2014 03:54 PM

From the article,

The suit says the conspiracy began in 2001 or 2002, but was not revealed until February, 2010, through testimony of a retired Ryobi official at a trial in Boston. The case involved a worker named Carlos Osorio, who had sued Ryobi after suffering severe hand injuries in a table saw accident, and won a $1.5 million judgment.

During the trial, David Peot, Ryobi’s former director of advanced technologies, testified that at meetings of the Power Tool Institute, officials had voiced concerns that the SawStop technology could expose them to greater legal liability. The fear was that “if another manufacturer were to develop a concept of improved table saw safety, then the manufacturers who don’t have that would certainly be at a disadvantage when it comes to product liability,” Peot said.

Earlier in the article it says 67,000 annual blade contacts. 67,000 x $1,000-$1.5 million(damages per) = a liability of around $75 million to $100 billion annually.

So they conspired to boycott a technology that could put them out of business.

It says later in the article,

In response to SawStop, five of the larger companies—including Black & Decker, Bosch and Ryobi—formed a joint venture to develop their own injury reduction system. The joint venture ended in 2009, when members said they had developed a safety system superior to SawStop’s, though they have yet to include it in a single saw.

hmm…

Anyways interesting stuff. Another interesting point was that the people at sawstop tried to license the tech but none of the companies wanted it. That’s what lead them to start manufacturing on their own.

View InstantSiv's profile

InstantSiv

259 posts in 1061 days


#12 posted 11-14-2014 04:03 PM

From the article,

The suit says the conspiracy began in 2001 or 2002, but was not revealed until February, 2010, through testimony of a retired Ryobi official at a trial in Boston. The case involved a worker named Carlos Osorio, who had sued Ryobi after suffering severe hand injuries in a table saw accident, and won a $1.5 million judgment.

During the trial, David Peot, Ryobi’s former director of advanced technologies, testified that at meetings of the Power Tool Institute, officials had voiced concerns that the SawStop technology could expose them to greater legal liability. The fear was that “if another manufacturer were to develop a concept of improved table saw safety, then the manufacturers who don’t have that would certainly be at a disadvantage when it comes to product liability,” Peot said.

Earlier in the article it says 67,000 annual blade contacts. 67,000 x $1,000-$1.5 million(damages per) = a liability of around $75 million to $100 billion annually. *for a rough idea

So they conspired to boycott a technology that could put them out of business.

It says later in the article,

In response to SawStop, five of the larger companies—including Black & Decker, Bosch and Ryobi—formed a joint venture to develop their own injury reduction system. The joint venture ended in 2009, when members said they had developed a safety system superior to SawStop’s, though they have yet to include it in a single saw.

hmm…

Anyways interesting stuff. Another interesting point was that the people at sawstop tried to license the tech but none of the companies wanted it. That s what lead them to start manufacturing on their own.

Google “disruptive innovation” for more info.

- InstantSiv

View bobro's profile

bobro

308 posts in 776 days


#13 posted 11-14-2014 04:05 PM

“Nanny State” is too kind of a moniker for what’s going on. A more accurate term would be “protection racket”, for behold what it’s all leading to: everyone will be required to have insurance for everything, but anything anyone does will be so regulated and legally restricted that insurance companies will have a million and one escape clauses and excuses not to pay up when someone does get injured or sick.

Even kitchen knives can be integrated into the scam. Simply mandate safety courses, in schools for example, and periodic renewals, like a driver’s license. If you don’t have the valid certificate insurance companies won’t have to pay when you cut yourself.

-- Lao Ma: You are so full of anger and hatred. Xena: Everybody's gotta be full of something.

View Rob's profile

Rob

704 posts in 2536 days


#14 posted 11-14-2014 04:08 PM

Rich, we’re in luck! Listen to the latest episode of Fine Woodworking’s Shop Talk Live podcast.
http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/115195/stl-72-another-tablesaw-lawsuit

it appears that SawStop is suing the industry (2014).

- altendky

The suit against the industry was thrown out several months ago. Coincidentally, SawStop is finally bringing a jobsite saw to market, but it will be almost as expensive as their contractor saw.

-- Ask an expert or be the expert - http://woodworking.stackexchange.com

View rantingrich's profile

rantingrich

372 posts in 811 days


#15 posted 11-14-2014 04:16 PM

Yes and this will PIZZZZZ you off speaking of the Nanny state….

If I was driving around with my kids in the car, and did NOT have them strapped into their seat belt/car seat, I would be prosecuted to the full extent of the law for my wanton and reckless behavior(s) AND endangering the live of myself and others… NO EXCUSES! NO EXCUSES! NO EXCUSES!

BUT one can not find “ONE” Seat BELT on any school bus in Illinois!

REALLY? REEEAALLLYY!

-- Rich

showing 1 through 15 of 54 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com