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Shaper tenoning jig

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Forum topic by unbob posted 11-13-2014 02:38 PM 2826 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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unbob

718 posts in 1367 days


11-13-2014 02:38 PM

http://www.scosarg.com/aigner-contermax-tenoning-clamp.html

I came across photos of this, then made a plywood mock up. I found this can work really well. It appears this tool is not available in the USA. I later built one similar but larger 15” capacity also using aluminum.
This tool has to be used with care, even though hands are protected, there is the possibility of the wood catching and kick back.
In use, the tool fully supports the wood on all sides and at the same time holding the wood flat-using front and rear backing wood on the locking face-along with a zero clearance insert on the fence. Works in the vertical position such as for the lock miter joint.
Anyone using these out there?


12 replies so far

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TheDane

4997 posts in 3127 days


#1 posted 11-13-2014 02:42 PM

Never seen this tool before … looks like a coping sled on steroids!

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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unbob

718 posts in 1367 days


#2 posted 11-13-2014 02:51 PM

The locking face of the jig.

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unbob

718 posts in 1367 days


#3 posted 11-13-2014 05:57 PM

Here is another Aigner jig for longer pieces.

http://www.vemashop.com/Spannlade

Apparently Aigner has a considerable line of tools for hand feeding work using the Aigner fence. But, not much info. To find some of these tools, have to know the name like “Spannlade”

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SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3049 days


#4 posted 11-13-2014 06:41 PM

I cannot see what this does exactly.What is the cam holder for.I see it is well made but the benefits I am missing something.??? please explain to the sub neanderthal woodworker LOL

OK I looked at it again it looks like a well made wood sled am I correct ?

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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unbob

718 posts in 1367 days


#5 posted 11-13-2014 08:03 PM

Normal horizontal use

Yes, it is simply a wood sled, except for it rides on top of the wood-uses the fence for guiding.
This gizmo, works quite well on the router table, though the one I constructed is a little on the large side.

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runswithscissors

2189 posts in 1489 days


#6 posted 11-14-2014 01:50 AM

I did some modifications to a tenoning jig that lets me make tenons on the shaper (originally used it on a router table). Completely different design from that, however. I can make all four sides of a tenon in under a minute, and it makes perfect tenons that require no touch up. The tenons can be as long as the straight bit you’re using. (I use router bits, not shaper cutters).

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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unbob

718 posts in 1367 days


#7 posted 11-14-2014 04:26 AM

Thanks for the response. Do you have a photo of that tenoning jig? I am looking for the easiest and best ways to do things. I also have a heavy sled unit that rides on top of the table, but, it is time consuming to set up and remove…. need another shaper.

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runswithscissors

2189 posts in 1489 days


#8 posted 11-16-2014 01:59 AM

Sorry for the delay. The shaper had been doing a different job, and I set it up with the tenoning jig rather hastily. Didn’t bother to hook up the DC (mistake). I found that feeding the stock in the normal fashion (against the rotation), it tends to tear out. Feeding the wrong way (with the rotation) gives a crisper cut, but is a little challenging because the bit wants to grab the work. When I was doing many tenons (something like 18 stiles X 2 ends= 36 tenons for 6 closet doors), I rigged up a weight and pulley to help control this tendency.

The bit shown is a 1” X 2”. It must be very sharp to get a clean cut. The cuts on the edges are done with the aluminum clamping device facing the camera. The vertical “fence” is adjustable. The stock clamp is made from cannibalized parts from an old C clamp (as I remember). The clamp for doing the faces is a toggle that replaced the standard screw clamp, simply because it is much quicker, The screw clamp required 2 hands to operate. I also faced the vertical part with self stick sandpaper (stuff intended for non-skid applications).

When feeding material against the rotation, the dust is of course shot at 90 deg. to be picked up by the DC. When feeding the “wrong way,” the dust is shot at 180 deg. I had to cobble together a pickup for this. That DC port follows along with the tenoning jig as it moves, going and coming.

By the way, I found that I had more control when I stood at the wrong end of the shaper, which is why I took the photos from that perspective.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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unbob

718 posts in 1367 days


#9 posted 11-16-2014 05:40 AM

Wow! That is a slick set up!
Thanks for taking the time to show that. I think I can adapt that to the shaper I have.

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1773 days


#10 posted 11-16-2014 09:02 AM

iiii

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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runswithscissors

2189 posts in 1489 days


#11 posted 11-16-2014 08:17 PM

????

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3049 days


#12 posted 11-16-2014 08:59 PM

Really nice work BoB .Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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