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Wood turning end grain vase

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Forum topic by Ash96 posted 11-12-2014 03:03 PM 1397 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ash96

3 posts in 757 days


11-12-2014 03:03 PM

Hello,

I am fairly new to woodturning. I just got my first lathe and have been doing a lot of practice. The outside part of the vase turning seems pretty straight forward to me. It is when I need to hollow the vase, that it becomes a major problem. I have watched several videos on youtube about this subject. I know I need more practice, but I could use some woodturning advise. Please give me some pointers as I would like to do some hollowing.

Thanks,

Ash96


9 replies so far

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1195 days


#1 posted 11-12-2014 04:09 PM

Ash, without knowing what kind of problems you’re having, I wouldn’t know where to start. When you state your problems, then you should more information than you can process. ............ Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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Ash96

3 posts in 757 days


#2 posted 11-12-2014 04:22 PM

Sorry, here is more info. I first tried hollowing end grain on a small box I was trying to make for my daughter. I tried to hollow with a spindle gouge, as soon as I started. I got the center little knob. I now know to drill out the center to keep this from happening. Let’s just say I was getting a lot of chatter on this box as I moved from center to outside with the gouge. So much so that the box went flying :( Ok so round two I drilled the center of another small box, but seemed to have the same type of chattering. This box went out of round fast, so it became uncontrollable. I think my biggest problem is the chatter, for some reason I can’t seem to stop it as I approach the outside of the box.

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Wildwood

1886 posts in 1600 days


#3 posted 11-12-2014 05:39 PM

Do you have a drill chuck you can mount in the tailstock?

Do you have a set of forstner bits or bit the appropriate size?

Once drilled can clean up bottom with round/square scraper.

I prefer to use a spindle gouge and it takes a little practice. If getting vibration or chatter you are rushing the cut. Slow down!

-- Bill

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LeeMills

271 posts in 766 days


#4 posted 11-12-2014 06:46 PM

It sounds like you are working correctly from the center to the outside.
As others said, sharp tools and take your time.
What type chuck/jaws are you using? You want a fairly long tenon to help stop the action of trying to pull it out of the chuck. Even with short items, such as 2-3” deep boxes I use my spigot jaws and a tenon about an inch long.
This may not be pragmatic if you are using nice store bought wood rather than fog wood. It sounds like your are wedging the item out of the jaws quite a bit.
The bottom I clean up with a scraper and cuts should be very light given the small working area and the length of the tool over the rest.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View Ash96's profile

Ash96

3 posts in 757 days


#5 posted 11-12-2014 07:11 PM

I am using a Nova G3 chuck. I don’t currently have the option of a drill chuck. This may be part of my issue, as I tried to free hand drill the center, but it was only with a small bit. I will certainly have to get me a good forester bit for the center hole. I keep reading that carbide is the way to go on these, so I will pick one up soon. I also hope to have a better lathe setup soon, that will allow me to have a drill chuck.

I am really into turning, I just wish I would have picked this up when I was younger. :)

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LeeMills

271 posts in 766 days


#6 posted 11-12-2014 08:24 PM

These other guys are a lot better than I am but I don’t drill either. Except for some roughing out I also don’t use the carbide tools.
I can’t explain it in detail but here is one example of using your spindle gouge. Most of the time I just push straight in to the about one inch and then move back out and start to hollow. Then push straight in again to add more depth.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hcQohOZDb7c
If you do a youtube search for woodturning boxes there are a lot of videos that may help you. Of the first half dozen plus listings I recognized most of the names. Watching three of four I think you may find a visual answer to some of your problems.

With your G3 and the standard 2” jaws I would go with a tenon about 1/2” long and you will still not bottom out in the chuck. I assume you know that with the 2” Nova jaws you do not cut a dovetail; just cut a straight tenon as they instruct and let the interior lip bite into the wood. If you cut a dovetail it will actually make it easier to wedge the piece free.

Sorry I just noticed the topic was vases… then I caught boxes. Boxes are typically no more than 2-3 inches deep.
For vases that may be 6” deep minimum I do think you will need to drill first. For me 6” is the absolute max depth of any overhang and then it is iffy.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View lew's profile

lew

11340 posts in 3220 days


#7 posted 11-12-2014 09:44 PM

Ditch the spindle gouge and get bowl gouges instead.

Don’t overlook the bowl scraper, either. It isn’t as aggressive as the gouge and makes a smooth cut.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1886 posts in 1600 days


#8 posted 11-12-2014 10:22 PM

Whether turning boxes or vases all about depth after complete turning the outside. How deep do you want box or vase to be? With spindle, bowl gouges, and scrapers take practice as you extend tool over the rest. Eventually will reach a limit where cannot control a tool any longer.

A forstner bit with an extension might help if not going too fast. Those hex bolts that come with extensions not very big and can only be tighten so much before they strip and bit is turning.

http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=packard&Product_Code=150115&Category_Code=drilling-bits-forstner

If really want to go deeper need hollowing tools. Hollowing tool can be hand held, capture or articulating system. Also better to use wet wood or wet dry wood to avoid cracking.

The pencil box 3 ¾” high and 2 ¾” deep and turned with a spindle gouge & round nose scraper.
The vase is 6 ½” tall and 6” deep. I used my captured hollowing system to reach that depth.

-- Bill

View Troy Cleckler 's profile

Troy Cleckler

384 posts in 836 days


#9 posted 11-12-2014 10:34 PM

+1 on the bowl gouge and close it to use it as a shear scraper. This might help some with the chatter but any tool that overhangs the rest by more that a couple of inches is hard to control and keep on centerline will cause chatter. i wnated to do deeper vases and hollow forms so with the help from here and other sights, I built an articulated arm system and it works great.

-- Troy. - Measure twice, cut once and fill the gaps....

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