LumberJocks

First piece of furniture - help on finishing choices

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by Mark2457 posted 11-10-2014 09:16 PM 686 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Mark2457's profile

Mark2457

49 posts in 1045 days


11-10-2014 09:16 PM

Topic tags/keywords: liming wax finishing

Hi Guys

I just made my first piece of furniture (see attached). It’s made from red oak, but is a very light (very nice) color. I would very much like to retain the color. The LAST thing i want it to become is that honeyed oak color. It’s going to be on a screened in porch (that has storm windows in winter).

I was thinking of liming it, but not sure what i would put on top of that to protect it.

What are my choices (with or without liming) that would keep the lightness intact?

Thanks

Mark


6 replies so far

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6565 posts in 1611 days


#1 posted 11-10-2014 10:31 PM

I think a Lacquer or a water based Poly will keep it the clearest. Keep in mind that it will darken though with any finish on it. Someone else may be able to offer more help than I can, however.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2410 posts in 1975 days


#2 posted 11-10-2014 10:37 PM

+1 on the clear lacquer.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13448 posts in 1317 days


#3 posted 11-10-2014 10:37 PM

If you want to keep the light color, I second the water based poly.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View Mark2457's profile

Mark2457

49 posts in 1045 days


#4 posted 11-11-2014 02:50 AM

Thanks guys

View Flipper01's profile

Flipper01

39 posts in 764 days


#5 posted 11-11-2014 02:56 AM

I changed our entire 1999, honey oak colored kitchen out to new oak cabinetry retaining the framing. We wanted the same, natural look you’re going for so I thinned out water-based whitewash and hand rubbed it in. That acted as a sealer and I clear-coated 6x after that. They came out perfect; not the whitewash look but the same light oak we were looking for. I’m certainly not a professional by any stretch but it worked for me.

View Mark2457's profile

Mark2457

49 posts in 1045 days


#6 posted 11-11-2014 01:49 PM



I changed our entire 1999, honey oak colored kitchen out to new oak cabinetry retaining the framing. We wanted the same, natural look you re going for so I thinned out water-based whitewash and hand rubbed it in. That acted as a sealer and I clear-coated 6x after that. They came out perfect; not the whitewash look but the same light oak we were looking for. I m certainly not a professional by any stretch but it worked for me.

- Flipper01

Hey Flipper01

Sounds exactly what I’m looking for. never used whitewash or clear coat. Any brands you recommend? Is there a wipe on clear coat available? I don’t have a sprayer (and more more importantly the skills to use it)

Regards

Mark

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com