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Plane making "twisted" edges.

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Forum topic by giser3546 posted 11-10-2014 06:45 PM 1064 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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giser3546

179 posts in 933 days


11-10-2014 06:45 PM

I have no jointer so my 1940’s Stanley #7 is used very regularly, which has been the case since I’ve gotten the thing a year or two ago. Not sure if something has happened to my plane or if I’ve just been paying closer attention to the squareness of the edges but recently it hasn’t been working and I can’t figure out why. After using the plane the edge seem to have a twist to them. If I check one end for squareness to the face it will be out of square in one direction, and the opposite end will be out of square in the other direction. My mother has a Jet Sliding table cabinet saw with a large metal table so I used that and some sand paper to flatten the sole but that seems to have made no difference. What else could be causing this issue?

-- "If you wait for it to rain, It will"


15 replies so far

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Loren

8295 posts in 3109 days


#1 posted 11-10-2014 06:50 PM

heh. Yeah. This stuff can be tricky.

http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/4058

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

8074 posts in 1753 days


#2 posted 11-10-2014 06:59 PM

I mean this in no offensive way, so if it comes across that way it’s not how I mean it. It’s probably a technique issue if you’ve flattened the sole and the iron is square. Realistically even if the iron wasn’t square, it should have the same out of square on both ends.

What size of board are we talking? Maybe where you start the plane causes you to put more pressure on one side, and then how you end on the other end of the board causes you to put pressure on the other?

Other thing is, you’re sure the board itself doesn’t have any twist in the face side? Maybe you’re jointing it straight, but the board itself is twisted…

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

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JayT

4772 posts in 1672 days


#3 posted 11-10-2014 07:01 PM

Technique. That issue is common if not paying attention to proper jointing technique and staying in practice. A couple of things that can help.

  • If planing an edge to get a glue joint, plane both pieces at the same time. Lay the two boards out as you want to to glue them up, then “fold” them together so that the faces that will be the same surface are touching. Then plane the edges. Any twist or other slight imperfection will be cancelled out by the opposite edge having a an inverse profile.
  • Clamp another sacrificial board alongside to help support the plane as you edge joint.
  • Consider adding/making a jointer fence. These can be made out of scrap wood and some magnets and are helpful for keeping the plane square.

I use the edge match planing anytime I am doing glue ups. If doing a single board, I have to check frequently that everything is staying square or can end up with the same issues you are describing.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

1189 posts in 1355 days


#4 posted 11-10-2014 08:50 PM

Agree with everyone above. As you go, check, re-check and re-double-triple-quadruple-check anything you’re planing by hand. I use a machinist square or combo square, put it at various spots on the board to make sure everything’s 90.

Also, don’t scrape like a madman. Not saying you’re doing that but if you don’t rush and take your time and fully concentrate on the areas that need to go down, it will be to your benefit.

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bandit571

14547 posts in 2144 days


#5 posted 11-10-2014 09:14 PM

How long a board is being jointed? Long enough that you have to move a bit, or change a grip?

Sometimes doing too long a stretch of an edge will change the way a plane sits on the edge. Plane as far as you can without having to stretch, stop, move your body forward without moving the plane, and start pushing the plane again.

IF you are standing in the middle doing a long edge, there will be a twist made. Just the way your grip changes as you go along. Stand at the one end, push as far as comfortable, stop, you move forward without moving the plane, and go again. Repeat until the other end is reached. Check with a square.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1056 posts in 1450 days


#6 posted 11-10-2014 09:22 PM

I suspect technique. The pointer on jointing both edge at the same time for a glue up – always if possible. I can’t joint edges very well w/o a fence. The fence isn’t perfect, it takes a little practice, but it helps a lot.

I use this jointer fence. It works with any Stanley style bench plane. ~$45

View LeTurbo's profile

LeTurbo

217 posts in 1046 days


#7 posted 11-10-2014 09:30 PM

I know I have a bias to plane more deeply on the right, so that causes problems if I swop a board end-over-end. But I’m aware of it now, and use my square to check where I’m going. It may just be, as you say, that you’re now paying closer attention. Of course, once you can see what you’re doing, you can use it to great advantage. It influences the way I stand, and the direction I mount stuff in the vice – but also means I can now plane a perfect bevel right down the edge.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

14547 posts in 2144 days


#8 posted 11-10-2014 09:31 PM

On this plane I use as a Jointer

I do not use the front knob. I place the thumb of my left hand on top of the body, and the knuckle of my index finger against the wood. Instant fence. It will also tell me IF the plane is tipping one way or the other.

With the iron bodied DE6c, same front grip, as well. I do use the front knobs on face planning. But, not on an edge.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Don W's profile

Don W

17959 posts in 2028 days


#9 posted 11-10-2014 09:55 PM

I do the same as Bandit. I hold my fingers under the plane. It the only reason I’d rather have a smooth bottom jointer. The corrugations tend to pinch my fingers a little. It doesn’t hurt, its just annoying.

It both helps control the plane and hold it square.

I also like my plane and work piece to be higher, so the grip on the tote is different as well. Its more of a straight behind push then a downward force you use when smoothing.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View giser3546's profile

giser3546

179 posts in 933 days


#10 posted 11-11-2014 07:44 PM

I appreciate it guys. The stock I’m squaring is about 30” long so nothing too crazy. I first notticed this issue when I was trying to make a butcher block out of some figured black walnut and became more annoyed when the same thing happened with straight grain pine. I do like the idea of the fence but would rather not have to buy one. For now I will try to pay extra attention to my technique and will probably try to pane both of the jointing faces at once.

-- "If you wait for it to rain, It will"

View Don W's profile

Don W

17959 posts in 2028 days


#11 posted 11-11-2014 07:56 PM

There are several diy fences here on lj’s if you want to make one.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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giser3546

179 posts in 933 days


#12 posted 11-11-2014 08:31 PM

Has anyone ever had any luck with the the Lie Nielsen edge plane?

-- "If you wait for it to rain, It will"

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

1189 posts in 1355 days


#13 posted 11-12-2014 01:17 AM

I’ve used that L-N plane briefly, to me it seems like too much of a luxury because I’m able to straighten an edge with any and all the planes in my inventory. Plus it’s not very big, so it can’t knock down highs like longer bench planes or a jointer. Yeah, it works for what it does but it’s so specialized and I can already do what it does without it, I figure why bother?

View gargey's profile

gargey

457 posts in 236 days


#14 posted 10-11-2016 02:41 PM


Has anyone ever had any luck with the the Lie Nielsen edge plane?

- giser3546

Yes. I used it, went for a while going without it, and came back to using it. I found that it can speed things up a bunch.

Use it to get the edge square first, then plane a hollow, then joint, and then take one pass with it again to ensure the edge is still perfectly square.

Makes things fast, easy and reliable compared to dealing with a fence.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2190 posts in 942 days


#15 posted 10-11-2016 02:53 PM

No need for fence or such.

You can shoot the edges. Just a spacer and a stop block.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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