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Forum topic by dozer57 posted 11-10-2014 04:04 PM 929 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dozer57

92 posts in 967 days


11-10-2014 04:04 PM

Going to have stroke if I ruin another leg. Here is my problem, glue up 3×3 cherry stock and when I am turning the legs I have tear outs and poor finish cuts. I made a test leg from maple and it came out perfect. Is there a trick to cherry that i am missing or something. I have noticed hard and soft spots giving poor cuts and causing catches. Any help. My tools are sharp and have tried different speeds , high speed works better but catches are worse.


10 replies so far

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1887 posts in 1602 days


#1 posted 11-10-2014 08:05 PM

I have never had any trouble turning any species of solid Cherry wood with one exception. Cherry that was a darker brown verus red crumbled while trying to turn. Not sure if called black or brown rot but it renders wood useless for anything.

So what are you doing wrong?

Could orientation of wood grain before glued up be better?

Wish I had an answer for you.

-- Bill

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7934 posts in 1847 days


#2 posted 11-11-2014 04:58 AM


Could orientation of wood grain before glued up be better?
- Wildwood

That was my first thought. The grain is probably going all different directions so you are cutting with and against the grain at the same time. I’m not sure what the solution is if the blank is already glued. I would say try cutting from each direction then stop the lathe and check for tearout.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1837 days


#3 posted 11-11-2014 12:19 PM



The grain is probably going all different directions so you are cutting with and against the grain at the same time. – Rick M.

+1. I haven’t turned cherry, but I have a stack of cherry I’ve been working through. It has beautiful grain patterns, but if not planed carefully and from different directions based on the grain, it tears out like nobody’s business.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View hairy's profile

hairy

2384 posts in 2999 days


#4 posted 11-11-2014 03:31 PM

Cutting uphill against the grain will cause tearout. Is the grain direction the same on your glued pieces?

As the diameter decreases you need to lower the toolrest to keep the same angle.

Re sharpen just before the final cut.

Maybe that piece is haunted? I had 1 of those once. Just my 2 cents…

-- stay thirsty my friends...

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

3187 posts in 2244 days


#5 posted 11-11-2014 03:43 PM

Cherry can be funny stuff. Is the cherry kiln dried and if so, to what temp? Kiln dried wood, especially cherry, can get very brittle. I try to stay with air dried cherry, oak, walnut, maple, etc…

-- David in Damascus, MD

View dozer57's profile

dozer57

92 posts in 967 days


#6 posted 11-11-2014 04:33 PM



Cutting uphill against the grain will cause tearout. Is the grain direction the same on your glued pieces?

- hairy
I am using 6/4 rough cut cherry 60 in. long, I have jointed one side and one edge then cut to 3 in wide. no tear out here at this stage. Glued up to make 2 3/4 in stock,( Tighbond 2) Grain direction is the same on all pieces, maybe some flipped end for end. Re jointed one edge with no tear outs. the I ran through planer with a small amount of tear out, blades may be dulling a bit. Crap happens at the next stage—-at the lathe—-sharpen my tools and set tool rest to center——lathe on slow speed——5/8 spindle gauge in hand and start to rough down, all good here.
Problems start now. I like the cut of a sheer gouge on spindles, not much sanding to do. This cherry stock with sheer cut looks like I am trying to make spiral designs, I get high spots and this is what I am getting catches and tear outs. I tried different gouges to cut design but no better. Am I turning to slow or wrong angles. I am new to the lathe and every thing is trial and error. Maple test legs turned out great. I am stumped :(( can’t afford to ruin more of my cherry stock. PS : making legs for a 3 in on crib for my first great grand child due in May of 2015. ( no I am not that old.)
THANKS

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

3187 posts in 2244 days


#7 posted 11-11-2014 05:25 PM

The places that you are turning, make sure you ease the corners with a chisel or spoke shave so the material is not square.

-- David in Damascus, MD

View hairy's profile

hairy

2384 posts in 2999 days


#8 posted 11-11-2014 06:10 PM

Try raising the toolrest. You want to start out slightly above center and go down as the diameter decreases.

Spiral chatter is from flexing. Don’t push too hard, is your tailstock too tight? Maybe a spindle steady rest?

If you don’t have a lot of detail you can do a lot with a spindle roughing gouge, and get good clean cuts.

You’ll figure it out.

-- stay thirsty my friends...

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7934 posts in 1847 days


#9 posted 11-11-2014 06:18 PM

Low speed? I would be up around 1200 rpm minimum, probably above 1500.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View dozer57's profile

dozer57

92 posts in 967 days


#10 posted 11-11-2014 06:52 PM

Ok just went and tried it again. roughing gauge till I got the rough shape the then a shear to final shape at higher speed. minor tears that all sanded out with ROS on lathe at slow speed. Now to duplicate it 3 more times. :( A little more sanding and I will be happy man. simple form but don’t want it to complex and screw it up.

THANKS

THANKS AGAIN

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