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How cold do you keep your shop?

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Forum topic by becikeja posted 11-09-2014 12:44 PM 1352 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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becikeja

648 posts in 2281 days


11-09-2014 12:44 PM

My shop is separate from the house, and I only get to use it on the weekends. During the winter I do have a heater, and will typically warm it up to about 65 degrees when I am out there. But during the week I obviously don’t want to pay for the heat, so I let it cool off and set the heater at about 40 degrees. I try to keep it above freezing at all times as I do keep the glue, stains etc…. out there.

-- Don't outsmart your common sense


24 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3950 posts in 1961 days


#1 posted 11-09-2014 12:54 PM

My shop has a gas furnace and the thermostat only goes down to 50º, so that’s the low temp. If it went down to 40º I’d let it go there, like you said you only need to keep stuff from freezing. To be honest, I doubt it would freeze even if I turned the heat off….except on the very coldest/windiest of days. This is a detached building, and is fairly well insulated. But I know my attached/unheated garage never gets below freezing, though at times it’s close. I suspect if I was in colder climes that may not be the case, but my part of west central Ohio really isn’t that brutal normally.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View muleskinner's profile

muleskinner

881 posts in 1904 days


#2 posted 11-09-2014 02:43 PM

I don’t have any installed heating in my shop. In freezing temperatures I put a 60 watt incandescent in the cabinet that I keep finish and glue in.

-- Visualize whirled peas

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Bob Kassmeyer

184 posts in 2393 days


#3 posted 11-09-2014 02:44 PM

I keep mine at about 50 degrees when I’m not in it, but I try to go out every morning before work. I would like to go out in the evening but am usually to fatigued and don’t feel it is safe. The instructions with the heater say not to go below 45 as it causes condensation with the temperature swings. I don’t think our gas bill went up more than $5.00 with keeping it at 50 when I’m not there.

-- Bob Kassmeyer, Nebraska

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Fred Hargis

3950 posts in 1961 days


#4 posted 11-09-2014 02:54 PM

The instructions with the heater say not to go below 45 as it causes condensation with the temperature swings. I don t think our gas bill went up more than $5.00 with keeping it at 50 when I m not there.

- Bob Kassmeyer

Good point, my heater is LP and I have a meter on the shop. Last year was the coldest winter we had here and I burned 100 gallons of LP ($200 for the winter). A lot higher than nat gas, but still fairly cheap….and that’s with being heated to 65 during all the days (I’m retired).

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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lateralus819

2236 posts in 1357 days


#5 posted 11-09-2014 03:13 PM

I use a wood stove. Sucks in the winter as it takes forever to get heated up (about 24×40).

It is mildly insulated, so it does stay warm once the stove is going.

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oltexasboy1

240 posts in 1172 days


#6 posted 11-09-2014 04:20 PM

I have what is left over from the washer and dryer in our 1 car garage in a old Korean war house. No heat no A/C.
I worked out in the weather for so many years that just having a roof is an improvement .

-- "The pursuit of perfection often yields excellence"

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3950 posts in 1961 days


#7 posted 11-09-2014 04:20 PM

Correction to what I said above about using 100 gallons of LP last year. Looked at my records, it was actually 150 gallons for the shop, so it was about $300. Sorry ‘bout that.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2150 posts in 1640 days


#8 posted 11-09-2014 05:09 PM

I have a separate shop. Heat it with wood pellets. I’ll go out in morning and start stove and with in a couple hours it is in the 60’s I generally try to keep it 65 to 68. When I leave at night i shut the heat off even on below zero night it had never got below about 38. I insulated it well when I built it and put an extra inch of rigid on the garage door after it was installed.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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firefighterontheside

13524 posts in 1324 days


#9 posted 11-09-2014 05:56 PM

I’m working on that right now. I left my space heater set to the lowest setting when I left it yesterday. Went in there this morning and it was cool but not cold. My intention is to buy a plug in thermostat that my heater plugs into. It will let me set the temp to 45 deg. Then I can heat it up from there. I’ve frozen too much glue and paint in the past. I intend to get a lot of stuff made in there this winter.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1777 days


#10 posted 11-09-2014 06:11 PM

50-70

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Chris's profile

Chris

191 posts in 775 days


#11 posted 11-09-2014 10:37 PM

My shop is a detached, an uninsulated single vehicle garage. Although, none of our vehicles would fit. In the summer, it’s great. The trees above keep it cool and comfortable. But as we approach Thanksgiving, things change…fast. I do have a floor propane heater. I leave the tank outside and run the gas hose under the bay door. Once the shop heats up, I can turn the flame down to low and I’m fine for working. Although, last winter, New England had a cold snap that went on for weeks. The heater couldn’t keep things warm enough to be comfy. it got so bad that beer cans in the fridge exploded!

Also, during the winter, I move my glues and finish products into the basement.

-- Liberalism... Ideas so good, they have to be mandatory.

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firefighterontheside

13524 posts in 1324 days


#12 posted 11-09-2014 10:53 PM

Interesting that you mention the fridge, Chris. I have a fridge in the shop this year and I want to keep things from freezing, which is one reason to keep it around 45 in there.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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Woodmaster1

738 posts in 2054 days


#13 posted 11-09-2014 11:00 PM

I keep mine at 55 and 65-68 when working. This is my first year for heat so I will see how much it affects the gas bill. I am on a budget so I figure if it goes up 15 to 20 dollars a month it will be worth it.

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changeoffocus

457 posts in 1085 days


#14 posted 11-09-2014 11:39 PM

I heat my shop to 50F unoccupied and 65F occupied, once the lights are all on it overheats fast.
I only have one long outside wall and it’s stone and brick 24” thick, the spaces on other sides and above are conditioned 24/7 by others so my cost to heat is minimal.

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ElChe

630 posts in 804 days


#15 posted 11-10-2014 01:11 AM

When my shop was in my garage I didn’t heat it unless I was in it working. I live in cold dry weather but my garage has good insulation. My soda cans would got cold but didn’t freeze. Now that I have a shop with ridiculously high insulation (e.g. ceiling has close to R50) I leave it toasty in the low 70s all winter long. Even the cat likes to hang out in the shop. I figure anything above freezing works provided moisture is controlled?

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

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