LumberJocks

Too Much Dust Collection

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by bbeardb posted 11-09-2014 03:05 AM 2001 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View bbeardb's profile

bbeardb

11 posts in 771 days


11-09-2014 03:05 AM

First of all, sorry if I’m posting in the wrong place. Still trying to figure this forum out. I’ve loved lurking here for years.

Today I scored two, 3HP, 220V, single phase, old school dust collectors. They draw 22amps. No idea their CFM, but likely more than I’ll need using one tool at a time in my garage. The guy refused to sell only one, but I got them both for $200 so I’m not complaining.

I was planning on using the blower and motor, mount it up in the rafters, hook it up to a Thien or cyclone and vent the rest out the roof. I’m thinking that a Thien might not have enough air volume to separate as much dust considering the volume I expect this to be pulling and the one whole tool at a time it’ll be hooked up to. I’ll have one drop in middle of the garage with a flex hose I’ll move from tool to tool. The worst tool I’ll have will be the drum sander (for the fines), followed by the planer (for shear volume).

If I do a cyclone it’ll probably be this guys as they are affordable and seem to have quite a bit of volume: http://www.ebay.com/usr/eastcaroga

Has anyone tried a Thien for a large dust collector?

Is there any issue with having a say 6 foot drop form the cyclone to the can, or from the blower to the Thien?

Just an interesting note, it appears the motor can be wired for 110, but would draw 44 amps! See photos. The little red HF is what I have been using.

-- Beard


21 replies so far

View bbeardb's profile

bbeardb

11 posts in 771 days


#1 posted 11-09-2014 03:06 AM

Just realized maybe I could do a Thien in each of the rings as they are fairly large, and somehow funnel them down into one collector.

-- Beard

View Bill7255's profile

Bill7255

354 posts in 1751 days


#2 posted 11-09-2014 12:23 PM

I would definitely go 220V. That is a lot of amps at 110v. Not sure what wire size would be needed. I have ran my Jet 1100 with a Thien. With the drum sander it is only about 60% efficient. That would mean you would be blowing a lot of dust on the roof. If you do decide to go outside it would be better if you could go out the side of the building and then into a drum outside. And when I run my planer I have overfilled it a couple of times meaning all the chips go to the collector. I also have a Jet 1900 that I am setting up. I couldn’t afford the popular cyclones and bought the ebay one. I am just now setting this system up and don’t have any experience yet. Regardless if they work you got one heck of a deal on a 3hp D system. IMO you could easily sell the one you don’t need for your investment and then some.

-- Bill R

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3947 posts in 1959 days


#3 posted 11-09-2014 01:01 PM

You didn’t say what size ductwork you plan on using. If it’s 4”, the DC isn’t going to pull all that much air (maybe 400CFM, +/-) so a normal size Thein would be perfect. (that much air probably isn’t going to capture all the DS fines, either). If you run 6”, build your Thein to accomodate it. The height won’t have enough of an impact to worry about, and you wouldn’t need to build a Thein for each ring, one should be enough if it’s sized correctly. With your plan, I think I would scrap the carriage of the DC, use the blower as you want, and buiold a Thein on a 55 gallon drum (again, with 6” ducts. All the way to the tools.)

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View bbeardb's profile

bbeardb

11 posts in 771 days


#4 posted 11-09-2014 02:19 PM



I have ran my Jet 1100 with a Thien. With the drum sander it is only about 60% efficient… And when I run my planer I have overfilled it a couple of times meaning all the chips go to the collector.

- Bill7255

That’s what I needed to hear. Not what I was hoping for, but nonetheless, good to know. If you could let me know how the ebay cyclone works out for you when you get it set up I’d appreciate it.

I do plan on doing 6” to everything I can. Perhaps I’ll build a Thien and bag it until I make or buy a more efficient cyclone. I’ll have to see if I can find 6” plans somewhere.

-- Beard

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3947 posts in 1959 days


#5 posted 11-09-2014 02:57 PM

I built the Wood mag cyclone quite some years ago, and modified it to a 6” inlet/outlet to match my DC. With a neutral vane it actually works fairly well and is an easy build.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Bill7255's profile

Bill7255

354 posts in 1751 days


#6 posted 11-10-2014 11:35 AM


I have ran my Jet 1100 with a Thien. With the drum sander it is only about 60% efficient… And when I run my planer I have overfilled it a couple of times meaning all the chips go to the collector.

- Bill7255

That s what I needed to hear. Not what I was hoping for, but nonetheless, good to know. If you could let me know how the ebay cyclone works out for you when you get it set up I d appreciate it.

I do plan on doing 6” to everything I can. Perhaps I ll build a Thien and bag it until I make or buy a more efficient cyclone. I ll have to see if I can find 6” plans somewhere.

- bbeardb

I will let you know how the cyclone works. The Thien works very well with most tools like the planer with much better efficiency than the drum sander. Just keep an eye on it so you don’t overfill. The ebay has a 7” outlet to the DC and a 6” inlet. I will run 6” to the tools and run 7” to the DC. I am still 3 weeks away from getting everything set up to test.

-- Bill R

View CincyRW's profile

CincyRW

156 posts in 1116 days


#7 posted 11-10-2014 02:08 PM

Not sure where you’re using it (looks like your garage) – realize that if you vent it to the outside, you’re creating negative pressure in your workshop. Not a problem unless you have a furnace, HW heater or another combustion source as it could suck the flue gasses back down into your work shop.

View bbeardb's profile

bbeardb

11 posts in 771 days


#8 posted 11-11-2014 03:39 AM

I fired them up for the first time tonight. They may truly be too much dust collection. Well, maybe not too much, but I was honestly concerned for the safety of my appendages.

I’m not sure how to proceed at the moment. I think maybe I’ll fix up one and use it as a chip collector and not worry about dust. Then contemplate whether to use a Thien, cyclone, vent outside, filter inside, etc. Even the though of trying to retrofit all my tools with 6” ports started to confuse me today, so I have a feeling I’ll be contemplating for a long time…

-- Beard

View bbeardb's profile

bbeardb

11 posts in 771 days


#9 posted 11-11-2014 03:41 AM

Oh, and I’m not worried about negative pressure, it’s an unfinished, non-climate controlled garage. It’s cold in the winter and hot in the summer, and venting outside would simply mean more of the same, but maybe some nice circulation.

-- Beard

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3947 posts in 1959 days


#10 posted 11-11-2014 12:24 PM

Beard, if you use those with the existing bags for your trial period be aware that 30 micron bags (I’m guessing that’s what they are) catch pretty much none of the finest dust, and make your DC little more than a dust pump. It will put it back into the air much more effectively than the tool that created it in the fist place.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View timbertailor's profile

timbertailor

1592 posts in 890 days


#11 posted 11-11-2014 04:36 PM

Maybe dedicate one for a sanding table (a decent sized table requires a LOT of HP).

I am very pleased with my Thien Cyclone performance. I do admit, I do not use a large drum sander.
I do not even have a collection bag any more. There just is very little getting past the separator.

If you can exhaust outside, you can save yourself a lot of money on filtration.


Beard, if you use those with the existing bags for your trial period be aware that 30 micron bags (I m guessing that s what they are) catch pretty much none of the finest dust, and make your DC little more than a dust pump. It will put it back into the air much more effectively than the tool that created it in the fist place.

- Fred Hargis

Totally agree. Worse than using a broom and dust pan.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

View buildingmonkey's profile

buildingmonkey

242 posts in 1013 days


#12 posted 11-11-2014 07:37 PM

Seems the easiest way to set up your system would be to use the ebay cyclone, and just use your blower to push through the cyclone. If the cyclone works right, you should be able to separate most of the sawdust from the air. Wish you lived near me, I am looking for a 3hp bag system to upgrade my cyclone. Most critical thing I found is to make sure you have no air leaks between the blower and the cyclone when you set it up. Makes the system separate the dust from the air, and any leak creates a lot of dust going past the cyclone.

-- Jim from Kansas

View jgt1942's profile

jgt1942

137 posts in 1354 days


#13 posted 11-12-2014 02:00 AM

I have a Thien on my highly modified Grizzly and HIGHLY recommend it.

I’m going to add a sensor to turn the unit off when the can is full. The only time I get something in the bags is when I over fill the can. When this happens I see the sawdust in the Thien unit. Another upgrade will be to run pipes in the shop. I originally thought that the portable unit would be OK but it is a pain when I start switching between different tools.

-- JohnT

View bbeardb's profile

bbeardb

11 posts in 771 days


#14 posted 11-12-2014 05:18 AM

Jim, any particular reason to push rather than pull through the cyclone? I never considered pushing.

John, any chance I could get some dimensions on your Thien? Basically, I’m wondering if you made the slot bigger than standard, or the unit taller. Since I have the rings and I don’t plan on using them (or at least one of them) I was considering using that as my separator since it already has an angled inlet and the cone on top which I assume would help.

-- Beard

View buildingmonkey's profile

buildingmonkey

242 posts in 1013 days


#15 posted 11-13-2014 01:52 AM

Your dust collector is built as a push through but uses bags, so it is stout enough to hit a few scraps, and it would be easy to set up that way. The dustcop cyclones are designed that way, and they are commercial units.

-- Jim from Kansas

showing 1 through 15 of 21 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com