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Interior Door Advise Needed.......

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Forum topic by Gshepherd posted 11-08-2014 02:39 AM 1591 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Gshepherd

1727 posts in 1666 days


11-08-2014 02:39 AM

Next month I will be doing roughly 13 Interior Doors, They will will be 1 3/4 Raised Panel Hard Maple with the arched top as well as the door jambs. I did some internet searchin and of course here first on some information and of course some good ole LJ advise.

Interior Door Software avail? Tells me sizing for the parts. The doors will vary from a 24 to 36 in wide.

Best equiipment option for doing the Hinges and door knob hole?

Arched Template kit for Interior Doors?

Best to go with 5/4 and laminate or just go for the 8/4 material? Double the panels.

Epoxy or Titebond II?

Anything else i’m missin here?

My frst thought is to laminate the rail and stiles just for stability from twist and warping vs 8/4. Laminate and S4S through the moulder/Run the Stile stock through the moulder. my tooling can go from moulder to shaper.

I have a 6 head moulder and a 7hp PM Shaper. I have a bunch of corrugated cope and stick cutters that came from a door company that went our of biz some years back. Trust me some of these have some long tenons. Even thought of getting the XL Domino.

I have done some interior doors in the past but they were for pocket doors. I used the Freud Interior door bits. Nothing against Freud bits but those do not give me a warm and fuzzy feeling on ths project. It’s been a long brutal day so I know I am forgetting something here.

Any advise would be greatly appreciated here guys.

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........


15 replies so far

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Gshepherd

1727 posts in 1666 days


#1 posted 11-08-2014 05:50 AM

107 views and no answers, Wow

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

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AnonymousRequest

861 posts in 1013 days


#2 posted 11-08-2014 01:06 PM

Go to owwm.org, post your question on Swarf. Their is probably a lot more experience there regarding your question.

View jap's profile

jap

1251 posts in 1518 days


#3 posted 11-08-2014 03:05 PM

Titebond is fine, no need for epoxy.
Using laminated stock for the rails and stiles will make it less likely to twist, and easier to get straight in the first place.

-- Joel

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cutmantom

389 posts in 2499 days


#4 posted 11-08-2014 03:18 PM

Look at some existing doors for the size ,Stiles 5-6”,bottom rail 8-10”, top and intermediate rails same as Stiles ,Bosch hinge jig I think is b,etter than porter cable, hole drilling can be done without a jig to save money but a layout template will increase accuracy and save time

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Gshepherd

1727 posts in 1666 days


#5 posted 11-08-2014 08:07 PM

I know interior doors are a whole diffrent creature. I did a search on the Bosch hinge jig and I am getting the impression they are no longer making it.

I was hoping for some guys on here who have made quite a few doors to step up. I do appreciate the responses recieved already. It is just one of those jobs I want to exceed expectations and get it right the first time.

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

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Scottlj

81 posts in 1182 days


#6 posted 11-09-2014 04:40 AM

I’ve used a Milescraft Door Hinge Mortise kit. It does give you accuracy / precision, but I didn’t find it the easiest thing to use.

Just the other day I’d come across this…
http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?cat=1,43000&p=40219

Way overkill for what I was doing, (fixing a couple of doors), but for what you’re talking about, may be worthwhile.

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Gshepherd

1727 posts in 1666 days


#7 posted 11-09-2014 01:02 PM

ScottJ, thanks the lee valley one would be a good investment,

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

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levan

472 posts in 2444 days


#8 posted 11-11-2014 03:40 PM

The line of thinking on laminating, is that you should use a odd number of lamination’s such as 3-5. I have used both laminated and solid being interior, either works well. The biggest thing is to get everything straight and flat, either way you go. That requires a good jointer and planer. A molder by itself does not give flat enough results( imo). I always found when doing solid doors this thickness, you need to buy 10/4 material for the best yield. We always sized the lumber down in stages to relieve any stresses and that it could acclimate before final glue up. In the end I always found solid to be more time efficient to make.
During final glue up, I always found that it is critical having everything flat to avoid any twisting. As far as glue we always used tite-bond.
I would suggest you make the templates for the arches and story sticks for cutting list. A lot of times I even made my own hinge templates, they are so easy to make with 1/2” ply.
Another thought is that these will be extremely heavy doors and you will need to consider using bearing hinges.

http://www.amazon.com/PORTER-CABLE-59381-Hinge-Butt-Template/dp/B0000224KV/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1415545308&sr=8-5&keywords=door+hinge+router+jig

http://www.boringjigs.com/product-category/kits/boring-jig-kit/

Hope this helps
best wishes Lynn

-- "If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing, you're right". Henry Ford

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

3187 posts in 2241 days


#9 posted 11-11-2014 04:01 PM

These are interior doors not exterior, lamination should not be required.

If you want the least movement, use quarter sawn wood for rails and stiles, flat sawn for the panels. This will look really nice as well

Measure and check for square of all the frames—- first. Fix that. Freud has a really nice set of router bits – a little pricey but for over a dozen doors, it is nominal.

Titebond II is a good adhesive for this application.

I use really sharp chisels for the hinge mortises. Make 1 full size door out of poplar first (do not glue it together) then a miniature door out of maple before making the set. This does two things, you have a template and you see how the maple will work for you.

It is much better refining what you are doing with poplar than maple.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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dbray45

3187 posts in 2241 days


#10 posted 11-11-2014 04:06 PM

Using quarter sawn rails and stiles, the door will never twist. If your cuts are not spot on, the door will have a twist.

Use 3/4 panels and allow for movement.

Use 4-5 hinges and make sure your jamb will hold the weight, these could weight in at 150lbs or better.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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Gshepherd

1727 posts in 1666 days


#11 posted 11-11-2014 04:53 PM

Now this is what I’m talkin about…. Some darn good advise….

Very good points and I agree… I told my contractor I wanted a whole month to do tihese 13-14 doors just so I could size up my stock let it sit for a few days, run through the sander/planer to make sure everythig is perfectly flat and stable. I figured once perfect flat I would run through the moulder for final sizing only taking less than 1/4 all the way around. Stiles I would run through the moulder and rails through the shaper. 10/4 material, I will use that. I should be on the right path here….

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

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dbray45

3187 posts in 2241 days


#12 posted 11-11-2014 05:06 PM

There are a few other things -

use spacer balls around the panels, they are NEVER glued.

You will want to tell your carpenter about the weight and speak with him about the hinge placements, he has the measurements from the top down and give him 4 hinges, he may want to do the jams and other hardware. The poplar door will be a good model to take on site and let the customer see how the doors will look and feel. It is better to do this with a mock-up than a $200 piece of maple, just to make the rails and stiles a different size.

-- David in Damascus, MD

View levan's profile

levan

472 posts in 2444 days


#13 posted 11-11-2014 08:14 PM

I have never used the domino mortiser, we did purchase a used machine a few years back for about 6k and they are a dream. If you make a lot of case work,and have the room, it doesn’t take long for pay back.

http://www.machinesales.com/machinery/mortisers/0000074897

best wishes
Lynn

-- "If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing, you're right". Henry Ford

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dbray45

3187 posts in 2241 days


#14 posted 11-11-2014 08:20 PM

I use mortising chisels. They take a little practice but they work quickly, the setup takes about a second (choose the right size), takes a minute or two to cut the square mortises, and you can change the setup very quickly (move the chisel). Oh, and they cost around $120.00 and are easier to sharpen.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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John Mills

4 posts in 1 day


#15 posted 12-06-2016 05:31 PM

I just joined Lumberjocks to post exactly this question. Glad I searched first! To quote GShepard: “Now this is what I’m talkin about…. Some darn good advise….”.

I like the idea of a prototype – especially since I’ve only done cabinet doors before. I’m going to make interior doors. While I’m leaning toward quarter sawn for rails and stiles I’d appreciate some more details on the idea of lamination to address twisting. How many layers for a 1 3/8 in stile? Does one alternate grain direction in the layers?

Thanks,

John

Otterbein, Indiana

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