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Forum topic by 3285jeff posted 11-07-2014 12:33 PM 1304 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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3285jeff

152 posts in 1181 days


11-07-2014 12:33 PM

can anyone tell me their option of getting a chuck,,,i have been trying to do some researching on them and all seem very nice,,actually I lean towards the easy chuck but they are so much more expensive than other I have seen,,and I am getting this for a mini lathe also,,thank you


11 replies so far

View gtbuzz's profile

gtbuzz

427 posts in 1905 days


#1 posted 11-07-2014 01:43 PM

I have an Easy Chuck and I absolutely love it. It’s a very well made chuck and the snap lock jaws are an absolute joy to use. The difference in time in changing out the jaws is around 15 seconds vs. a few minutes. For someone like me that only does it occasionally, it’s really not that much of a time savings, however the old screw on jaws was just enough of a PITA for me to avoid doing it as often as possible. Not the case with the Easy Chuck (YMMV, obviously). The zoom ring is nice, but there’s also a fair bit of friction to it, so while it certainly beats having to use a chuck key for large size changes, it’s not like you can just flick it and have it close either. The snap lock jaws are a much better selling point IMO.

Additionally, their customer service is absolutely top notch. I sent in an email to their tech support about a problem I was having with the chuck. There’s a locking pin that holds the last jaw mount onto the chuck that needs to be removed if you want to get to the scroll mechanism to clean it out, and I was having a real difficulty getting this pin out. I received an email from the president of the company apologizing and he offered to send me a brand new one if I sent him mine back so they could figure out what was wrong with it and avoid any production issues in the future (postage paid both ways). THAT is service.

As it turns out, it was my cheap-o center punch set that was the issue, the one I needed to use was slightly oversized vs what it was supposed to be. That went in the garbage and I got a better one that had no issues.

I also bought my chuck before they started including the screw chuck. Sent them an email asking where I could buy the screw chuck, they said don’t worry about it and just sent me one in the mail free of charge. Again, the company certainly does care about keeping their customers happy.

You’re right though, the one downside is that it’s very expensive. My train of thought is this – if you can afford it and it’s not gonna hurt your pocketbook, go for it. You’ll really be happy with it. If buying this means you don’t buy something else… then that’s when I might start to think twice about it, because while the features of the Easy Chuck are very nice, there are plenty of other chucks out there (the Delta Nova G3 and PSI Barracuda come to mind) that are also quality chucks and do the exact same thing, but just get there in a different way.

For whatever it’s worth, I’m using mine on a midi lathe (Delta 46-460). I’ve spent far more on turning tools than I have on the lathe itself; that’s pretty much unavoidable though.

If you do go with the Easy Chuck, I’m sure you’ll be happy with it.

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

271 posts in 764 days


#2 posted 11-07-2014 02:20 PM

From what I have heard the Easy chuck sounds real nice; Nova has a similar Infinity on Amazon for about $260.

If you go with a standard chuck I would go with insert type in the event you ever decide to get a larger lathe. At least in the Nova line, the G3-D (made for Delta) and the G3 for the Comet are direct threaded and do not accept an insert; I would go with the insert type. While nice, for many people it is too costly to convert over (I have 4 G3’s and 3 SN’s and SN2’s).

Starting out with the Easy or the Infinity should save you money down the road.
The only drawback is some folks like to leave projects mounted while working on another and you can’t do that with the quick change. I never do that myself even though I have several chucks.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View Minorhero's profile

Minorhero

372 posts in 2068 days


#3 posted 11-07-2014 03:01 PM

All the chucks I have seen have essentially identical function with the exception of 3 jaw bs 4 jaw. Get the 4 jaw. Beyond that they all do the same work. The only thing to consider is how much you want to spend. I own a oneway talon because I have an odd spindle size and their chuck can work on my machine without an adapter. Its a great chuck and does the job but is expensive.

The only other thing to consider is if you are going to upgrade your lathe anytime soon. Its silly to buy a mini lathe chuck now if in a year you are going to want to be turning large bowls on a full size lathe. Better to buy a full size chuck that can be used on either.

View gtbuzz's profile

gtbuzz

427 posts in 1905 days


#4 posted 11-07-2014 07:24 PM


The only other thing to consider is if you are going to upgrade your lathe anytime soon. Its silly to buy a mini lathe chuck now if in a year you are going to want to be turning large bowls on a full size lathe. Better to buy a full size chuck that can be used on either.

- Minorhero

I second this. My one regret is that I bought the 1×8 chuck. If I ever move up to a larger lathe (who am I kidding, if, that should read when) it’s likely to have a 1.25×8 spindle. I can always buy an adapter to go from 1.25 to 1 but in hindsight, it probably would have been better to buy the larger chuck and have an adaptor for the smaller spindle rather than the other way around.

The one drawback of that is that you lose some of the length of your max turnings to the length required for the spindle adaptor. I wouldn’t worry about this if you end up getting a chuck in the $150 range though.

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7913 posts in 1843 days


#5 posted 11-07-2014 08:38 PM

Most people are happy with whatever chuck they have so as long as you stick with one of the popular brands there shouldn’t be any problem.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View jfoobar's profile

jfoobar

39 posts in 794 days


#6 posted 11-07-2014 09:40 PM


I second this. My one regret is that I bought the 1×8 chuck. If I ever move up to a larger lathe (who am I kidding, if, that should read when) it s likely to have a 1.25×8 spindle. I can always buy an adapter to go from 1.25 to 1 but in hindsight, it probably would have been better to buy the larger chuck and have an adaptor for the smaller spindle rather than the other way around.

In terms of avoiding buying a second chuck, yes, but that is the only drawback. The general consensus is the best move is to use the appropriately-sized chuck for the piece, not the lathe. I own a Powermatic 3520B and own a Oneway Talon and a Stronghold chuck. I still use the Talon far more often than the Stronghold because most of the pieces I turn don’t need the larger chuck. I keep my tenon/recess smaller and have more access to the bottom of the piece with the smaller chuck.


The one drawback of that is that you lose some of the length of your max turnings to the length required for the spindle adaptor. I wouldn t worry about this if you end up getting a chuck in the $150 range though.

I guess this must be an issue with some chucks but mainstream chucks like the Oneways and the Novas use inserts, which are not very expensive, and do not affect the length of the chuck. The only thing I use my 1 1/4” to 1” spindle adapter for is for is so that I can continue to use my old 1” faceplates, of which I have many.

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2410 posts in 1978 days


#7 posted 11-07-2014 10:24 PM

Years ago, when my wife bought me my Powermatic 3520, I had to buy a chuck that was decent. I went straight for the Stronghold. Never looked back…

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

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SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3048 days


#8 posted 11-07-2014 11:50 PM

I recently sold my complete chuck set,and rebought a complete new axminster power tools precison chuck.Now the newer version from mine has a stainless steel body which I would prefer.The reason I went with this is that their jaws are all made in store with a cnc lathe and are very reasonably priced compared to other makers.I find that no matter which chuck you buy out of the good ones on offer the accessory jaws are too expensive.
Now with the axminster you can buy more or less a full set and use them with several bodies for different lathes. I bought two of their chucks with backplates which fit both of my wood lathes.I had to make one of their backplates to my own thread spec in my own shop with a set tap dies I bought ouch expensive,beacause the didn’t make that thread size at the time.Now for a price they will make to order whatever thread sizes you need.Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

View hairy's profile

hairy

2384 posts in 2995 days


#9 posted 11-08-2014 04:50 PM

Size the chuck to your lathe. Don’t put a big chuck on a small lathe. I have Oneway chucks. They recommend Stronghold for 16” and bigger swing, Talon for under 16”. Stronghold weighs 8 lbs, Talon is 3.5 lbs.

http://www.oneway.ca/index.php?option=com_virtuemart&page=shop.browse&category_id=81&Itemid=2

-- stay thirsty my friends...

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

4997 posts in 3126 days


#10 posted 11-08-2014 08:48 PM

+1 on hairy’s recommendation.

While there may be some benefit in buying a chuck that you can move to a bigger lathe down the road, putting an 8-pound chuck on a mini or midi lathe doesn’t make much sense to me.

Also, if you buy a big, expensive chuck now, what would you do in the future if one of the manufacturers comes out with a new feature that you just can’t live without?

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1882 posts in 1598 days


#11 posted 11-09-2014 02:10 PM

When buying a chuck for a mini lathe weight and size of the chuck matter. The why already covered by Hairy & Gerry. Also your chuck buying budget do not have to break the bank. Since do not know size of your spindle thread will assume it is 1” x 8 TPI for sake of discussion, you can adjust if necessary.

Generally, tommy bar chucks ideal for mini lathes due to weight and thin chuck bodies. Some people have trouble with tommy bars.

Key chucks simpler to operate and more popular with turners; if get right size weight not a problem.

Here are two examples of inexpensive 4-jaw chucks that will work well on a mini lathe. Grizzly’s H6265 lot more attractive.
http://www.grizzly.com/catalog/2014/Main/141

Grizzly’s G8784 1” x 8 TPI tommy bar chuck only $58 without shipping on page 141 of 2014 catalog.
Grizzly H6265, 3 ¾” single key same thread size $112 also on page 141.

Other inexpensive chucks out there sold by

Nova
http://www.teknatool.com/products/Chucks/Midi/Nova_Midi_Chuck.htm
http://www.teknatool.com/products/Chucks/G3/Nova_G3_Chuck.htm

Penn State
http://www.pennstateind.com/store/CUG3418CCX.html
http://www.pennstateind.com/store/CSC500K.html

-- Bill

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