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What is this square called

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Forum topic by Jim Jakosh posted 11-06-2014 08:04 PM 1415 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jim Jakosh

17113 posts in 2565 days


11-06-2014 08:04 PM

A friend of mine found this square buried in the ground when digging around Baldwin, Mi. and asked me what it might be used for. Right off I could see it would be useful at making parallel lines at 1/8” increments. The end looks like it might be a protractor of some kind and the thin bar in the middle moves but not very far right now. Most likely it is blocked with rust. I can read Ballade Drop forged on it and Ballard, Wash.

Does anyone know what it is called? Who made it? When it might have been made and what are all it’s functions?
Thanks, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!


22 replies so far

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Jim Jakosh

17113 posts in 2565 days


#1 posted 11-06-2014 08:18 PM

I may have answered my own question.
I found this on patents of this square by Albert Watson Hight of Ballard , Wa.:

http://www.google.com/patents/US825727

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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Don W

17955 posts in 2027 days


#2 posted 11-06-2014 08:20 PM

that’s pretty cool. I’ve never seen one before.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

13712 posts in 2078 days


#3 posted 11-06-2014 08:43 PM

That bevel function is definitely unique. Too bad that arm is missing from yours. Still a great piece.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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AnonymousRequest

861 posts in 1008 days


#4 posted 11-06-2014 09:02 PM

That’s way cool. I’ve never seen one either. It would be handy to have to scribe with.

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stefang

15512 posts in 2794 days


#5 posted 11-06-2014 09:04 PM

Looks like a pretty smart tool Jim, so it was fun to see.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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doubleDD

5212 posts in 1503 days


#6 posted 11-06-2014 09:55 PM

I would call it a great find. Looks to be a very useful tool. You just don’t see craftsmanship like this anymore

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

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Jim Jakosh

17113 posts in 2565 days


#7 posted 11-06-2014 10:40 PM

The patent application was made in 1905 and the tool says patent applied for so it might be a tool from 1900 or so.
Hi Smitty I soaked it in Cyclo brand rust remover and penetrant and I got the arm to fold out very easily. If you look in the 4th shot , you can see the pointed end of the arm. That is the protractor and there are graduations on the rounded end but pretty rusty right now. I just found out what the piece in the middle with the hole in it does. It is the lock for that bevel are because it has an offset in it as stated in the patent application:

“1. A square comprising a stock formed of IOO two side plates spaced apart, a blade attached to one end of the stock, a beveling device pivotally mounted adjacent to the other end and adapted to fold’between the side plates of the stock, a lever lying between said side plates of the stock and fulcrumed thereon, and having an offset end received in a cavity in one of the side plates of the stock, said cavity being adjacent to a part of the beveling device to permit the offset portion of the lever to enter the cavity and engage between the wall thereof and said part of the beveling device to lock the beveling device in position. “

I think Bruce has quite a find here!!
Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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NorwegianLogger

11 posts in 764 days


#8 posted 11-06-2014 11:54 PM

That’s a cool thing, seems pretty handy!

-- http://howtofellatree.com

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summerfi

3315 posts in 1147 days


#9 posted 11-07-2014 12:05 AM

Found here: http://www.greatplanestrading.com/HUM12/HUM12-1.htm

-- Bob, Missoula, MT -- Rocky Mountain Saw Works http://www.rmsaws.com/p/about-us.html

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BobWemm

1802 posts in 1386 days


#10 posted 11-07-2014 01:19 AM

Very interesting find.

Bob.

-- Bob, Western Australia, The Sun came up this morning, what a great start to the day. Now it's up to me to make it even better. I've cut this piece of wood 4 times and it's still too damn short.

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Joe Lyddon

9431 posts in 3512 days


#11 posted 11-07-2014 01:57 AM

I think it is an…

” I Square “

:)

COOL lil square… very good design for it’s time…

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

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scrollingmom

1090 posts in 1923 days


#12 posted 11-07-2014 01:57 AM

Cool find of a tool. The place that my husband and I bought, we have a running talley on who finds a tool. Course ours are not as old at that yet. I’m still hopeful.

-- Kelly, Allen,KS

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CFrye

8732 posts in 1299 days


#13 posted 11-07-2014 04:43 AM

Great find, Jim! Are you going to finish restoring it or your friend? Fun to find and research old tools and bring them back to life.

-- God bless, Candy

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Jim Jakosh

17113 posts in 2565 days


#14 posted 11-07-2014 04:15 PM

Hi Bob, that is the same square right there that you posted. And that auction is just full of vintage tools!!!

Hi Kelly. I can’t imagine digging one of them up in the yard like that!! it is sure neat to discover old tools like this!! I hope you find some in your new house!!

Hi Candy. Bruce said he will restore it. I just put the Cyclo to it and got it all moving again!

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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Grumpymike

1914 posts in 1775 days


#15 posted 11-07-2014 04:36 PM

Hey Jim,
Great find there. Ballard is now part of Seattle, located between Queen Anne hill, and Crown hill and Phinney ridge to the northern side of the downtown area.
The Lake Washington Ship Canal passes thru the area with the Chiltondon (sp) Locks to the western end exiting to Puget Sound.
With a high percentage of Norse population, Ballard attracted many fine craftsmen of all the trades, carpenters and boat builders are just a few.
There are foundries, dry docks, boat builders, cabinet makers, machine shops and the like all through out the Ballard area still today. As a kid, oh so many years ago, I worked for the Warehouser(sp) saw mill that was there.
Just thought you might want a bit about Ballard.

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it. ... Surprise Az.

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