LumberJocks

Spline sled / jig help

  • Advertise with us

« back to Jigs & Fixtures forum

Forum topic by athomas5009 posted 11-05-2014 03:38 AM 794 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View athomas5009's profile

athomas5009

293 posts in 1078 days


11-05-2014 03:38 AM

Topic tags/keywords: jig question joining

Hi all ATM I’m working on a spline sled to complement my box joint jig so I can make a variety of boxes for the holidays. I decided to go with a traditional sled style jig with 2 runners so it could accommodate larger boxes if needed. Going with the full sled style spline jig seemed to complicate things more than I anticipated. Assembling everything at 45 and square was a bit of a challenge with only one set of hands.

All I have left to do is assemble the far side fence and supports, which I anticipate will go smoother with the other in place. After checking the first fence with an angle finder it looks like I’m at 44.5 deg. How much does this .5 deg matter when it comes to spline jigs?

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.


5 replies so far

View muleskinner's profile

muleskinner

880 posts in 1898 days


#1 posted 11-05-2014 04:17 AM

Speaking for myself, I could probably live with it. Assuming the completed jig is going to be a nuts on 90 degrees the other fence will be 45.5 degrees. I think the only way you’re going to notice a 1 degree difference is to measure the two sides of the spline with a mic or caliper. You could probably do some trig beforehand to tell you how much more exposure the 44.5 side will have. Somebody with a trig table handy could probably give us the answer.

-- Visualize whirled peas

View muleskinner's profile

muleskinner

880 posts in 1898 days


#2 posted 11-05-2014 04:34 AM

I just realized I’m on a computer so I guess that makes me someone with a trig table handy. Looks to me that if you’re splineing the corners of a box made of half in stock and only cut your spline as deep as your miter joint then your talking about a difference of less than .01 inches. Like I said above, I could probably live with that.

-- Visualize whirled peas

View athomas5009's profile

athomas5009

293 posts in 1078 days


#3 posted 11-05-2014 02:04 PM

I had a feeling it wasn’t anything to dwell over plus I figure if it ends up being something that does bother me enough I can probably take care of it with a well placed piece of thin none slip drawer liner.

Now I have to figure out a repeatable method / jig for achieving perfect bevels on my table saw. My miter saw is a HF 12” SCM and I doubt I can get it accurate enough.

-- Sometimes you're flush and sometimes you're bust, and when you're up, it's never as good as it seems, and when you're down, you never think you'll be up again, but life goes on.

View muleskinner's profile

muleskinner

880 posts in 1898 days


#4 posted 11-05-2014 03:53 PM

I hear ‘ya on the perfect miters. Seems like no matter how much measuring and fiddling I did with the TS tilt, it was never perfect. For small to medium boxes I’ve pretty much given up on my table saw and use a router with a 45 degree bevel bit.

-- Visualize whirled peas

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2151 days


#5 posted 11-06-2014 01:16 AM

The digital angle gauge was the answer to perfect miters on the tablesaw for me. A great investment @~$20.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com