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Finish options on Cherry

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Forum topic by Joel_B posted 11-04-2014 11:36 PM 965 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Joel_B

294 posts in 845 days


11-04-2014 11:36 PM

I am starting work on a cherry bed frame and looking for a finish with the following attributes:

1. Not extremely labor intensive.

2. Reduces or eliminates blotching.

3. Moderately durable.

4. Non toxic when cured, doesn’t smell for a long time while curing.

5. Natural looking

So far I have tried on some scraps Arm R Seal and thought it was just ok, I did get some blotching.
I used satin for all coats and now understand I should have used gloss for all coats except the last.

I bought a sample can of Waterlox because I liked some pictures of pieces done with it.
However I read that it can smell for 2 or 3 months while curing which is not an option in a bedroom.

I am thinking other option might be BLO, shellac or Charles Neil Pre Conditioner with just poly like general finishes top coat. I used top coat recently on some Baltic birch plywood and it like the stuff it is absolutely clear which may or may not be good in this case.

I am not trying to achieve the absolute best looking finish for Cherry, just one that is good enough and meets my criteria.

Thanks

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA


22 replies so far

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Minorhero

372 posts in 2069 days


#1 posted 11-04-2014 11:47 PM

Arm-R-Seal works really well. The first coat on cherry always looks blotchy. Go back and do a 2nd and 3rd coat and you will find it very consistent looking. I used it recently for a dining room table and bench and it worked great. I also used satin.

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distrbd

2227 posts in 1910 days


#2 posted 11-04-2014 11:48 PM

Tung oil,that’s it,Cherry will get deeper in color as it ages.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

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Joel_B

294 posts in 845 days


#3 posted 11-04-2014 11:58 PM



Tung oil,that s it,Cherry will get deeper in color as it ages.

- distrbd

What exactly do mean exactly by Tung Oil, there are many products that contain tung oil such as the Waterlox I mentioned. Additives are used to make it more durable, waterproof.

Maybe you are talking about pure tung oil like this?

http://www.leevalley.com/us/Wood/page.aspx?p=20049&cat=1,190,42942

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

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Joel_B

294 posts in 845 days


#4 posted 11-05-2014 12:01 AM



Arm-R-Seal works really well. The first coat on cherry always looks blotchy. Go back and do a 2nd and 3rd coat and you will find it very consistent looking. I used it recently for a dining room table and bench and it worked great. I also used satin.

- Minorhero

I did do at least 3 coats. Got a little bit of wiping marks and some dull areas. Some 340 grit between coats seemed to help. Maybe using the gloss and more practice would help.

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

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Case101

107 posts in 1257 days


#5 posted 11-05-2014 12:03 AM

Check out waterlox

-- John, New Jersey

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Joel_B

294 posts in 845 days


#6 posted 11-05-2014 12:15 AM



Check out waterlox

- Case101

I have sample can which i will be trying out soon.
Concerned about reports that it smells bad for months.
If I could I would just leave it to cure in the garage for a few months but it has to be in the bedroom asap.

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

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distrbd

2227 posts in 1910 days


#7 posted 11-05-2014 12:27 AM

I’m not familiar with Waterlox.
I use Circa 1850 Polymerized tung oil which is most likely the same as :
http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=20050&cat=1,190,42942
The table,kitchen island, I built 6 months ago is already deep red ,2-3 times darker than before,in my humble opinion ,cherry looks best on it’s own without any stains,dyes,etc.
I also has good result mixing tung oil with Spar varnish (50/50) and 25% paint thinner/mineral spirits.but it smells for a week.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

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Joel_B

294 posts in 845 days


#8 posted 11-05-2014 12:31 AM



I use Circa 1850 Polymerized tung oil which is most likely the same as :
http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=20050&cat=1,190,42942
The table,kitchen island, I built 6 months ago is already deep red ,2-3 times darker than before,in my humble opinion ,cherry looks best on it s own without any stains,dyes,etc.
I also has good result mixing tung oil with Spar varnish (50/50) and 25% paint thinner/mineral spirits.

- distrbd

Would it make sense to put a coat of poly over it to make it more durable / waterproof ?
I agree with the no stains or dyes.

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

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CharlesA

3022 posts in 1262 days


#9 posted 11-05-2014 12:32 AM

There are lots of options, Arm-r-Seal shouldn’t be judged after a couple coats—and the cherry will darken and even out (with all blotching gone) significantly over a couple of weeks—and be beautiful. Cherry is a difficult wood to demand that it look in final form immediately.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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Case101

107 posts in 1257 days


#10 posted 11-05-2014 12:33 AM

Maybe thin out the poly into a wiping finish?

-- John, New Jersey

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distrbd

2227 posts in 1910 days


#11 posted 11-05-2014 12:59 AM

Would it make sense to put a coat of poly over it to make it more durable / waterproof ?

- Joel_B


I will let others with more experience answer that question,I only know tung oil and spar varnish works and also gives some protection ,but the smell was not pleasant so it would not be advisable to apply it on a bed frame.
I would imagine WB poly could be used after a week or once the oil is dried.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2154 days


#12 posted 11-05-2014 01:22 AM

I’m a big fan of shellac and find it MUCH more durable than others say. I might be hesitant to use shellac on a high use tabletop but otherwise I use it on most of my stuff. I rub all of my shellac on and find it an idiot proof finish.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Minorhero

372 posts in 2069 days


#13 posted 11-05-2014 02:45 AM

Arm-R-Seal needs to be rubbed down with steel wool or very fine sand paper between coats. I used 0000 steel wool and that worked quite well.

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runswithscissors

2189 posts in 1489 days


#14 posted 11-05-2014 02:59 AM

I like water based acrylic. Dries to touch in 1/2 hour, recoat in 2 hours. You have to sand lightly between coats, as it raises the grain. It has a very mild odor that goes away quickly. I used semi gloss on my oak kitchen cabinets, and it has been very satisfactory. Spray or brush

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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Duckster

355 posts in 815 days


#15 posted 11-05-2014 03:45 AM

I use a sealer and then 4 or 5 coats of lacquer.

-- Duckster, Texas. {Any day of fishing, Beats a good day at work.} Wash your feet and love Jesus

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