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Cutting large MDF without bandsaw.

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Forum topic by NickelCity posted 11-03-2014 06:50 PM 944 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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NickelCity

9 posts in 762 days


11-03-2014 06:50 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I’m a sawdust making hobbyiest at the moment. I hope to become more in the future, but that’s a different post. I don’t have a workshop of my own because I live in a townhouse. I make use of a public use workshop on a close by Coast Guard base. I love it there, it’s decked out with Powermatic machines that is something that I aspire to have in my own shop one day.

On to my problem: I glue 14 MDF layers, each 12” x 18” together, creating a massive block of MDF. I plan on cutting out a design to use as form for bending plywood. I would like to keep both the top and bottom of the form intact to assist in glue ups. I was going to cut it on the bandsaw but there’s my problem. The blade on the bandsaw is in rough shape and won’t be able to make the cut I need. Since it is a government owned space, replacing it will take a long time, more time than I have. Is there another way I can make this cut? An oversized coping saw comes to mind.

Sorry for the large amount of words… short story, need to cut a 12” x 18” x 8.75” (L x W x H) without a bandsaw.


9 replies so far

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Tedstor

1625 posts in 2094 days


#1 posted 11-03-2014 07:05 PM

Can’t you just buy a $15-20 blade and slap it on the machine? Seems like a small price to pay to finish your project.
I used the hobby shops on the USMC bases I was stationed on. I had my own general purpose blade that I’d slap on the table saw when I used it. Otherwise, I was stuck using a blade that had been on the saw since the Carter administration.

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bondogaposis

4024 posts in 1812 days


#2 posted 11-03-2014 07:05 PM

Is it a straight cut or curved? The bandsaw is going to be by far the best tool for cutting something that thick. I would go w/ Tedstor’s suggestion as the least painful option.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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NickelCity

9 posts in 762 days


#3 posted 11-03-2014 07:12 PM

I honestly never thought of that. It is a curved cut and I agree that the bandsaw will be the best. I’ll bring it up to the people at the front desk and see if that’s an option. Thanks.

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Tedstor

1625 posts in 2094 days


#4 posted 11-03-2014 07:13 PM

Oh- and don’t forget to take the blade home with you when you leave (like I did).
You’ll come back to find that some numbskull used your blade to cut ceramic tile or plate steel.

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Tedstor

1625 posts in 2094 days


#5 posted 11-03-2014 07:15 PM



I honestly never thought of that. It is a curved cut and I agree that the bandsaw will be the best. I ll bring it up to the people at the front desk and see if that s an option. Thanks.

- NickelCity

Ask for forgiveness, not permission. There’s probably some DoD/DHS regulation that prevents a non-union-made blade from being installed on a machine except for on the 3rd Wednesday of the month….or something like that.
Just my .02.

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2705 days


#6 posted 11-03-2014 07:17 PM

I would check with whoever oversees the shop and tell him what you would like to do. I’m sure he would have no objection to your putting a new blade on the saw.

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NickelCity

9 posts in 762 days


#7 posted 11-03-2014 07:19 PM



Ask for forgiveness, not permission. There s probably some DoD/DHS regulation that prevents a non-union-made blade from being installed on a machine except for on the 3rd Wednesday of the month….or something like that.
Just my .02.

- Tedstor

Thats what has me thinking in a different direction at the start. After my time in the Navy and then working in the Federal Government, the bureaucracy wears you down after a bit.

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Tedstor

1625 posts in 2094 days


#8 posted 11-03-2014 07:25 PM

Yep. Tell me about it. I’m worn down to an iddy, biddy nub.

Of course, you might also want to ask the shop if they happen to have a new blade lying around that they’ve been meaning to install. It wouldn’t surprise me if they didn’t have a pallet of 50 of them that they bought with leftover money they had to burn before the end of the fiscal year. And if the guys that run your shop are anything like the guys that ran mine…..you’ll have to show them what a bandsaw even is before they can begin to look for the blade.

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NickelCity

9 posts in 762 days


#9 posted 11-03-2014 07:28 PM

Yea, there’s one guy that knows his way around in there, but it’s joined with the auto hobby repair shop and the desk personnel is clearly weighted more towards that end. Any time I ask something or let them know that a bearing on their $1800 planer is going out, I get a blank stare…

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