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Restoring an Emco Woodworker Table Saw

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Forum topic by FOehl posted 11-03-2014 02:51 PM 1411 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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FOehl

3 posts in 760 days


11-03-2014 02:51 PM

Topic tags/keywords: table saw restoration rust advice clean service emco

Hello Everyone, I’ve just come into possession of an Emco WoodworkerKS80 table saw and could really do with some tips and guidance on getting it up and running as it should. I’m a novice woodworker and have never owned or used a table saw before, so it’s a bit daunting!

The table saw in question came from a school that was closing down its wood shop about 2-3 years ago, and since then it’s been sitting in the corridor at work. a couple of weeks ago my boss decided it was time to get rid of it so I said I’d take it off his hands.

It looks in fairly good nick, with no rust or apparent damage to the cast iron table top, but other parts of the hardware have some light rust (nothing too deeply pitted though by the looks of it). The combination blade raise/lower and tilt is very stiff though, and the wheel will not push in/pull out to engage for altering the blade angle

I bought a single to three phase inverter so I could turn the thing on and it fires up okay with no obvious blade wobble or dangerous sounds. When I tried a quick test cut with it though, the blade quickly got bogged down and a little smoke appeared, so I shut it off and decided that it could probably do with a full service and clean before trying to use it.

I’d really appreciate any advice anyone can give to a newbie on how to approach servicing this thing and getting it up and running as it looks like a really nice saw. Advice on what bits and bobs would be useful for cleaning rust off cast iron etc. would also be massively appreciated.


6 replies so far

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Planeman40

805 posts in 2220 days


#1 posted 11-04-2014 06:05 PM

That is a European made saw from Austria. I have an Emco Maximat metal lathe I bought back in 1969. Emco made good stuff. If you live in the USA I am a little surprised you found it here. As long as the “smoke” is not coming from the motor you are O.K. I think most likely the smoke is coming from the friction between the blade and the wood. This is common with blades that need to be cleaned from rust and tree gum. Take the blade off and spray it with some oven cleaner. Let it sit for about 20 minutes and use an old tooth brush or something like it to clean the blade off. Rinse the blade with water, dry it thoroughly and give it a light spray with WD-40 to keep it from rusting. If the blade has rust on it, use some fine sandpaper like 320 grit or higher or some steel wool to remove the rust. Then spray with WD-40. A little smoke and some burning seen on the cut is commonly seen when cutting hardwood with a dirty or dull blade.

My way of removing light rust is to”wet” sand using fine “wet or dry” sandpaper (has black grit) and light oil or WD-40 as a lubricant. Steel wool works too. Rust can also be removed with a wire brush in an electric hand drill. When you are finished removing rust, spray with WD-40 and let it sit over night. WD-40 is made to force moisture out of pores in metal and leave a thin film of protection. Wipe off the following morning. The film it leaves does not show up on your wood afterwards.

And . . . I suggest that you wire up a separate 3-phase circuit for future tools in you shop. With that converter you can buy great tools at great prices as used 3-phase stuff goes cheap. I wish I had done that when I started out. Watch the tool auctions (do a search on Google) and get the feel of what kind of machines go for what prices. You will only be able to run one machine at a time with the 3-phase circuit setup, but you are going to do that anyway.

Good luck!

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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FOehl

3 posts in 760 days


#2 posted 11-05-2014 12:55 PM

Thanks for the advice Planeman. I’m actually in Hong Kong, not the US, and believe me, I was surprised to see it was an Austrian saw. Pro woodworking tools are like hen’s teeth here. None of the shops sell them because there’s no demand for thing like jointers and table saws, everything is geared towards portable contractor type tools.

You might be right about the smoke coming from the blade. There was a fair amount of pitch coating the teeth. Thankfully very little rust. I’ll give the oven cleaner a go and let you know how it works out.

Thanks for the tip on the 3-phase circuit too, I hadn’t thought of that.

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Loren

8294 posts in 3107 days


#3 posted 11-05-2014 04:00 PM

I concur that it may be just a dull, dirty blade.

Anyway, quite a find.

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FOehl

3 posts in 760 days


#4 posted 11-06-2014 12:50 AM

Thanks. I’m considering replacing the existing 60T blade with a Freud 40T all purpose thin kerf blade. Will that mean I need to change the riving knife too?

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Planeman40

805 posts in 2220 days


#5 posted 11-06-2014 01:56 AM

Measure the riving knife with a micrometer or caliper and find a blade of that width. Otherwise you will most likely need a new riving knife. As long as the knife and the blade are close – withing a few thousandths – you should be O.K. The only need for the riving knife is to keep the just cut wood from closing up and pinching the blade. This happens sometimes when the stresses latent in the wood are released upon cutting and the wood wants to close around the cut. Quite frankly I don’t use a riving knife as I have rarely found the problem over the 50 years I have been woodworking and I find that taking a riving knife on and off to be a pain. But that’s just me. Others see it differently.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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Loren

8294 posts in 3107 days


#6 posted 11-06-2014 02:00 AM

It just has to be narrower than the saw plate, imo. It’s
job is to prevent wood closing up right behind the blade
and causing a kickback. You can put tape or something
on the side if you feel the riving knife is too thin for
a given saw plate, but I kind of doubt it is a benefit
to do so.

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