LumberJocks

I got the cupping out of my live edge walnut table...now what?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Wood & Lumber forum

Forum topic by Liveedgewoodtables posted 11-03-2014 02:49 PM 1892 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Liveedgewoodtables's profile

Liveedgewoodtables

8 posts in 760 days


11-03-2014 02:49 PM

Topic tags/keywords: walnut warping cupping live edge walnut slabs slabs bookmatch bookmatched steam weight bowing bow

I have an 8’ x 40 inch dining table. It is a bookmatched 2 inch thick walnut. It has a terrible cupping problem. Since this picture was taken, I have since got the cupping out. I wet it down and put buckets of sand on top. I also, put a pot of water on a hot plate burner under it. Then I covered it with plastic…...this did the trick!!

But, now what?? How do I keep it from doing it again?

If anyone can give pointers….please let me know.

Thanks,

Bryan

-- Bryan@liveedgewoodtables.com


8 replies so far

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3547 posts in 1227 days


#1 posted 11-03-2014 03:08 PM

Hi Brian. Get some 2×4’s and clamp them to it. You may want to add a few wedges in the middle to cup the board slightly opposite of where it is cupped. Let it dry for a few weeks by standing it on its end with even airflow going on both sides. You also can go ahead and install your apron instead and see it that will correct the problem. I would do the 2×4’s first though.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View Liveedgewoodtables's profile

Liveedgewoodtables

8 posts in 760 days


#2 posted 11-03-2014 04:13 PM

Mr jinx..thanks for your help. One thing I did not add is that I have a homemade kiln that works pretty well. I was wondering if I should put it back in the kiln and then strap and weight it down.

My big question is…what is to keep it from cupping again. Is it possible that the wood will dry out further in the kiln…so much so it will not be able to cup again. I’m assuming cupping is due to moisture in the wood??...take all the moisture out and it ill stop moving (significantly that is…)

Bryan

-- Bryan@liveedgewoodtables.com

View putty's profile

putty

996 posts in 1066 days


#3 posted 11-03-2014 04:22 PM

were your edges square when you did the glue up?
if not maybe you could cut down the glue line and re-square then glue up again.

-- Putty

View Canofworms's profile

Canofworms

103 posts in 961 days


#4 posted 11-03-2014 04:33 PM

I’m not an expert like these other guys, but I did do this breakfast bar below. So, I can safely say I know more than some and less then others.
Mine had been dry for several years before I planed it.

I have three thoughts.
1. Get it dry, or at least let it acclimate for a few weeks in the space it will be then seal it to stop moisture absorption.

I think if you keep soaking and heating and weighting it the way you described you run the risk of splitting

2. Stop trying to bend the board to your will and plain it after it has cupped.

3…. Removed/edited I thought this was one solid slab.

View AnonymousRequest's profile

AnonymousRequest

861 posts in 1008 days


#5 posted 11-03-2014 04:33 PM

When doing glue-ups, I personally, never use pieces wider than 5” or 6”. I always worry about cupping and this has helped me.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1571 posts in 1935 days


#6 posted 11-04-2014 02:15 AM

The cupping indicates that the wood was not in equilibrium with the environment. It cupped because it was either gaining or losing moisture. Most probably losing moisture. When the wood gets in equilibrium with the environment, it will not cup. Keeping it flat while it dries to equilibrium should do the trick. The equilibrium moisture content in your basement and you dining room are probably not the same. If the basement has higher humidity, you might want to get a dehumidifier.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3547 posts in 1227 days


#7 posted 11-04-2014 01:09 PM

I am thinking the cupping occurred because one side was sitting on a surface and thus did not lose moisture as fast as the exposed surface. If you want to put it in the kiln, I think still a good idea to clamp it with 2×4’s and place it on it’s side over some sticker boards so it dries evenly. You will probably face the same problem applying the finish unless you put the finish on the cup side first. Let us know how it turned out as a lot of people face this problem.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1571 posts in 1935 days


#8 posted 11-04-2014 03:28 PM

It is good practice to never place a table top flat down on a workbench or other flat surface. Air should be able to circulate on all sides of the top to prevent the problem described by mrjinx007.

As a result, the top is the last piece I build on project so that it can be attached soon after it is made to avoid having it sit around for days and bad things happening.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com