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Removing a stain and painting with grain visible, advice pls

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Forum topic by Prizen posted 11-02-2014 01:44 PM 770 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Prizen

18 posts in 1381 days


11-02-2014 01:44 PM

Hi all,

I am re-finishing a piece for my mother, it is oak, and stained a dark colour. I wish to remove this finish and paint it a cream or off-white colour, but keep the grain visible.

Please could you help me on the best way to do this. Here are some pics.

Thanks guys!


5 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3932 posts in 1955 days


#1 posted 11-02-2014 02:13 PM

Sanding it off may well leave the pores/grain filled some with the existing finish, minimizing the effect you seek. Using a stripper will also leave some of the existing finish in the pores/grain, but probably not as much. Painting new oak and having grain show is one of the easiest tasks, look closely at the wood with an angled light and see if you can see the grain as you want, if so it will show through the paint if the coats aren’t too heavy.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Prizen

18 posts in 1381 days


#2 posted 11-02-2014 02:49 PM

Thanks so much, will any type of paint do?
Here is what I’m trying to get to;

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3932 posts in 1955 days


#3 posted 11-02-2014 04:11 PM

No, not just any paint. My first choice would be an oil based enamel, though on the piece I would try it first to see if I get the grain effect i was after. It’s possible to put it on so thick the grain won’t show. If you have to stick with a waterborne paint, choose something that’s 100% acrylic. Examples would be Olympic One (Lowes), Behr premium plus (HD) and several from real paint stores like BM Moore Style Interior Acrylic Latex and Pratt and Lambert Accolade. Avoid at all costs anything meant for walls, which is great for the walls but useless for anything else. One last consideration, rattle can paints are typically a lot thinner than anything in a can. Using them might be (a lot) more costly but do more of the look you want.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View retfr8flyr's profile

retfr8flyr

327 posts in 1130 days


#4 posted 11-02-2014 05:29 PM

OP, do you know anyone with an HLVP spray outfit? Spraying is the best way to put on a thin enough coat to make the grain show through. I have had good luck with Olympic One, thinned way down, in my Earlex sprayer.

-- Earl

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Prizen

18 posts in 1381 days


#5 posted 11-02-2014 05:58 PM

Thanks guys, trying to do this relatively cheaply.

I guess I will have to hand sand quite a bit of it, belt sander on the top if the piece.
step two wipe it down with methlayted spirits, then apply a light coat of oil based enamel or acrylic?
unfortunately I’m from Ireland so probably won’t be able to pick up some of those brand names

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