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what to do with an old cast iron cabinet saw?

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Forum topic by SCOTSMAN posted 10-31-2014 07:37 PM 998 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3045 days


10-31-2014 07:37 PM

I think I might have asked this here before but anyway.My son Alistair gave me an old deadweight LOL cast iron table saw.It has currently by good design which has allowed it to been taken to about four or five large pieces for transporting it . It is a good saw belt driven but old. I don’t like the fact that the sawblade approx 12 inches cannot be positioned either up or down.This brought about by way of( I feel) a poor design I have never seen this before even on old saws. Maybe this was accpetable in former times. Although now even though I work as a hobbiest alone,I am not thrilled by this.
I thought of redesigning it and making the top slit wider and fitting a disc so that it could be used as a disc sander even up to sixteen inch disc. Is this a good idea in your opinion? Or before I get started does anyone have a better idea for it’s future use??? Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease


9 replies so far

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PASs

587 posts in 2558 days


#1 posted 10-31-2014 07:58 PM

would like to see pictures…make…model

-- Pete, "It isn't broken, you just aren't using it right."

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Roger

19855 posts in 2263 days


#2 posted 10-31-2014 08:19 PM

I agree with Pete. Pics would be nice

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

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MrUnix

4202 posts in 1658 days


#3 posted 10-31-2014 08:36 PM

I’ve seen a few table saws with a fixed positon blade.. usually larger saws that were used in production furniture shops where precision was critical. Not having to deal with any slop via the tilt/height mechanisms allowed very close tolerances and dead accurate cuts. For a hobbiest/home workshop environment, it is definately overkill. Post them pictures.. would be interesting to identify the beast.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Joe Lyddon

9430 posts in 3512 days


#4 posted 10-31-2014 09:09 PM

Sounds like it’s time to sell it, to me… Unless you have the space to hold the antique… I doubt if it will appreciate in value… but, I don’t know.

Just make sure your son understands Why… LOL

Good luck!

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

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SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3045 days


#5 posted 10-31-2014 09:10 PM

I will tyry to post pictures soon, but you do realise it is currently in four or five pieces in my machining shop. In which case that could be a problem. I will do what I can do?
Many thanks so far guys ,it’s as said an oldy. Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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Loren

8294 posts in 3107 days


#6 posted 10-31-2014 09:17 PM

If all you’re doing is through cuts a blade can
generally be left at full height. The geometry
of the teeth is such that they are more vertical
in their presentation is closer to vertical, like
a band saw sort of and better for cutting all
the way through thick material. In production
cabinet work on large panel saws melamine sheets
are cut 4 or more simultaneously this way
as well. I don’t cut more than one layer
most of the time, but having more capacity
can increase working efficiency.

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buildingmonkey

242 posts in 1007 days


#7 posted 11-01-2014 12:28 PM

It would be interesting to see how old a saw it is. Is there a manufacturer’s name on it? The oldest machines I have seen was at an auction of an old lumberyard, they had a set of machines that ran off a shaft that ran overhead. They all had flat belt pullys, and you tightened the belt for the machine you wanted to run. So they all ran off a single motor. Had heard of that type of machine setups where they were powered by water along a stream using a water wheel.

-- Jim from Kansas

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lndfilwiz

90 posts in 1060 days


#8 posted 11-01-2014 03:49 PM


It would be interesting to see how old a saw it is. Is there a manufacturer s name on it? The oldest machines I have seen was at an auction of an old lumberyard, they had a set of machines that ran off a shaft that ran overhead. They all had flat belt pullys, and you tightened the belt for the machine you wanted to run. So they all ran off a single motor. Had heard of that type of machine setups where they were powered by water along a stream using a water wheel.

- buildingmonkey

In WNY many of the craftsmen in the Amish Community still use this method. Many have small diesel engines outside their shops to run the overhead main shaft.

-- Smile, it makes people wander what you are up to.

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bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2526 days


#9 posted 11-01-2014 05:04 PM

Post pics over at the old wood working tool site. It might be worth more than you think. “OLD” does not equate to worthless

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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