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Forum topic by Michigander posted 10-31-2014 07:22 PM 946 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Michigander

214 posts in 1881 days


10-31-2014 07:22 PM

Topic tags/keywords: box 14 material

I am in need of 1/4” or 5/16” finished tiger maple, curly cherry, figured walnut and other fancy domestic woods. I am making boxes so the wood needs to be nice. Up to now I have had to purchase 4/4 boards and have them planed down to thickness. I hate to waste a nice 4/4 board and use only 1/4 of the wood in the board. My wood needs per box is 6” wide and 5 pieces 22” long. Do you know of a mill that can re-saw thicker boards or otherwise have 1/4” or 5/16” thick boards available?
Thanks,
John


16 replies so far

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

800 posts in 1570 days


#1 posted 10-31-2014 07:32 PM

I know this doesn’t answer your direct question, but do you have a table saw that can cut up to 3” in height (ideally with a thin kerf blade)? If so, you can resaw them yourself by taking a few passes on the table saw, flipping the boards end-for-end to cut from both edges in towards the middle.

For safety I wouldn’t do this without a riving knife in place and featherboards – ideally tall ones – both in front of and behind the blade (with only light pressure behind the blade). And I’d use a push stick that can hold down a fair amount of the length of your boards.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View Gshepherd's profile

Gshepherd

1727 posts in 1663 days


#2 posted 10-31-2014 07:32 PM

I be buying a bandsaw and resaw your 4/4…. Everytime you did it you be saving money by time and lumber cost.

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

6471 posts in 2060 days


#3 posted 10-31-2014 07:58 PM

+1 on the resaw. My retail supplier sells 1/4 S4S type boards, but they are stupid expensive, in my opinion. By resawing you can also do more with book matching nda playing with the grain. Better color/grain matches, perfectly sized. A lot of benefits really.

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3020 posts in 1259 days


#4 posted 10-31-2014 08:13 PM

Check with Bob Kloes.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View ElChe's profile

ElChe

630 posts in 798 days


#5 posted 10-31-2014 08:51 PM

Check with your local lumberyards. I live in a small town but my lumberyard has a horizontal bandsaw and they resaw for me for a nominal price. The boards have to be at least 4 feet long for the powered feed rollers.

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

1944 posts in 1450 days


#6 posted 10-31-2014 09:23 PM

I think that the easiest way to get that thickness is to resaw thicker wood. However, you never know what you may get when you resaw. It may come out flat and stay that way or it may warp, curl and twist. The best bet is to have well dried wood and pray for the best.

View JADobson's profile

JADobson

679 posts in 1573 days


#7 posted 10-31-2014 09:50 PM

I know Lee Valley sells some exotics in 1/4. I’m not sure if they have any domestics, but they would be worth checking.

-- James

View Ub1chris's profile

Ub1chris

85 posts in 842 days


#8 posted 11-01-2014 02:37 AM

Most band saws can re saw 6” easily. Or since it’s only small pieces, warm up your sawing arm, and re saw by hand.

View Michigander's profile

Michigander

214 posts in 1881 days


#9 posted 11-01-2014 09:30 PM

Thanks Guys, I can cut 3” on my table saw so I think I will try that first. However my band saw can cut 6” too but I need a re-saw blade, what blade do you suggest?
Thanks again!
John

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3020 posts in 1259 days


#10 posted 11-01-2014 11:44 PM

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/65143

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1640 posts in 1779 days


#11 posted 11-02-2014 02:48 AM

A 1/2” skip tooth 3tpi blade can resaw 6” wide stock just fine. Going with a wider blade or coarser teeth wouldn’t hurt but it’s not necessary.

Make sure the blade has a really good weld joint. I’m getting mine from RKO Saw in Illinois for about $10 a blade and have been happy with them.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View Michigander's profile

Michigander

214 posts in 1881 days


#12 posted 11-03-2014 06:55 PM

Hey guys I took your advice and tried re-sawing on my table saw. I had a very nice 9/4 board of maple that was just the right length of 25”. I gauged my blade to make sure it was set to 90 degrees. I got 5 nice 1/4” boards, but I found I had a lot of rocking as the board got thinner which caused circular saw marks which are pretty bad. I should have used a tall fence to help stabilize the board while cutting it. as I got thinner, I decided not to try and cut a slab off completely, but instead left 1/4” to hold everything together. I cut the last 1/4” with a hand saw.
Then I realized I had a lot of cleaning up to do so I got my great great grandfathers #6 Stanley fore plane and went to work. I finished up with his # 4 Stanley smoothing plane. I had a lot of tear out with this maple. It’s got a lot of curl so it’s not the easiest stuff to plane. Notice the planning fixture I made to hold the boards. It has a wood guides on the bottom and left sides to register against the bench and the top has boards to plane against. Works great and only took 20 minutes to build with scraps.
Any advice on setting up my planers to plane this curly wood and reduce tear out. I sharpened the blades to 25 degrees and set the cap 1/64” from the blade edge. I set the mouth very tight at less than 1/32”. Maybe this is too tight???
Anyway, re-sawing is a great solution, but using the table saw is too slow and causes a lot of hand planing work. So I think I will get a re-saw blade for my band saw. Thank you all for your suggestions. It will save me money in the end as I can buy thick but short boards. I get matched grain as a bonus!
Thanks,
John

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3020 posts in 1259 days


#13 posted 11-03-2014 07:09 PM

The best advice is to have a spiral head cutter. If, like me, you don’t try these three things (from Bob Kloes who specializes in this type of wood):
1) very thin cuts
2) dampen the surface with water before each pass
3) skew the wood through the planer

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View Michigander's profile

Michigander

214 posts in 1881 days


#14 posted 11-03-2014 07:20 PM

Charles, I must have confused you. I am hand planning as I don’t have a thickness planer, but I wish I did. It makes sense to plane at a skewed angle, which is what I am trying to do with my hand planes.
John

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3020 posts in 1259 days


#15 posted 11-03-2014 07:26 PM

Oh, I thought I saw the word planer in there somewhere, even though I knew you were using hand planes.

I am not a plane expert, but I do use them regularly. I find it very difficult to hand plane figured maple.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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