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Need a little help on edge joining...It's been a while!

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Forum topic by 1371Marine posted 10-31-2014 02:01 AM 1048 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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1371Marine

23 posts in 804 days


10-31-2014 02:01 AM

I’m getting ready to build a bar top out of southern yellow pine. I am to the point of putting these pieces together. I don’t have an edge joiner so I’m relying on the “glue line rip” blade to help me out. Th boards have been planed down to 1-3/8”. With all the new tools and methods these days it can be bothersome to be assured I’m going the right direction. I’ve picked up a plate joiner and biscuits. I also got the Kreg 4 master system. Is it overkill to use both?? Also it’s been so long since I’ve done this. I’m a bit embarrassed to ask, but am I supposed to alternate the grain so it doesn’t warp (ie… crown up, crown down, crown up, etc, etc…). I keep going back in my mind to laying deck boards, all “crown up”. I need a refresher course please. Thanks in advance


12 replies so far

View 2Dusty2's profile

2Dusty2

44 posts in 793 days


#1 posted 10-31-2014 02:30 AM

Hi 137 Marine, I believe that you do alternate the grain to minimize warping. I am assuming that the wood is dry and acclimatized to its new location. When you say the boards have been planned to 1 3/8th” do you mean thickness or width? I assume you mean thickness but then how wide are your boards and how many boards wide will your bar top be? When its finished can I come for a drink?

-- Cheers

View Gshepherd's profile

Gshepherd

1727 posts in 1663 days


#2 posted 10-31-2014 03:35 AM

I do quite a few glueups myself and this is how I determine which acton to take.

If your glueing up a top that would be used as a lid then I would alternate the gran as Dusty mentioned.

If I am glueing up a top that can be secured down to another surface then I arrange the boards which ever way the would look the best. Never had a problem. Now if your lumber is between 6 and 8% moisture your good to go.

I do a dry test fit to see if they all fit perfect then just use glue, no biscuits no kreg. Start in the center and work your way to the ends when clamping, I will end clamp the very ends to help keep flat.

Glue Line Rip blades are good and I usually sneak up and do one pass just kissing the edge. Rub your finger along the edge and you will notice if there is a bad spot. I use a small 2in wide foam paint roller when I have a lot to glue up and on wide material vs the little brushes. Whe your done jut wash out the roller and use it again. Sorry a little winded here hope it helps. I figured it up last year roughly did over 4,000 l.f. of over 1 inch material on glueups. Some for handrails and panels and a few bartops.

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

View wseand's profile

wseand

2754 posts in 2504 days


#3 posted 10-31-2014 04:54 AM

The pocket hole screws and biscuits aren’t necessary but won’t hurt anything. You seem to be on the right track, if you can get a good smooth/square cut from the glue line blade you are golden.
Make sure your blade is square to the table and is parallel to the fence.
Slap some glue on and clamp her up tight and the rest is history.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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1371Marine

23 posts in 804 days


#4 posted 10-31-2014 10:46 AM

The boards are 1-3/8” thick and will end up about 9”-10” wide. Joining two boards to make the top. I felt with just two I would go crown up on both. The seam will fall just about at the front edge of the base so I was a littlle paranoid about it drooping over time. I’m just a little over cautious some times as I hate when a projects ends up a wreck. Hence the questions. The longest boards are about 11”-6”. Some of the boards may be slightly warped from end to end, that is why I was thinking biscuits and screws. I also tend to “go big” and over the top on some things. The top will be secured to an L shaped bar and the base (walls) will end up about 6-1/2” wide for the top to rest on . I’ll secure it with the pocket screws once fitted and set level. Another question I had is: Would you guys 45 the corner joint or butt it?

View BilltheDiver's profile

BilltheDiver

250 posts in 2347 days


#5 posted 10-31-2014 03:15 PM

In my opinion the advantage of using biscuits is primarily to aid in alignment. Sounds like it might be helpful. The pocket screws might be used somewhat in place of clamps since only the top side of the wood will show and the boards are so long. Whether or how you use each of these is purely your choice. Use what you will be comfortable with.

-- "Measure twice, cut once, count fingers"

View Loren's profile

Loren

8301 posts in 3110 days


#6 posted 10-31-2014 03:53 PM

I haven’t exactly tried this to fix and edge.

I think you may be able to glue some course grit
sandpaper to a board like a piece of melamine that
is somewhat immune to warpage. Thus you
would have a “sanding plane” or sanding board.
Cut up belt sander belts work well.

View 1371Marine's profile

1371Marine

23 posts in 804 days


#7 posted 10-31-2014 06:16 PM

I may have mis-spoke. The board is bowed the length of the surface. That is why I thought of going with the biscuits as BilltheDiver mentioned. What are some thoughts on the corner joints?? 45 or butt?? I think the 45 will look better although it may be weaker.

View Gshepherd's profile

Gshepherd

1727 posts in 1663 days


#8 posted 10-31-2014 07:06 PM

I would do a 45 and use these on the bottom. If I remember right I bought the template and bolts at Woodcraft.

-- What we do in life will Echo through Eternity........

View 1371Marine's profile

1371Marine

23 posts in 804 days


#9 posted 10-31-2014 07:12 PM


I would do a 45 and use these on the bottom. If I remember right I bought the template and bolts at Woodcraft.

- Gshepherd

That’s exactly what I was thinking. Darn, now I have to buy more tools. Hope the wife is feeling generous LOL. I’m guessing forstner bit and router for the slot

View B's profile

B

137 posts in 949 days


#10 posted 11-02-2014 11:38 PM

I would 45° the corners and biscuit them together for alignment.As for the slot I think a forstner bit and a chisel are all you would need,but if you get the chance to buy a router it will always come in handy.Hitachi makes very good quality, and inexpensive routers.Bosch and makita make very nice laminate trimmers.

-- A poor workman blames his tools. Mr.B, Ontario Canada - https://www.instagram.com/boysbeit/

View Neptuno's profile

Neptuno

32 posts in 780 days


#11 posted 11-04-2014 09:47 AM

Alternating grain we all used to believe was a good practice, but Tage Frid has demolished the idea and firmly states that the practise does not do any good.

Pedro

-- We must all cross the line.

View kwolfe's profile

kwolfe

108 posts in 1027 days


#12 posted 11-04-2014 10:52 AM

Nice thing about pockets screws is that you wouldn’t have to keep a big piece like that clamped. Just glue, screw and go.

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