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Forum topic by MissouriOutdoors88 posted 10-27-2014 05:09 PM 1035 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MissouriOutdoors88

334 posts in 799 days


10-27-2014 05:09 PM

Does anyone work with cedar logs? I have a bunch that have been cut in the past few months along with some dry logs, and am struggling a little with them. I used a sharp knife to debark them which leaves some nicks. (I will be getting a drawknife this weekend.) Anyway, I used a belt sander with 80 grit and I’m not too happy with how some of them are turning out. I love the cream white that the cedar has to offer, but
I have sanded some a little too deep I think because it has exposed the layer underneath the white. I guess I just need to be more careful with peeling and not use such a heavy grit? It’s just hard to get that yellowish layer off that lies just beneath the bark. Any advice?

-- I'm an aspiring woodworker with a degree in Biology.


20 replies so far

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MissouriOutdoors88

334 posts in 799 days


#1 posted 10-27-2014 05:58 PM

I guess one of my questions is how deep do you sand your cedar logs and with what grit?

-- I'm an aspiring woodworker with a degree in Biology.

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firefighterontheside

13448 posts in 1317 days


#2 posted 10-28-2014 12:29 AM

I use a drawknife to remove most of the bark. I do not use a sander but this buffing brush. It removes remaining bark and cambium, but keeps the shape of the log. All of my railing parts are red cedar. The handrails I cut with the chainsaw guide attachment and then planed in my planer.

http://www.loghelp.com/p-1747-osborn-buffing-brushes.aspx

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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MissouriOutdoors88

334 posts in 799 days


#3 posted 10-28-2014 12:38 AM

Wow 80 bucks for one of those badboys!? Seems a bit steep. Can you post a pic of one of your logs when debarking and buffing is done, but before staining? Also, why is it that you don’t sand?

-- I'm an aspiring woodworker with a degree in Biology.

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firefighterontheside

13448 posts in 1317 days


#4 posted 10-28-2014 12:51 AM

Yeah, expensive but it’s lasted 13 years and going strong. When you use a draw knife, you get facets on the log that lend to the look I was going for. My house logs are the same way. A sander would take away the facets and it would not look authentic, IMO. My house logs are red pine from Minnesota that are hand peeled with a draw knife and fitted by hand with hand tools. The are as long as 43’ and are about 22” diameter at the butt end and about 10” at the other. I do not stain my cedar logs only water based poly on them.

My newel post.

Also newel

And this is a house log. You can see the facets that I did not want to sand off. The brush cleans the log of fuzz and splinters but does not change the shape.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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MissouriOutdoors88

334 posts in 799 days


#5 posted 10-28-2014 01:19 AM

May I ask what you mean by facets?

-- I'm an aspiring woodworker with a degree in Biology.

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firefighterontheside

13448 posts in 1317 days


#6 posted 10-28-2014 01:21 AM

Little flat spots from the draw knife cutting little wafers of wood off.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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MissouriOutdoors88

334 posts in 799 days


#7 posted 10-28-2014 01:29 AM

-- I'm an aspiring woodworker with a degree in Biology.

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firefighterontheside

13448 posts in 1317 days


#8 posted 10-28-2014 01:31 AM

Are those the legs for your table?

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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MissouriOutdoors88

334 posts in 799 days


#9 posted 10-28-2014 01:33 AM

Ok so above are some of my logs that I plan to use for legs for cedar tables. The bottom one has what is left after I skin the bark off. This yellowish brown layer is what I am asking about. I ended up sanding it all off down to the creamy white layer you see in the above pics. Then I end up going too deep in spots like in the second log from the bottom. I don’t know If I should be taking that layer off that’s in the bottom log.

-- I'm an aspiring woodworker with a degree in Biology.

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firefighterontheside

13448 posts in 1317 days


#10 posted 10-28-2014 01:39 AM

I call that layer the cambium between the bark and the sapwood. The buffer will take that off if you want. I wasn’t very particular on mine. I had so much to do at the time I was just happy the bark was off. I believe that white that you see will eventually turn yellow and it will all look similar.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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MissouriOutdoors88

334 posts in 799 days


#11 posted 10-28-2014 01:48 AM

That was my other question. I wonder if there’s any way to preserve that cream color. Also, how did you keep them from checking?

-- I'm an aspiring woodworker with a degree in Biology.

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firefighterontheside

13448 posts in 1317 days


#12 posted 10-28-2014 02:41 AM

Possibly if you put something on them with uv inhibitor it may not darken so much, but I doubt it. Most of them have checked and I did nothing to prevent it. The worst is only about 3/16 and even that does not go all the way. It just adds character in my opinion. My house logs don’t show any checking because they cut kerfs in the bottom of each log where they meet the log below. The deep kerf causes the log to check there and it is never seen. I have seen other similar log homes where they did not do that and there are checks in the logs that are over an inch wide.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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MissouriOutdoors88

334 posts in 799 days


#13 posted 10-28-2014 10:11 PM

-- I'm an aspiring woodworker with a degree in Biology.

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MissouriOutdoors88

334 posts in 799 days


#14 posted 10-28-2014 10:12 PM

So that yellowish brown layer you leave on?

-- I'm an aspiring woodworker with a degree in Biology.

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firefighterontheside

13448 posts in 1317 days


#15 posted 10-28-2014 10:23 PM

No I get most of it off. Some remains around the knots.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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