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DIY drum sander help

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Forum topic by diverlloyd posted 10-26-2014 09:44 PM 1643 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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diverlloyd

1431 posts in 1317 days


10-26-2014 09:44 PM

So I’m building a drum sander and its a 2” stainless steel drum 30” long. Has anyone used sticky backed Velcro on a metal drum. If so is the industrial Velcro better to use? I don’t want to glue the sand paper on so that is the reason for the Velcro and I have read that it reduces static and heat build up. Anyways any advice or experience would be greatly appreciated and thanks for reading and comments made.


17 replies so far

View crank49's profile

crank49

3980 posts in 2430 days


#1 posted 10-26-2014 10:10 PM

Sounds like a rather small drum. I would think it might be a problem to get the paper wound that small. Also, there would be more heat build-up with a small drum. And finally, I would worry about the small diameter causing something like snipe you get on a planer.
I will qualify this by saying I don’t own a drum sander, but have designed a fair amount of other equipment.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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diverlloyd

1431 posts in 1317 days


#2 posted 10-27-2014 02:39 AM

I have already wound sand paper around it to play around it and it was pretty simple. Most homemade drum sanders I see have a 5” diameter drum but are solid wood. That has a very small thermal conductivity so heat caused by sanding has no where to flow. Which I’m thinking is the reason for the larger drum. I factored this in when choosing the stainless tube as it will disperse heat through the metal and through the air space inside of the tube. The parts I’m using to hold shaft( mine is a pin in one end and the motor shaft in the other) are belt pulleys that I turned down to the I.D of the tube and a finned for heat dispersement and air flow through the drum. I thought of using copper for its high thermal conductivity but weight to strength stainless was a better choice. Although aluminium would be the best I think I don’t have a 2” or larger billet or heavy weight tube laying around in my garage. Oh and will be feeding it by hand so if I feed to fast I will get snipe or if it’s out of round it will snipe. If you could explain why a smaller diameter drum will snipe please do. I’m not understanding why a smaller diameter would do that if it stays straight and round across its length. Not trying to argue or disagree with you on it I just don’t understand how it would happen since a circle in contact with something only has a very minute point of contact debating on the amount of thickness you are taking out. I understand the heat build up since the circumference difference is substantial(12.566”). The difference in drum to work piece contact at taking a 1/16 of material off( which I think is a lot to take off at once) between a 2” and 5” in diameter drum is only a about a 1/4”. Please correct me if I am wrong in my thought process or my math is wrong. I’m just not seeing in the design or math what would cause snipe other then a drum not being or rotating out of round. Don’t take it as arguemenitive I just can’t see why the diameter would make a difference in the flatness of the material after it comes out of the machine giving that it stays true and straight. I have thought about the flex in the tube but it’s a heavy wall thickness tubeing so that shouldn’t be an issue.

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

19167 posts in 2134 days


#3 posted 10-27-2014 03:03 AM

I have the Grizzly GO458 18-36 open end drum sander.
I purchased it used off of CL and have only used it a short time.
So I could be way off base here….

All I can really do is offer info….

The drum is 4” and made of aluminum.
!!!The reviews mention burning (heat build up) is a common issue!!!
Seems to me that a 2” drum would allow for more heat build up….

Velcro upgrades (sold by Grizzly & others) are “glued” directly to the aluminum drum.
PSA Hook & Loop that adheres directly to a metal drum MUST be ok, as that is the standard.

I was going to build a drum sander, but scored a GREAT deal on CL….
My G0458 only cost me $200.00.

Good luck with your build….
BTW: Pictorial updates are REQUIRED!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

21978 posts in 1797 days


#4 posted 10-27-2014 03:14 AM

I think the heat build up would be determined by how much material you sand and how much pressure you put on the item being sanded. You usually do not put a lot of pressure down when sanding. The 2 main drum sanders I have been looking at have velcro to hold the paper on the tube. I don’t care for the stick on paper. My experience is that it’s unreliable. Hope my babble helps

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

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tomd

2026 posts in 3229 days


#5 posted 10-27-2014 03:36 AM

I built a drum sander and since I have bought a drum sander, I gave up on the homemade one because of the problems associated with hand feeding wood through it. My only observation would be no matter how you attach the sandpaper it will be passing over the wood faster and mainly far more often than a 5” drum and that may cause a lot more heat build up.

-- Tom D

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runswithscissors

2173 posts in 1484 days


#6 posted 10-27-2014 03:47 AM

I realize you are committed to what you have, but stainless steel has very poor heat conductance, which might be a problem. If you lived on the west coast, I’d suggest you buy a “clam gun,” the type that is an aluminum tube about 5” in diameter by a couple of feet long or so. You could cut that up and have your AL tubing. Aluminum conducts (and therefore dissipates) heat much better than stainless. Heat destroys sandpaper. Anyhow, I assume you’ll let us know how this works out.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

1431 posts in 1317 days


#7 posted 10-27-2014 11:00 AM

Thanks guys I will let you know how it turns out I will use it hooked directly to the motor and see how it goes. If heat build up is a problem I will hook it up to the motor via drive pulleys to lower the speed since the smaller diameter will be rotating faster then if it was a 5”. I will also test the Velcro vs no Velcro to depending on the final purchase price of the Velcro. Keep the comments coming the more brains the better.

View ChrisK's profile

ChrisK

1809 posts in 2541 days


#8 posted 10-27-2014 03:59 PM

I would look at the surface feet per minute required for the sandpaper to work at its best. Too fast it burns, to slow it fills up with wood bits. Stainless steel is a very poor conductor of heat. The air space in the tube would need to exchange with lots of cold air to be of any benefit.

-- Chris K

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diverlloyd

1431 posts in 1317 days


#9 posted 10-27-2014 05:01 PM

ok I know stainless isn’t as good of a conductor as aluminum or copper but is better then wood, I have already written that and written that the arbors are finned to pull air from one end of the tube to and out the other. By my math it should be doing a full change of the air 2 times a second. The benefit of the tube is its better and lighter then making the shaft out of wood. not as good as using aluminum and since copper would be even better then that.

The purpose of this isn’t about the shaft its about the Velcro and if it will stick well to the stainless drum or if it is beneficial at all. Will it help keep the sand paper cooler ec . This is a shop built machine made with extra things I have laying around the garage. The only money I would have invested will be for Velcro.

So we can keep going on with the poor conductivity which is 16 times better then wood but aluminum is 12 better then that and copper is 2 times better then even the aluminum. Or we can talk about the actual question about the Velcro.

Thanks for the responses and keep them coming oh I forgot to mention the motor is a 600 rpm motor. I have others but I chose this to compensate for the smaller drum size.

View ChrisK's profile

ChrisK

1809 posts in 2541 days


#10 posted 10-27-2014 05:58 PM

You may be running too low and rpm. Most of the machines out there have larger OD drums to increase the surface speed of the sander paper.

Your machine will run at 157.1 feet per minute. A machine with a 6” dia drum at 750 rpm runs at 1767.1 feet per minute.

http://www.woodmasterdrumsanders.com/2675 for example. I have done some design work for high rates of metal removal with grinding belts. They needed to be at 6000 SFPM.

As far as the sticky Velcro goes, the adhesive will will stick to metal. Clean the metal to get rid of any oils. It will insulate the paper from any potential ground allowed by the metal core, so no benefit for static. And the little air gaps in the Velcro should insulate the paper from the drum as well. So no real benefit for heat either. The above sander use Velcro on its drum. I can see the Velcro being a lot easier than gluing the paper each time.

-- Chris K

View GFactor's profile

GFactor

79 posts in 1059 days


#11 posted 10-27-2014 06:29 PM

I built a 30” Long 4” Drum unit from stockroomsupply.com recently and based on my set up, I would glue the Velcro to the drum. Heat will NOT be an issue, as the paper “lifts” off as the drum turns.

The height set up of the drum with the paper to the table is CRITICAL for success!!

I am using a 1/2HP 1725 RPM Grizzly Motor to power the unit (with pulleys and a belt) and it works great.

Stockroom Supply was great to deal with, they know their stuff, and were ALWAYS willing to help me out. I would contact them about the “Hook & Loop” (and to purchase it). They answer their phones, reply to emails quick and also have several videos on their site as reference.

-- To Steal Ideas From One Person is Plagiarism; to Steal From Many is Research…

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

1431 posts in 1317 days


#12 posted 10-27-2014 06:38 PM

Thanks guys I will up the motor to a 1800rpm

View retfr8flyr's profile

retfr8flyr

327 posts in 1128 days


#13 posted 10-27-2014 06:41 PM

I also have a Stock Room Supply V drum sander but I don’t think that is what the OP is building. Unless I am wrong he is building a conventional drum sander and heat buildup will be a problem. OP I think your best bet is to glue the velcro directly to the drum but as others have stated, I think your drum is too small to work well.

-- Earl

View GFactor's profile

GFactor

79 posts in 1059 days


#14 posted 10-27-2014 06:58 PM



I also have a Stock Room Supply V drum sander but I don t think that is what the OP is building. Unless I am wrong he is building a conventional drum sander and heat buildup will be a problem. OP I think your best bet is to glue the velcro directly to the drum but as others have stated, I think your drum is too small to work well.

- retfr8flyr


MY Bad…..

-- To Steal Ideas From One Person is Plagiarism; to Steal From Many is Research…

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

1431 posts in 1317 days


#15 posted 10-27-2014 09:29 PM

A flatness sander on top of drum and a thickness below. So it’s a hybrid of a stock room one and a traditional one. I hand plane almost everything so this is just a toy to play with. With next to no money involved.

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