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European equivalent to red oak?

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Forum topic by tooold posted 02-10-2009 10:33 AM 1156 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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tooold

56 posts in 3152 days


02-10-2009 10:33 AM

Topic tags/keywords: red oak europe equivalent

Hi -

Building up to my first project. I’m trying to find what the European (and French, in particular) equivalent to North American red oak might be – pretty much the standard issue, inexpensive hardwood? This is for some face frames that will be painted, so I’m not concerned about something that looks the same, just the functional equivalent.

Thanks!

Myles


11 replies so far

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SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3051 days


#1 posted 02-10-2009 11:37 AM

why not just buy european oak they have it here too you know.Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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tooold

56 posts in 3152 days


#2 posted 02-10-2009 11:43 AM

I’d be happy to – it’s just that there are about 200 different varieties! Trying to figure out what’s the most commonly used. If I had a good local lumberyard it would be easier (and if my French were better). I’m working on both…

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Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 3288 days


#3 posted 02-10-2009 12:09 PM

Myles, One suggestion I would have to offer is that oak does not take paint very well. Its open pores and heavy grain do not lend themselves to a smooth paint finish. If you are going to paint the frames you might want to consider poplar, which is easily machined, takes paint well and it is more economical than oak.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

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tooold

56 posts in 3152 days


#4 posted 02-10-2009 01:15 PM

Thanks, Scott, that’s very helpful. I’ll look into what I can get.

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Damian Penney

1141 posts in 3457 days


#5 posted 02-10-2009 09:40 PM

Poplar or ash.

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

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Al Killian

273 posts in 3219 days


#6 posted 02-10-2009 10:15 PM

You can get paint grade maple, which is better for painted surfaces. Plus it is dense and will not dent easy. I will see if I can find the names of lumber sold over there for you.

-- Owner of custom millwork shop

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SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3051 days


#7 posted 02-10-2009 11:49 PM

paint hardwood that’s a woodworking sin oooooh please don’t do it.LOL Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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doyoulikegumwood

384 posts in 3458 days


#8 posted 02-12-2009 10:14 AM

id be intrested in what these face frames are for you me be good with something cheap like mdo or hi presser mdf if you painting these

-- I buy tools so i can make more money,so ican buy more tools so I can work more, to make more money, so I can buy more tool, so I can work more

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tooold

56 posts in 3152 days


#9 posted 02-12-2009 10:38 AM

They’re for kitchen and bathroom cabinets. Any options would be great, only difficulty is figuring out what they’re called and where they’re sold in France. It’s much less DIY friendly here than in the US.

View Will Mego's profile

Will Mego

307 posts in 3178 days


#10 posted 02-12-2009 08:39 PM

Poplar, takes paint well, fairly cheap. Grows in France….Monet painted quite a few, I’ll add.

There’s a french poplar grower council,
FRANCE
Président, Commission Nationale du Peuplier
MAAPAR – DGFAR Bureau de l’orientation de la sylviculture
19, avenue du Maine
75732 Paris Cédex 15
Fax : +33 1 49 55 84 06
Tel : +33 1 49 55 51 26
E-mail: pierre.bouillon@agriculture.gouv.fr

from http://www.2020site.org/trees/poplar.html
Lombardy Poplar.
This fastigiate variety is probably a native of the mountains of Western or Northern Asia, perhaps of Persia. It has been common in that country, and in Kashmir and the Punjaub, from very early times, and is often planted along the roadsides in those distant lands, as it is in France, its somewhat scanty shade-producing powers being there of more importance than they are with us. Introduced from these countries into Southern Europe, the tree derives its popular names, both in France and in England, from its abundance along the banks of the Po and the other rivers of Lombardy, where at the present day it grows readily from self-sown seed, which it will not do in England. Considering that it was only introduced into France in 1749, and into England in 1758, it is interesting to note that William Turner, writing two hundred years before, in his “Names of Herbes” (1548), says of the genus:—

“Populus is of two kyndes, the fyrste kynde is called in greeke Leuce, in Latin Populus alba, in englishe whyte Poplar, or whyte Esptree, in duch wisz sarbach. Thys kynde is commune about the bankes of the floude Padus [the Po]. The seconde kynde is called in Greeke Argeiros, in englishe alone a popler, or an Asp tree, or a blacke popler.”
————————————————————
from http://www.genoscope.cns.fr/spip/Populus-trichocarpa-Poplar.html
In France, poplars are the second most important deciduous species for the production of logs.
—————————————————-
and finally, a list of wood biz in france:
http://www.fordaq.com/fordaq/Member_Directory_By_country/France_87.html

-- "That which has in itself the greatest use, possesses the greatest beauty." - http://www.willmego.com/

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tooold

56 posts in 3152 days


#11 posted 02-12-2009 10:12 PM

Will, that’s really helpful, thanks!

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