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What to do with a sink cutout?

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Forum topic by MT_Stringer posted 10-22-2014 11:37 PM 1584 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MT_Stringer

2853 posts in 2695 days


10-22-2014 11:37 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

The counter top for our kitchen will be installed in a few weeks. I asked the template guy if he was going to cut the sink opening on site or at their shop. He said on site. I said I wanted the cutout. After all, I paid for it, right?

OK, so what am I going to do with a piece of 3/4 inch thick quartz (Silestone)? The sink is 33 inches wide x about 20 inches deep. I might give the installer a tip to clean it up for me.

I have a router table so I don’t need to make another one. All I can think of at the moment is a patio cart. I have a nice gas grill that the cart could sit next to. In my younger days, I would make a fish cleaning station :-) .

Have y’all got any ideas? Throw them out there. I would appreciate it.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas


27 replies so far

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3022 posts in 1262 days


#1 posted 10-22-2014 11:50 PM

Can you mill it with woodworking tools like Corian? If so, plane it down and make ZCIs. Use it with abrasive for flattening hand planes.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2325 posts in 1761 days


#2 posted 10-23-2014 12:32 AM

Dead flat surface for scary sharp method of sharpening. Or what you already thought – another small table surface.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2853 posts in 2695 days


#3 posted 10-23-2014 12:33 AM



Can you mill it with woodworking tools like Corian? If so, plane it down and make ZCIs. Use it with abrasive for flattening hand planes.

- CharlesA

I don’t know. I will have to check. Thanks

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View DKV's profile

DKV

3940 posts in 1968 days


#4 posted 10-23-2014 12:38 AM

Sharpening and small glue ups. Easy glue cleanup.

-- This is a Troll Free zone.

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Ger21

1047 posts in 2595 days


#5 posted 10-23-2014 01:11 AM

No, it’s not like corian. It requires the normal tools used for working with stone tops.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

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CharlesA

3022 posts in 1262 days


#6 posted 10-23-2014 01:11 AM



No, it s not like corian. It requires the normal tools used for working with stone tops.

- Ger21

bummer.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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timbertailor

1592 posts in 888 days


#7 posted 10-23-2014 01:12 AM

They made the extra Italian Quartz (Silestone) in our house into a cutting board.
Also doubles as a hot plate. Will not crack like granite when subjected to extreme heat. And since it is basically glass, will not absorb carbonates, or anything else. Very sterile, once cleaned. Its lack or porosity is the key.
Quartz does not leave seams or need to be sealed\maintained. Good stuff and that is why it is three times more expensive than granite. Great product choice Mike.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

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MT_Stringer

2853 posts in 2695 days


#8 posted 10-23-2014 01:35 AM



They made the extra Italian Quartz (Silestone) in our house into a cutting board.
Also doubles as a hot plate. Will not crack like granite when subjected to extreme heat. And since it is basically glass, will not absorb carbonates, or anything else. Very sterile, once cleaned. Its lack or porosity is the key.
Quartz does not leave seams or need to be sealedmaintained. Good stuff and that is why it is three times more expensive than granite. Great product choice Mike.

- timbertailor

Thanks. That is why it was chosen. We used it for our buffet. I like it.
A cutting board sounds like a good idea. A hot plate also.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View Crank50's profile

Crank50

173 posts in 1040 days


#9 posted 10-23-2014 02:33 AM

Maybe I’m wrong, but my understanding of Stilestone is that it’s quartz particles bonded together with resin. Therefore, it can be damaged by high heat before granite can. That is basically the recommendation of a Consumer’s Report evaluation and confirmed by my countertop installer. He was as baffled as I was why people pay way more for quartz. He also pointed out that it did not need sealing because it is manufactured from essentially quartz powder and plastic. It is sealed by the nature of its construction. He does like to sell it because it’s a higher profit product and not as easy as granite to break accidentally.

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MT_Stringer

2853 posts in 2695 days


#10 posted 10-23-2014 02:42 AM

Thanks Crank. We already have the Silestone on our buffet. So we stuck with it. My wife likes the idea of no sealing/lo maintenance.

Our buffet

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View Ger21's profile

Ger21

1047 posts in 2595 days


#11 posted 10-23-2014 02:51 AM

Not sure why anyone would want to use a stone cutting board, if they wanted any chance of keeping their knives sharp?

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2853 posts in 2695 days


#12 posted 10-23-2014 02:53 AM



Not sure why anyone would want to use a stone cutting board, if they wanted any chance of keeping their knives sharp?

- Ger21

All ideas welcome. Got any?

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1113 posts in 2408 days


#13 posted 10-23-2014 03:24 AM

If you have a circular saw, you can cut the cutout so it’s square, has corners knocked off or whatever you want. Just pick up a cheap diamond blade and, when you use it, dribble a little water on the cut for cooling. I’ve cut a lot of granite this way.

If you have an angle grinder, you can buy a Harbor Freight diamond blade for it, run painters tape where you’d like to mark it for cutting, say for a circle, then the grinder to cut your lines. By just running around the piece, you can cut shapes limited only by the radius allowed by the cut of a four or five inch wheel.

I buy only variable speed grinders because they allow me to work granite without burning up expensive pads and bits used for these processes. Polishing, for example, requires slower speeds. You can buy a set of pads and, again, with water to keep them cool, you can polish the edges.

Granite supply places (e.g., Master Wholesale, out of Seattle) sell grinding stones you can use to round over the edges (I bit the bullet and bought the router bit for the grinder). They only run about ten bucks and hog a lot of granite off.

Attached is an old planter stand the ex’s grandpa repaired using chipboard. To say it looked like hell was an understatement, but that’s why they invented dollies, eh? Anyway, it just seemed fun to take a cheap pieces of furniture and high end it, so I cut and polished this top, as described.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2853 posts in 2695 days


#14 posted 10-23-2014 03:29 AM



If you have a circular saw, you can cut the cutout so it s square, has corners knocked off or whatever you want. Just pick up a cheap diamond blade and, when you use it, dribble a little water on the cut for cooling. I ve cut a lot of granite this way.

Another thing you can do is, run painters tape where you d like to mark it for cutting, say for a circle, then use a angle grinder. By just running around the piece, you can cut shapes limited only by the radius allowed by the cut of a four or five inch wheel.

I buy only variable speed grinders because they allow me to work granite. Polishing, for example, requires slower speeds. You can buy a set of pads and, again, with water to keep them cool, you can polish the edges.

Granite supply places (e.g., Master Wholesale, out of Seattle) sell grinding stones you can use to round over the edges (I bit the bullet and bought the router bit for the grinder). They only run about ten bucks and hog a lot of granite off.

Attached is an old planter stand the ex s grandpa repaired using chipboard. To say it looked like hell was an understatement, but that s why they invented dollies, eh? Anyway, it just seemed fun to take a cheap pieces of furniture and high end it, so I cut and polished this top, as described.

- Kelly

Good info. Thanks.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View watermark's profile

watermark

482 posts in 1407 days


#15 posted 10-23-2014 09:00 AM

A lot of good ideas already. Here is something I made with granite left overs.

-- "He who has no dog, hunts with a cat" Portuguese proverb

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