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Moving fence to the right/re-designing crosscut sled

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Forum topic by CharlesA posted 10-22-2014 04:25 PM 1124 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CharlesA

3019 posts in 1258 days


10-22-2014 04:25 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question crosscut fence sled

i am considering moving my fence to the right a la MT_Stringer and Knotscott. This creates a problem for my crosscut sled which extends to the left. I don’t have room to allow for the rails to extend further right and my crosscut sled to extend far to the left. The capacity to handle long boards with a precise stop block is one of the best features of my sled.

So, i have two questions:
1) is the simple solution to build a new sled oriented to the right instead of the left!
2) I have a nice sled. But since I may build a new one, what features of your sled do you really like? I like my precision stop block on t-track and the removable extension that increases capacity.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson


14 replies so far

View timbertailor's profile

timbertailor

1591 posts in 885 days


#1 posted 10-22-2014 05:22 PM

I have a simple sled. I do not use it much except for large panels that need cross cutting. My sled sits on the right so that my EB3 miter gauge can sit on the left. I made it just short of the fence so I do not have to remove the fence entirely.

I find sleds take up a lot of space when not in use and the more “features”, the heavier\larger they seem to get.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

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Dallas

3599 posts in 1948 days


#2 posted 10-22-2014 05:40 PM

CharlesA, Isn’t your fence already on the right side of the saw blade?

My Craftsman, a lot like the one in your workshop photo, except mine had the steel wings, had a set of rails on both sides. They didn’t look original, but then I was the third or forth owner.

Just another observation, shouldn’t your sled use the miter gauge slots instead of the fence to guide with? I don’t know, I got rid of the Craftsman after about 6 hours of setup and 1 hour of use.

My Ryobi BT3100 has miter gauge slots as well as a sliding miter table. It will allow me to cut a 3’ board easily.
My fence lives on the right side and the gauges live on the left. I can buy an extra set of rails to extend as far as I want, and I think you can with that saw also.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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MT_Stringer

2851 posts in 2691 days


#3 posted 10-22-2014 06:07 PM

If you build a new one, you might want to consider the adjustable sled. That allows you to use a dado blade with it. :-)
Only one runner is used because the right side is the part that is adjustable.

Note: There have been times when I have had to clamp a stop block onto my fence when cutting longer boards.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/95377

Cutting dados in drawer sides for dividers. :-)

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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CharlesA

3019 posts in 1258 days


#4 posted 10-22-2014 09:03 PM

Dallas, I must not have been clear.

My table saws footprint is at max for my shop. My sled is from the same plan that vrice used in this project.

This is great because it extends far to the left and allows me to make precise crosscuts, let’s say 48 3/16”. But in order to make room for this sled, I need to have clear room to the left.

If I decide to move the rails of my fence one bolt opening to the right (see link in OP), to give it greater rip capacity, I need to subtract space from the left (just the reality of my shop). So, I was thinking of making a mirror image of my sled on the right. However, now that I think of it, I would have to take the fence off every time I use it (hence why most sleds extend to the left).

Hmmm . . . I may need to back off moving the fence rails.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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Dallas

3599 posts in 1948 days


#5 posted 10-22-2014 09:28 PM

OK, I’ll give up and agree. It just seems to me that you said you wanted to move your fence to the right. That would mean the blade is to the left, except the picture you show has the fence on the left, unless we are looking at the back of the saw.

One you have ‘x’ amount of sled space to left or right of the blade, clamp it down at any length. It won’t move and will stay square.

Someone please educate me in this?

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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DKV

3940 posts in 1965 days


#6 posted 10-22-2014 09:35 PM

I’m waiting for knowledge because like Dallas I must have misread the OP and after rereading it I am still misreading it? Does that make sense? Maybe my mom tattooed the L and R on the wrong hands when I was but a child.

-- This is a Troll Free zone.

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CharlesA

3019 posts in 1258 days


#7 posted 10-22-2014 09:36 PM

dallas, both pics in this thread showing the sled on the saw were taken from the back.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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CharlesA

3019 posts in 1258 days


#8 posted 10-22-2014 09:41 PM

Okay, here is a pic that shows a sled similar to mine

And here is one very similar to mine that extends to the right instead of the left

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2851 posts in 2691 days


#9 posted 10-22-2014 11:18 PM

Charles, the way I see it, it won’t affect your sled at all. In fact, the sled I have was modified from it’s original version. There isn’t any difference in the way it works, except that it is adjustable.

Take just your fence off and move it outward 10 inches and take another look and see if that is correct. I went from 26 to 37 inches of rip capacity. I guess if I was so inclined, I could make a new sled that would in effect, move the sled base over some, but I am still only using the single miter slot on the left side of the blade to guide the sled.

Good luck. Post some pics when you get your fence relocated.
Mike

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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CharlesA

3019 posts in 1258 days


#10 posted 10-22-2014 11:22 PM

Mike,

You’re right—moving the fence won’t affect the use of the sled at all. It just affects the space I have. In other words, if the rails stick out 12 more inches the the right, I won’t have room to get around it when I walk into the shop, so I need to move the saw left 12”. That means I don’t have room for my crosscut sled to the left.

There would be no problem at all if I had more lateral space for my saw.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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MT_Stringer

2851 posts in 2691 days


#11 posted 10-22-2014 11:23 PM



Mike,

You re right—moving the fence won t affect the use of the sled at all. It just affects the space I have. In other words, if the rails stick out 12 more inches the the right, I won t have room to get around it when I walk into the shop, so I need to move the saw left 12”. That means I don t have room for my crosscut sled to the left.

There would be no problem at all if I had more lateral space for my saw.

- CharlesA

I got cha. I have the very same problem – space limited.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3599 posts in 1948 days


#12 posted 10-23-2014 12:13 AM

OK, I think I got it, LOL.
I’m still unclear as to why the sled needs to be wider than it is. If it is four square to the blade and you put a piece of wood against it, the wood will be 90° to the blade no matter how long the sled or wood is.
Granted, the longer it is the more unbalanced it would be and you would need a more secure hold down, but that isn’t an insurmountable obstacle.
For limited space you can’t use lumber that is very long anyway.

I swear, I’m not trying to be obtuse, it’s just stuff that runs through my tiny mind.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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CharlesA

3019 posts in 1258 days


#13 posted 10-23-2014 12:21 AM

No worries, Dallas. The reason the sled is so wide is that it has an integrated measuring system with a stop block in t-track. For me, this means that if I need to crosscut 4 pieces 43 3/16”, I can set the block to that measurement, and I get four identical length boards. I find this incredibly handy. If I am crosscutting something that doesn’t have to be precise or repeatable (unless 18” or under), I use my miter saw.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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DKV

3940 posts in 1965 days


#14 posted 10-23-2014 12:35 AM

I got it, I got it, I got it! The sled fence, not the table saw fence, the sled fence said the blind man as he picked up his hammer and saw…

-- This is a Troll Free zone.

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