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End-grain chamfer on Cherry Tabletop - Table Saw or Router Table ????????

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Forum topic by C_PLUS_Woodworker posted 10-21-2014 07:20 PM 2679 views 1 time favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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C_PLUS_Woodworker

601 posts in 2372 days


10-21-2014 07:20 PM

I am ready to put an edge on a 19” x 50” table top.

Top is very close to 1” thick.

I have nice, straight, smooth ends on the table top, so it is ready for the “edging process”.

Would like to put a heavy chamfer on the BOTTOM of the table top…......probably go 75% of the thickness of the table with no chamfer on the top 25-30% of table top bottom.

Looking to “lighten” the look of the table.

I have enough good and sharp TS blades to cut nicely so getting a 45 degree chamfer would be easy…..... if I am careful with the depth of the cut

I also have a nice, new, high-end 4 blade 3/4”chamfer (with bearing) router bit I can use in my router table.

In fact, I bought that router bit for this cut, but have been worried about tear-out since day one.

I would certainly cut just a little off every pass if I used the router table…...... and would probably sneak up on the cut if I used the TS

I would really like a little guidance as to which way to go….....how to do it…. and why.

As always,...........thanks in advance

Bruce


19 replies so far

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Karson

35035 posts in 3865 days


#1 posted 10-21-2014 07:25 PM

If you can get a nice high fence on your table saw so you can slide the table top easily on edge across the blade, I’d go with it that way.

My table saw fence has the ability to use a t-slot attachment to a piece of plywood or mdf. I’d attach something like that and then slide the toy along it on edge.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

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C_PLUS_Woodworker

601 posts in 2372 days


#2 posted 10-21-2014 07:28 PM

Hey Karson, appreciate you always chiming in.

I was thinking I could just tilt the TS blade to 45 and run the board flat through the blade…......... NO????

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Karson

35035 posts in 3865 days


#3 posted 10-21-2014 07:48 PM

On my Shaker table, I had a 1” top and I cut it so that the top had a 1/2” visible and 1/2’ cut off. The cut was about 1 1/2 long. i think a 45 deg angle is too steep. You want the angle cut to be invisible to the eye when you are looking at the table.

Some magazine articles I just looked at recommend a 6 to 7 degree angle. Both of the articles recommend that just 1/2” be visible.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

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C_PLUS_Woodworker

601 posts in 2372 days


#4 posted 10-21-2014 08:11 PM

Wow, wonderful response. Looked (again) at your projects. Jeez, you make nice stuff.

This is my first shot at a table top chamfer and I obviously knew/know nothing about what I am doing, hence this forum topic.

I usually read up on stuff, but I just assumed the chamfer was 45.

What you said and quoted makes perfect sense, so thanks for the time you spent helping me.

So, if I understand you correctly I should only put a 6-7 degree chamfer on the bottom of the table top and (since it is REAL close to 1” thick) to chamfer about half leaving a 1/2” um-chamfered visible edge. Is that correct?

And, is there reasons why I cannot adjust my blade to 7 degrees (from 90 degrees) and run the board flat through the saw? I am VERY confused about this. I read all the time about running wide boards on edge through the TS with a high fence and never understood why. Even the plans for the table says this:

Typically, I like to use a table
saw to cut a bevel on a workpiece.
But trying to bevel the
bottom side of the sofa table top
created a problem. It just wasn’t
safe to stand this large panel on
end and use the table saw.

So, can you help me with why I cannot just take 6-7 degrees off my vertical TS blade and run the board through the saw?

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C_PLUS_Woodworker

601 posts in 2372 days


#5 posted 10-21-2014 08:12 PM

Duplicate Post

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Karson

35035 posts in 3865 days


#6 posted 10-21-2014 09:14 PM

You can only set the blade to 45 degree you can’t get it to 6-7 deg.

So what you do is put the board on edge and cut it at around 83 deg. Just a slight adjustment from the 90 degree it is normally set at.

Send me your email address in a message and I’ll send you an article that shows it.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6572 posts in 1615 days


#7 posted 10-21-2014 09:58 PM

I’m not so sure I’d want to run a 50” tall tabletop on edge through the tablesaw.

What I would do is to make an external fence and sub-base for your router, with the subbase set at the desired 7-8 degree angle. Use your straight bit and go slow. If you use a tall fence underneath the base, you shouldn’t have any problems with the router tipping.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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C_PLUS_Woodworker

601 posts in 2372 days


#8 posted 10-21-2014 10:02 PM

Man, I am really hung up on this.

I just do not understand why I cannot just set my blade at 83 degrees and run the board through flat ???

Wouldn’t that give me a 7 degree chamfer?

I must be slow slow slow

I am going out into the shop right now and run a scrap piece through at 83 degrees.

Thanks guys

View Greg In Maryland's profile

Greg In Maryland

550 posts in 2463 days


#9 posted 10-21-2014 10:36 PM

Perhaps hand planes and a marking gauge are the solution?

Greg

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7174 posts in 2042 days


#10 posted 10-21-2014 10:59 PM

I second Greg’s idea. Get a plane with a fence and add

an angled block to it and bevel away.

Mine’s a block plane with a fence and a piece of maple.

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jmartel

6572 posts in 1615 days


#11 posted 10-21-2014 11:21 PM



Man, I am really hung up on this.

I just do not understand why I cannot just set my blade at 83 degrees and run the board through flat ???

Wouldn t that give me a 7 degree chamfer?

I must be slow slow slow

I am going out into the shop right now and run a scrap piece through at 83 degrees.

Thanks guys

- CPLUSWoodworker

We are talking about different 7 degrees. What you are referencing the 7 degrees is off the vertical (end grain) face. What Karson is talking about is referencing it off of the bottom face. So, it is a very long taper that reaches under the table.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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retfr8flyr

327 posts in 1134 days


#12 posted 10-21-2014 11:23 PM

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jmartel

6572 posts in 1615 days


#13 posted 10-21-2014 11:27 PM

Thank you, Earl. That was what I was trying to describe in my first post.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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Karson

35035 posts in 3865 days


#14 posted 10-21-2014 11:44 PM

yes the angle is anywhere fron 6 to 15 deg depending how far you want the bevel to go under the edge.

I’m not sure what the angle is here because this is a deep 1” top. the visible edge is 1/2” and it goes back about 1 13/8”

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

14594 posts in 2148 days


#15 posted 10-22-2014 12:01 AM

Nothing real fancy to this one

Just mark how much of a bevel you want

Hand plane at a diagonal to the end grain until the bevel is done on the end grain, rotate

and do the long grain sides. Table top bottom edges…or raised panels, all the same. I used a Stanley 5-1/4 Junior Jack plane. Clean up with a low angle block plane.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

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