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Designing variable redwood louvers to shade a patio

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Forum topic by Ruby posted 02-09-2009 10:30 PM 7011 views 1 time favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ruby

3 posts in 2853 days


02-09-2009 10:30 PM

Topic tags/keywords: louvers redwood overhead shading question

We are planning to put a “pergola type” roof made out of redwood over an existing patio/porch attached to the rear of our house. We would like to be able to vary the shading by adjusting the top-most cross members in an adjustable louver-like fashion. Has anyone ever done something like this or seen it done? The patio faces the west and gets quite warm but we do not want to darken the adjacent rooms with a permenant complete cover.
We appreciate any and all info. Thanks.
Ruby


10 replies so far

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Ruby

3 posts in 2853 days


#1 posted 02-10-2009 12:59 AM

Thanks for your reply, DaveR. I appreciate your concern and suggestions regarding the longevity of the pivot/hinge assemblies. The location is Southern California and so lots of sun expected and excessive warping is a concern. I was visualizing the slats to be 3 to 4 feet long and made from 1×6 redwood fencing. The pivots would be placed either on the underside or on top of 12-foot long beams perpendicular to the rear wall of the house with a 3 to 4 foot spacing between beams.

All comments and suggestions would be appreciated.

Ruby

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GFYS

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#2 posted 02-10-2009 08:05 AM

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LesB

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#3 posted 02-10-2009 09:10 AM

I made one of these many years ago. Quite similar to the design above. I used 3/4” aluminum “U” shaped channel 4” long to cap each end of the louvre boards. Then i drilled the pivot holes through the channel into the board ends of the boards at the center and used a 1/4” X 6” solid aluminum rod for the pivot pins. The channel prevented the pivot pins from splitting out of the soft 3/4” redwood and also reduced any twisting of the boards.. I sealed the wood with linseed oil (thinned with turpentine) and recoated it every couple of years. My boards were 6’ long and I did get some warping so I would suggest staying under 4 feet and use straight grain or “quarter saw” wood. Flat sawn boards will warp for sure. By routinely alternating the exposure on the boards I could prevent to much warp but I did have to replace a few boards over time. It had a South West exposure so it let in the winter sun and kept out the hot summer sun. That was in central California near San Jose.

-- Les B, Oregon

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Sawdust2

1467 posts in 3547 days


#4 posted 02-10-2009 12:58 PM

Wow! What a thought!
I am marking this as a favorite as I will be putting up a pergola this spring.

Lee

-- No piece is cut too short. It was meant for a smaller project.

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GFYS

711 posts in 2930 days


#5 posted 02-10-2009 06:17 PM

My drawing is conceptual and I can see ways to improve it. Feel free.

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LesB

1235 posts in 2902 days


#6 posted 02-10-2009 08:11 PM

With some more thought on this. I wonder how the “plastic” manufactured deck boards would work instead of redwood? It should eliminate the warping and the need for regular sealing. If you go with redwood I would use some of the current deck sealers instead of the linseed oil I originally used….that was way back in 1972.
Also in the drawing above. You could just use longer U channel instead of the raised wood end on the boards for the tilting mechanism.

-- Les B, Oregon

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GFYS

711 posts in 2930 days


#7 posted 02-10-2009 10:37 PM

The plastic composite deck boards are more flexible that regular wood..by far. The stuff is like wet noodles.

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Craftsman on the lake

2520 posts in 2897 days


#8 posted 02-10-2009 11:05 PM

I recently built a pergola for my sister. She wanted it covered. I picked up some polycarbonate from home depot. It’s like the plastic corrugated plastic stuff but thin and extremely (lifetime) tough. It’s also smoked so that light goes through but it works great for sun and of course keeps out rain.

http://web.me.com/deceiver6/Deceiver/At_Velmas.html#1

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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Helen

1 post in 2840 days


#9 posted 02-22-2009 05:55 AM

Hi: Home Mechanix July 1988 page 43 had plans for an adjustable louvered deck roof. The photos are great. I of course, “just threw out” page 43 If anyone has it, I’d like a copy myself. Thanks. spider1222@hotmail.com

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Ruby

3 posts in 2853 days


#10 posted 02-25-2009 03:57 AM

Thanks to all for a lot of good suggestions. Gives me plenty to ponder and decide.

Ruby

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