LumberJocks

UPDATED!: What type of 2 part epoxy for inside mugs or tankards.

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by Micah Muzny posted 10-17-2014 04:11 PM 3414 views 2 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Micah Muzny's profile

Micah Muzny

185 posts in 1192 days


10-17-2014 04:11 PM

I was looking into making the wood mugs or tankards like you see and renaissance festivals and such. Online I see people saying they use two part epoxy for the inside. I cannot however find what brand or what type. What epoxies are safe and which are not? Where can I buy the kind I need?


15 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

8295 posts in 3108 days


#1 posted 10-17-2014 04:33 PM

I researched this as best I could many years ago and
made 1 or 2 leather tankards. I think I actually used
black polyurethane. It did taste a little plasticky but
handled hot liquids just fine. My research indicated
it to be reasonably food safe when cured and as I
recall this is what people selling them were using,
imitating the look of a pitch lining I suppose.

Perhaps the epoxies don’t impart a plasticky taste,
which is subtle but it’s one reason coffee and bear
taste best out of glass or paper cups.

If I were you I would consider building my mugs
around a common glass or ceramic tumbler as
a liner.

View Micah Muzny's profile

Micah Muzny

185 posts in 1192 days


#2 posted 10-17-2014 05:57 PM

I would like to make it out of wood only, not inserts.

View ChrisK's profile

ChrisK

1809 posts in 2541 days


#3 posted 10-17-2014 06:11 PM

http://www.masterbond.com/tds/ep42ht-2fg

Poke around master bonds sight. I am sure you can email their tech staff for an answer.

-- Chris K

View Micah Muzny's profile

Micah Muzny

185 posts in 1192 days


#4 posted 10-18-2014 01:20 AM

I email the company Envirotex about there epoxy since I see many people using it online for mugs and such and they say it is not safe for this use. Only for casual food contact such as table and bar tops.

This is the reply:

Hello Micah,
EnviroTex Lite is considered safe for casual food contact, so bar tops, counter tops and table tops. It is not suitable for the inside of coffee mugs, on plates, or bowls.

Best Regards,

Marty Sanchez
Technician/Customer Service

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

2657 posts in 2644 days


#5 posted 10-18-2014 04:43 AM

I looked into this once and learned that Waterlox is food safe when cured, and water and heat resistant. The downside is the curing takes a long time… it can take weeks for the solvents to fully evaporate out. I’m also not sure how well it holds up to alcohol, I’ll have to try this someday.

-- Allen, Colorado

View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

4530 posts in 1972 days


#6 posted 10-18-2014 12:56 PM

I’ve made mugs just as you’re talking about and have done extensive research but wasn’t able to find any FDA approved epoxy, I’ve also heard that no matter what finish you use be it Shellac, Lacquer, Poly to epoxy any finish… on any surface once it’s dried and cured there’s no leaching but nothing has been tested or proven, it’s all hear say, I’ve read the articles from those that make mugs and how to finish them with their methods but still nothing proven, I stopped making the mugs just for this reason as the $50.00 I was making per mug along with the worry of liability issues and reasons just wasn’t worth it for me, now saying that the epoxy I have used is this.

http://www.amazon.com/Bob-Smith-206-Slow-Cure-Epoxy/dp/B001NI8MNK/ref=sr_1_2/188-8309008-8255302?ie=UTF8&qid=1413636763&sr=8-2&keywords=bob+smith+epoxy

I believe the safest way to do it is to purchase the stainless inserts and make the mug so it can hold the insert.

Monte here on LJ’s makes mugs might send him a message.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View TravisH's profile

TravisH

452 posts in 1395 days


#7 posted 10-18-2014 04:14 PM

I have used shellac in the past and also just left them natural to stain, absorb, crack, etc… Sort of the like the coconut shell bowls I made for the kids years ago. They got about 4 to 5 years use out of them before they would no longer hold milk.

View Micah Muzny's profile

Micah Muzny

185 posts in 1192 days


#8 posted 10-19-2014 05:58 PM

I have found this list of FDA approved epoxies. I don’t not know how to tell much about each epoxy listed though. Here is the link if anyone wants to look at it and give some feedback about it. http://www.alfaadhesives.com/v2/productlist.php?series=FDA-Grade-Adhesives

View Micah Muzny's profile

Micah Muzny

185 posts in 1192 days


#9 posted 10-20-2014 01:42 AM

I assume any on that list would be ok for food/drink contact. I just wonder which will hold up to the drinks and alcohol etc. Doesn’t say the color either, I seen some epoxies that are amber in color but I would need clear.

View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

4530 posts in 1972 days


#10 posted 10-20-2014 03:45 PM

Even still FDA doesn’t necessary mean it’s safe for holding things for consuming, I’d call them first before I purchased it and let them know what it’s intended for.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1829 days


#11 posted 10-21-2014 12:25 PM

Micahm, if you haven’t already, I suggest thoroughly reading the referenced FDA CFRs. It’s not as clear-cut as them saying “Use this epoxy on whatever you’re making and put whatever in the cup.” There are guidelines for what applications a certain product may be used for (some state that they are safe for food contact during consumption, some state that the contact is limited only to a seam in the packaging material). Also, there are guidelines as far as how the epoxy is applied, temperature constraints, and what chemicals the epoxy/sealant is approved for contact with after it is cured.

P.S. You can attach a disclaimer to your mug, but in the end, you have no control over what people put in it. Whether you’re liability is covered or not, if you’re selling a wooden stein with a disclaimer that it is not suitable for holding alcohol, people are going to put alcohol in it.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View ScubaSteve's profile

ScubaSteve

5 posts in 1203 days


#12 posted 10-21-2014 06:17 PM

Winemakers use some combination of bee’s wax and paraffin wax to seal the interior of their wooden tanks, in Europe many are over 100 years old.

View Micah Muzny's profile

Micah Muzny

185 posts in 1192 days


#13 posted 10-23-2014 09:09 PM

UPDATE!:

I emailed a guy on Etsy that makes wooden mugs and he actually told me what he uses! Only maker to actually do that out of the ones I messaged. He uses Brewcoat by Sound Specialty Coatings. It is FDA rated and made for winery tank linings and water tank linings. It cures in 7 days approximately. Forms a hard surface, corrosion resistant and solvent free. AND GET THIS: on the manufacturers website it shows projects one being wooden wine bottles! The only downside is it is $210 dollars for 2 gallons, which would last a while and if you are making a lot of items to sell wouldn’t be too bad I guess. Says storage for 24 months but don’t see why if you had it a little longer it would hurt.

View Micah Muzny's profile

Micah Muzny

185 posts in 1192 days


#14 posted 10-23-2014 09:13 PM

He also uses the CA glue from highland woodworking for the exterior finish

View Micah Muzny's profile

Micah Muzny

185 posts in 1192 days


#15 posted 10-23-2014 10:24 PM

Also found some called Max CLR I may look more into.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com