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DINING TABLE TOP FINISH

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Forum topic by JUC posted 10-17-2014 02:01 PM 1120 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JUC

116 posts in 1356 days


10-17-2014 02:01 PM

I am new to woodworking and about to make a live edge dining table. What is a good finish for this purpose? Lacquer, polyurethane, oil or I have seen some positive comments on OSMO finishing products.
Any help would be wonderful!!
Jeffrey

-- If no one will ever see it, all the more reason to make it right


8 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4456 posts in 3426 days


#1 posted 10-17-2014 03:35 PM

Depends on what finishing equipment you have.
I would use a wiping poly if you don’t have spray capabilities.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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FlyFisher70

12 posts in 784 days


#2 posted 10-17-2014 03:42 PM

I am also finishing a live edge table and have been trying to select a finish. I have read a lot of articles and I think I am going to end up going with either the Waterlox Original tung oil or the General Finishes Arm-R-Seal. Here is a thread on Lumber Jocks about the Waterlox:

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/51913

Supposedly, Waterlox protects very well against water/heat if applied correctly. It is also easily repaired, which will be a nice benefit on a kitchen table.

-- Woodworking; there is no app for that.

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JUC

116 posts in 1356 days


#3 posted 10-17-2014 05:25 PM

Thanks for the help. I am now confused. I went on the woodcraft site and found / waterlox original gloss, satin marine and sealer. Which original do I use first before I use the satin? If I do not use the satin will I have a glossier finish?
Jeffrey

-- If no one will ever see it, all the more reason to make it right

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jmartel

6574 posts in 1615 days


#4 posted 10-17-2014 05:28 PM

Use an oil based varnish. Waterlox, Poly, Arm-R-Seal, etc. Lacquer and Oil won’t stand up to the use as well.

As far as sheen goes, a good rule of thumb that I’ve found is to do all but the last coat in gloss. Then make your last coat whatever sheen you want (satin, semi-gloss, matte, etc). You will end up with a clearer finish that shows the wood better.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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FlyFisher70

12 posts in 784 days


#5 posted 10-17-2014 05:31 PM

I don’t have experience yet, but the majority of people that I have spoken with say to use the original (medium sheen). If you want a satin finish, Waterlox says to apply 3-4 coats of the medium sheen and then finish it with 1 coat of satin. Supposedly if you use satin as all the coats, you will end up with a cloudy finish.

If you use the medium sheen all the way, it is supposed to have a gloss when you are done, but that gloss will fade over the next 6-9 months. You are supposed to be able to buff it out to your liking.

Charlie on LJ recommended using a lamb’s wool applicator, putting down three heavy coats with it, then rubbing 2-3 more coats on with a lint-free rag. Hopefully I will be able to start the finish on my table this weekend to see how things go with the Waterlox.

-- Woodworking; there is no app for that.

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FlyFisher70

12 posts in 784 days


#6 posted 10-17-2014 05:33 PM

jmartel, do you have any expeirence with Behlen’s Rock Hard Varnish? That is another one I have heard works well.

-- Woodworking; there is no app for that.

View Charlie's profile

Charlie

1100 posts in 1752 days


#7 posted 10-17-2014 08:51 PM

Waterlox is standing up to being punished DAILY on our island counter top.

Our gas cooktop is set into the island. AND it’s the main food prep area. So it gets all manner of hot grease spatters, meat juices, spills, slops, acidic juices like lemon, lime, hot pepper sauce. Dishes slid across it. I mean… it’s a WORKING surface. Now…. it’s WOOD… so it will get its share of little marks if you screw up, but as far as the finish? It’s wonderful! We clean it with a soapy sponge after we do dishes and then we wipe it down with a mix of vinegar and water. That gets rid of any soap-water spotting and leaves it squeaky clean.

As far as repairability…
My island top has a clipped off corner on one end. After a YEAR my wife wanted the angle changed just a little. Took the top off and out to the shop. I honestly figured I’d be refinishing the entire top. I cut the corner, rounded the edge over then I wiped down the entire top with mineral spirits to make sure there was no kitchen grease on it. Know what that did?

It CLEANED it. That’s all. So I applied 3 heavy coats to the newly cut area and feathered them lightly back into the existing finish. I was convinced that my final step would be to apply a coat to the entire top. No way that corner was going to blend after a year.

Guess what…
I was wrong. On the day I went out to do that final coat on the entire top I looked at it and couldn’t see where I’d feathered it. I brought my wife out. We moved it into different light. We took it outside. She said, “C’mon…. did you really cut it or are you messing with me?”

SHE couldn’t see the blend either. So we put it back on. :)

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JUC

116 posts in 1356 days


#8 posted 10-22-2014 02:53 PM

thanks for all the help and information.
Jeffrey

-- If no one will ever see it, all the more reason to make it right

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