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Forum topic by 3285jeff posted 10-16-2014 07:01 PM 1795 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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3285jeff

152 posts in 1178 days


10-16-2014 07:01 PM

I have a craftsman tablesaw,,,it is a old one and im trying to restore it,,,,i have cleaned the top with murtic acid,,,wire brushes and sandpaper to remove the rust which i have done,,,,but reguardless of what i put on it the rust keeps coming back,,,,i have put oil,,,grease,,,even put johnson wax on it and the rust comes back,,,i really dont want to paint it,,,i would just like to find something to stop the rust,,,,can anyone help!!!!


15 replies so far

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

2657 posts in 2644 days


#1 posted 10-16-2014 07:11 PM

Maybe try using some boeing T9 spray, let it dry, buff out the film, then apply a good coat of paste wax. Repeat occasionally as needed. Are you in a really humid environment?

-- Allen, Colorado

View Gunslinger's profile

Gunslinger

17 posts in 848 days


#2 posted 10-16-2014 07:23 PM

Try using paste floor wax with cannuba oil.( I think that is how it is spelled)

-- AL, Alabama

View JayT's profile

JayT

4772 posts in 1671 days


#3 posted 10-16-2014 07:41 PM

You are first going to have to get rid of all traces of the muriatic acid anywhere near and all the fumes. The acid will remove rust, but the fumes also cause rust, no matter what you do or how you try to protect the metal. In the hardware stores where I work, any steel within ten feet of the bottles of muriatic acid rusts, even though the acid is still factory sealed. It will penetrate any protective finish—this even includes epoxy paint on shelves. Not sure of the chemistry behind it, but it happens. I’d think it’d be even worse after a container has been opened.

You’ll need to remove any containers of the muriatic, air out your shop really well and find a way to neutralize the surfaces before you have any chance of winning this battle. Keep in mind that cast iron is a bit porous, so there may be traces of the acid still in the top.

Good luck.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

611 posts in 1021 days


#4 posted 10-16-2014 07:42 PM

I don’t understand why the rust comes back if you’ve done what you say. Is the saw in an extremely wet environment?

Edit: I see JayT’s response and that make sense.

View lepelerin's profile

lepelerin

478 posts in 1785 days


#5 posted 10-16-2014 08:32 PM

View rantingrich's profile

rantingrich

372 posts in 805 days


#6 posted 10-16-2014 09:01 PM



I have a craftsman tablesaw,,,it is a old one and im trying to restore it,,,,i have cleaned the top with murtic acid,,,wire brushes and sandpaper to remove the rust which i have done,,,,but reguardless of what i put on it the rust keeps coming back,,,,i have put oil,,,grease,,,even put johnson wax on it and the rust comes back,,,i really dont want to paint it,,,i would just like to find something to stop the rust,,,,can anyone help!!!!

- 3285jeff

I have the very exact same problem with my Ridgid R4512, which is the bastardized brother of the newer searsv 10 inch TS.

I would taken lacquer thinner and have sanded off any light rust I might see. Clean it good and put two coats of Johnsons paste wax, but still if I don’t use the saw for a week or two I will still get some rust.

Heres what you can do and see if you like it.. I DO NOT! but it wont rust..

Clean it good and use a solvent like lacquer thinner or Denatured Alcohol. Then spray it lightly with SHELLAC.. Let it dry real good then wax it.

IT WON’T RUST, BUT you wont have that great magic like GLIDE you are use to with just WAX.

I am gunna strip it all off this weekend and try just wax again. Here are a few suggestion I have been told one here I am gunna try. Use a DEHUMIDIFIER all the time. Wally World has cheap ones. Also one guy said when you wax it give it two or three coats and use a power buffer

I will use the Shellac in a case of where I might not be suing the saw for weeks at a time.

-- Rich

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rantingrich

372 posts in 805 days


#7 posted 10-16-2014 09:04 PM

OH gess I just read about the muratic Acid. Gawd guy Never get Muratic any where near Metal!

-- Rich

View tefinn's profile

tefinn

1222 posts in 1897 days


#8 posted 10-16-2014 09:41 PM

Muriatic acid is just another name for hydrochloric acid, very corrosive to metal. You’ll need to neutralize the acid first before protecting the saw table. The best neutralizer I’ve found is baking soda mixed with a bit of water to make a paste. Spread it onto the table and really rub it in. let it dry and scrub it off with a Scotch-brite pad changing pads as needed. After you have it clean and shiney, just coat it with a good silicone free paste wax. This is all I use on the bare metal of any tool restorations.

-- Tom Finnigan - Measures? We don't need no stinking measures! - Hmm, maybe thats why my project pieces don't fit.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4448 posts in 3421 days


#9 posted 10-16-2014 09:57 PM

First mistake is using muriatic acid. That stuff will take the hide off a dinosaur, bricks, anvils, old saws, blah, blah.
Neutralize the acid with baking soda. Do you remember high school chemistry?
The environment will still have acid fumes, so ya need to ventilate big time.
Wax, oil, wax, oil, wax, oil.
Where did you get the idea to use chemical napalm/acid?
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115201 posts in 3037 days


#10 posted 10-16-2014 10:32 PM

Muriatic acid might work for concrete but it’s not good for metal surfaces. now you have the fun of trying to get the remnants of the acid off. I just use a random orbital sander and auto rubbing compound with a scotch Brite pad underneath the sander to clean metal surfaces this removes dirt,and rust very very. after using the rubbing compound I just use a soft rag under the ROS to clean up the excess compound and more rags to apply the wax and then buff it out,all done with the ROS. This works very well.
The secret to using say automotive wax or even floor wax is not to use to much,just enough to cover the surface then let it dry(it usually turns into a white haze when dry) and then buff it out.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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3285jeff

152 posts in 1178 days


#11 posted 10-17-2014 11:10 AM

thank you all for your responces,,I never knew that about murtic acid,,i will do as you said about mixing water a nd baking soda to clean it again,,,i was at my wits end trying to figure out what to do,,lol,,or what I was doing wrong,,

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2527 days


#12 posted 10-17-2014 12:45 PM

I use Bo-Shield works great.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

805 posts in 2310 days


#13 posted 10-17-2014 09:50 PM

+1 Boshield & pastewax

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View buildingmonkey's profile

buildingmonkey

242 posts in 1008 days


#14 posted 10-20-2014 02:04 AM

After you get the acid neutralized, maybe you would like to copy my system. I noticed that you never get rust on the painted parts of machines, so I tried some poly on my machine tops. Tired of rust, use wax and boeshield, with lousy results, so I wiped them down with mineral spirits to remove the wax, etc, and tried a coat of poly. Have been rust free for a year. The planer is getting the finish worn off, so will have to recoat it soon. Heat and cool, only when working, so that is probably the problem. If you heat and cool your shop constantly, year around, you probably wont have a rust problem. My problem is with being tight with my money, and only want to spend money on heat /cool when I’m working in the shop. Hence, my solution.

-- Jim from Kansas

View bkseitz's profile

bkseitz

294 posts in 770 days


#15 posted 10-27-2014 10:49 AM

I have a 20+ year old Craftsman 113 out in a metal barn which is my workshop. I live in Washington State—known for its humidity :-) Had to resort the top a year ago I purchased the Boeshield Tool Care kit it has done a great job…so far no return of rust after initial clean-up

-- bkseitz, Washington "if everything is going well, you've obviously overlooked something"

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