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Lathe Headstock heats up. Highest gear doesn't get up to speed.

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Forum topic by ThorinOakenshield posted 10-15-2014 12:54 PM 785 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ThorinOakenshield

103 posts in 1564 days


10-15-2014 12:54 PM

Topic tags/keywords: lathe lathe maintenance

I have a 10in delta midi lathe (46-250 I believe). I’ve noticed the headstock including hand-wheel become very warm even when turning small stuff. Also just recently that when I set the belts to produce the highest speed (3700 rpm, this is a six speed lathe) that the chuck/spur/dead-center (whatever is in there) does not get up to speed. Just turns really slow.

So, I am thinking my motor is going bad. Except that the heat on the headstock makes me think I am missing some lubrication. Has anyone dealt with this before? If I need lube, what kind? Where does it go? Pictures are super helpful.

Thanks.

-- -Thorin Oakenshield, King Under the Mountain


6 replies so far

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Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1195 days


#1 posted 10-15-2014 02:01 PM

Are you getting any squealing noises from a loose belt? Remove the belt tension, and listen to the motor running at full speed. Even if you know nothing about stuff like this, you should be able to notice the sounds the motor makes if it running ok.
What you described, it sounds more like a bad bearing in the headstock to heat it up. If it’s a new lathe, the bearings need to have a break in period.
What do you think is very warm to the touch? A human can get burned with just 139°f water. At least, that’s what has been determined to be maximum temp for water heaters should produce. Bearings, on the other hand, start having heat related problems at well over 200-300° and up until they melt. If the head stock gets too hot to touch, then you might have some problems, but if it’s warmer than the surrounding environment, your shop, it’s nothing to worry about. ........ Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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ThorinOakenshield

103 posts in 1564 days


#2 posted 10-15-2014 02:54 PM

No squealing of any sort. The motor seems to hum along just fine. And gets up to speed on the 2nd highest setting.

Can I grease some parts to make run better?

-- -Thorin Oakenshield, King Under the Mountain

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johnstoneb

2145 posts in 1638 days


#3 posted 10-15-2014 03:05 PM

Sound like a bearing in the headstock is going bad. Remove the belt try to turn by hand should turn smoothly and easily. If it feels a little rough or grinding replace the bearing or bearings.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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ThorinOakenshield

103 posts in 1564 days


#4 posted 10-15-2014 03:09 PM

How do I replace the bearings? Is it expensive? Can you send me a diy link or video?

-- -Thorin Oakenshield, King Under the Mountain

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ThorinOakenshield

103 posts in 1564 days


#5 posted 10-15-2014 03:39 PM

I found the part# here: http://www.1800toolrepair.com/schematics/46-250_TYPE_2.pdf

Not too bad. I guess they are just to rings that you pull out and push in gently.

-- -Thorin Oakenshield, King Under the Mountain

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ThorinOakenshield

103 posts in 1564 days


#6 posted 10-22-2014 01:02 PM

Solved!! I bought the replacement bearings… when i went to take off the hand wheel I noticed the two screws that hold it in place had slipped allowing the hand wheel to rub against the headstock. Something I didn’t ever consider would be happening. I replaced the bearings anyway, they are slightly more stable than the ones that were on there.

-- -Thorin Oakenshield, King Under the Mountain

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