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Forum topic by customturnedwork posted 10-15-2014 12:48 AM 1222 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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customturnedwork

43 posts in 1003 days


10-15-2014 12:48 AM

Topic tags/keywords: dust collector problems motor noise bearings overheating question

I have a 1HP King Dust Collector that was given to me by a friend. He was upgrading because this one was broken and he needed a larger system; this dust collector was overheating and shutting off, he thought it was bearing problems. I decided to fix it myself so I pulled off the impeller and opened the motor. One of the the bearings was very stiff and gritty so I pulled it and replaced it. The other was nice and smooth. The whole shaft assembly sounds nice when it is spun out of the motor housing; when it is placed in it makes more sound. When the DC is turned on it is loud and has a high speed sort of rattling sound pulses on and off sometimes. Is the other bearing worn and faulty (it does turn easily; maybe to easily?) or can you think of other possible problems?


16 replies so far

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Rick M

7923 posts in 1845 days


#1 posted 10-15-2014 02:41 AM

Is it more of a warbling sound or a mechanical sound? Possibly a damaged impeller.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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customturnedwork

43 posts in 1003 days


#2 posted 10-15-2014 03:21 AM

The best I can describe the sound is that of a rattle coming up the shaft. It is a rattle that starts quiet and grows loud in about 3sec.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4230 posts in 1664 days


#3 posted 10-15-2014 03:56 AM

Fresh bearings won’t spin freely.. there is some resistance due to the grease. In addition, most motor bearings are replaced as a pair, so generally if one is bad, then the other one is also, or will be soon. Replace the other bearing.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1592 posts in 2324 days


#4 posted 10-15-2014 04:20 AM

+1 for replace other bearing.

Was electrician in Navy. We trained to ALWAYS replace both bearings whenever we opened a motor. Just didn’t make sense to go to the point of disassembling a motor and not replace the most common point of failure.

Good Luck!

Be Careful!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

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timbertailor

1592 posts in 889 days


#5 posted 10-15-2014 02:04 PM

Make sure the bearing are seated properly and that they can not move around on their saddles.

Nice to see someone working on a common problem. Good luck.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

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customturnedwork

43 posts in 1003 days


#6 posted 10-15-2014 02:37 PM

The original pulsing sound has stopped now that the impeller has been mounted. My thought is that the pulsing was the centrifugal switch turning on and off to regulate the speed because there was no load on the motor. The motor was gaining to much speed so the centrifugal switch was activated; the motor slowed and centrifugal switch deactivated; motor sped up etc. Now with the impeller installed there is a load on the motor so it doesn’t reach to high of a speed; thus the pulsing noise has stopped. Could I be correct in this assumption?

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customturnedwork

43 posts in 1003 days


#7 posted 10-15-2014 05:43 PM

Now that the dust collector is all together it seems to be working fine. It is running with no extra noise; there is one problem though. After ~15min of running it “overheats” and shuts off. The motor is warm but not very hot.

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customturnedwork

43 posts in 1003 days


#8 posted 10-15-2014 05:49 PM

I have been reading on this issue and think it may be because I running it with unrestricted air intake. Am I correct?

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customturnedwork

43 posts in 1003 days


#9 posted 10-15-2014 11:33 PM

This sound problem seems to be going on and off. At the time of my last post the DC was running perfeclty; no excess noise, etc. Now the noise issue has restarted. I tend to think it is the bearings again.

Here is a sound recording of the DC:

Please click here

Thanks for all your help; you guys are great!

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 951 days


#10 posted 10-16-2014 02:35 AM

The noise or vibration getting loud then going away can sometimes have something to do with resonance. My jointer does te same thing. Don’t really know what to do about it.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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customturnedwork

43 posts in 1003 days


#11 posted 10-16-2014 03:07 AM



The noise or vibration getting loud then going away can sometimes have something to do with resonance. My jointer does te same thing. Don t really know what to do about it.

- TheFridge

Thanks for your response. This is another possible solution that I’m inclined to agree with because it is not a constant noise; sometimes it is there and other times not.

One thing that this theory does not solve is the overheating problem. I’ve tried restricting airflow to the DC, but it still shuts off after 15min of use. The motor is not that warm – I’m not sure what the temperature should be after running for that time. How warm should a Dust Collector motor be after 15min of use? Could it be that “auto turn off when overheating” (what ever the official name for that is) is not responding correctly?

Please give feedback.

View Crank50's profile

Crank50

173 posts in 1041 days


#12 posted 10-16-2014 03:10 AM

A fan has a design load. The inlet has a specific size to allow the most air flow the motor can stand.
If someone increased the inlet size, then that would cause the motor to overheat.
Same thing on the outlet. Too little resistance will result in greater air flow and when air flow increases so does the horse power requirement. If it increases to a point greater than the horsepower available the motor will over heat.

I never read where you replaced the second bearing. Maybe I missed it, but they should be replaced as a set. Always.

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customturnedwork

43 posts in 1003 days


#13 posted 10-16-2014 03:22 AM

I have ordered the second bearing and am going to replace both bearings. Could you clarify your statement about the inlet/outlet size. How should that info affect the way I’m using the DC? I didn’t entirely understand what you were getting at. Could you also comment on the “resonance” theory? Would “resonance” be a problem with no hose? I’ve heard it is usually a problem with long sections of corrugated pipe.

Thanks
Benjamin Hall

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crank49

3981 posts in 2436 days


#14 posted 10-19-2014 06:59 PM


I have been reading on this issue and think it may be because I running it with unrestricted air intake. Am I correct?

- customturnedwork


This implied someone had enlarged the inlet. Maybe not. Just commented on the effect of inlet/outlet size to be something to look out for.

Many people assume a fan that is choked down is working harder than one with free air flow. The opposite is true.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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customturnedwork

43 posts in 1003 days


#15 posted 10-20-2014 02:22 PM

Sorry for the misunderstanding. I was just running it without any hoses attached.

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