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Forum topic by MissouriOutdoors88 posted 10-12-2014 10:53 PM 1183 views 0 times favorited 28 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MissouriOutdoors88

334 posts in 806 days


10-12-2014 10:53 PM

So I marked over a dozen walnuts in a section of my property yesterday. Most averaged about 16 inches across. Many didn’t have a limb until more than 20 feet up. Next week, I’m going to start taking some to the mill. I think I want to just saw them live edge right now. Probably 2 inches thick and 8 feet long. I don’t want to make a mistake if there’s more demand or if I would have more building options if I sawed them a different thickness. Also, is there a minimum width for those wanting veneers? Here’s a pic of one of them. This one almost 18” wide.

Also, thank you everyone so much for all the help. I honestly don’t know I would be nearly this informed on everything without yalls help!

-- I'm an aspiring woodworker with a degree in Biology.


28 replies so far

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Dallas

3599 posts in 1955 days


#1 posted 10-12-2014 11:04 PM

I think those are young trees. You’ll see a lot of white wood and not a lot of heartwood. You’ll also find that the bark is an inch to an inch and a half thick. 16” log minus 2×1.5” bark equals 13”, minus 1.5” of young white wood equals 2×1.5- 13” equals 10”. Then there is the pith,Whe I was running a mill I couldn’t take anything closer than 4” to the pith. You may have different criteria. I sliced off another inch for my FiL on each side. He kiln dried it and sometimes got some great wood, other times it would swell, crack, buckle and sway.

I had to take down a disease tree (black walnut), last year, and between the pith, the white wood and the bark I got a maximum of an 8” slab and at the pith got a 2X5 on each side.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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MissouriOutdoors88

334 posts in 806 days


#2 posted 10-12-2014 11:20 PM

Well my brother just cut down a walnut that was about 14 inches wide total. To my surprise, there was only about 3/4 inch of white wood on each side. The bark was actually relatively thin.

Can you explain the issue with the pith for me? Do most people who do live edge slabs try to avoid it?

-- I'm an aspiring woodworker with a degree in Biology.

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MissouriOutdoors88

334 posts in 806 days


#3 posted 10-12-2014 11:23 PM

What I should ask is why did you avoid a whole 4 inches away from it?

-- I'm an aspiring woodworker with a degree in Biology.

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1777 days


#4 posted 10-13-2014 12:00 AM

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MissouriOutdoors88

334 posts in 806 days


#5 posted 10-13-2014 12:06 AM

According to that article a 16-18 inch walnut is logable. Still Confused on the pith issue.

-- I'm an aspiring woodworker with a degree in Biology.

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Dallas

3599 posts in 1955 days


#6 posted 10-13-2014 12:11 AM

No problem, save the pith as a whole slab. It’s your tree.

I do know that I can show you pictures of the pith swelling and shrinking and cracking much more than your solid wood.

Have fun.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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MissouriOutdoors88

334 posts in 806 days


#7 posted 10-13-2014 12:13 AM

Dallas I wasn’t trying to come off rude I was just confused why you avoided it by 4 inches. I didn’t think it was that wide. I’m here to learn.

-- I'm an aspiring woodworker with a degree in Biology.

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2158 days


#8 posted 10-13-2014 12:21 AM

MO88, The pith tends to want to split or develop cracks so most people try to avoid it. I get more requests for 1” thick slabs than 2” (and they dry faster).

Having said that, I will add that walnut is one of the most “user friendly” woods: not bad to split, cup, warp, etc when drying.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Dallas

3599 posts in 1955 days


#9 posted 10-13-2014 12:22 AM

By the way, the link that was posted is only for veneer as far as I can tell, even though at the bottom it states, “Or”.

Actually, I wasn’t trying to be snarky either. I have learned that trying to convince someone that something is right is pretty much futile.

I prefer to give information as I know it and if I am proven to be wrong I will apologize and change my assessment for the next answer.

In Missouri, you may only get 3/4” white, young wood. That is still 1 1/2” total, minus what ever you want to accept for pith, if at all, and minus whatever the bark thickness is.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1944 days


#10 posted 10-13-2014 12:28 AM

I would saw it a combination of thicknesses. 4/4 (1 1/8” rough sawn) and 9/4 (2 3/8” rough sawn). Saw the thick stock from the best parts of the log. It is hard to sell low grade thick lumber. The low grade will sell better as 4/4 stock. Easier to work around any defects.

You could saw some of thick stock with the live edge. I would square edge the 4/4.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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MissouriOutdoors88

334 posts in 806 days


#11 posted 10-13-2014 12:34 AM

Thanks. I see what you’re saying. My thought was just live edging the whole thing and I could resaw it later if I wanted. But then again it’s already at the mill so why not get it squared right away. I’ll avoid the very center of the pith. I think what I’ll do is one log all live edges and the other cut into square lumber.

-- I'm an aspiring woodworker with a degree in Biology.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1777 days


#12 posted 10-13-2014 12:44 AM

Unless there’s a compelling reason to cut them know I think I’d let them grow a few more years.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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summerfi

3328 posts in 1155 days


#13 posted 10-13-2014 01:03 AM

^+1 to that.
When they’re standing they’re like money in the bank, and you’re collecting interest on your investment every year.

-- Bob, Missoula, MT -- Rocky Mountain Saw Works http://www.rmsaws.com/p/about-us.html

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MissouriOutdoors88

334 posts in 806 days


#14 posted 10-13-2014 01:10 AM

There’s a lot of other small ones there that will take their place. I just want to get
Some nice lumber to work with. I’m also glad I have a ton of big eastern redcedars to work with.

-- I'm an aspiring woodworker with a degree in Biology.

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MissouriOutdoors88

334 posts in 806 days


#15 posted 10-13-2014 01:11 AM

Maybe I’ll only take a couple down at first and see if it’s worth it.

-- I'm an aspiring woodworker with a degree in Biology.

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