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drywall 2 car garage ceiling: type-x or type-c ?

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Forum topic by Holbs posted 10-09-2014 12:31 AM 1125 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Holbs

1377 posts in 1495 days


10-09-2014 12:31 AM

The original ceiling was 5/8” 4’x8’ gypsum type-x fire rated drywall, 15 boards. I removed all of it due to wanting to insulated, run wires, and too many damaged areas. I’m ready to re-install before snow starts a coming. Someone mentioned the new stuff called type-C: better fire rating at 1/2” than the fire-x at 5/8” by far, 3% lighter (whoopie do), and stronger (due to more fibers). So now I’m undecided to go with the original 5/8” type-x or newer 1/2” type-c. I can only get 4’x12’ in the type-c for $16 a sheet, not 4’x8’. That means less taping & mudding, less screws. I’ll be using a drywall lift either way, so physically installation does not matter between the 2.

Anyone know of pro’s and con’s between 5/8” 4’x8’ type-x and 1/2” 4’x12’ type-c ?

oh… and this is not from Home Depot but AMS chain. Delivery is just $60 vs HD $100.

-- Yes, my profile picture is of a Carpenter Bee! The name is derived from the Ancient Greek "wood-cutter"


6 replies so far

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jmartel

6575 posts in 1615 days


#1 posted 10-09-2014 12:34 AM

What’s the cost per square foot of each? And do you know if code in your area specifies a minimum thickness or just a minimum fire rating? A 4×12 will be more difficult to move around since it’s 50% more weight than a 4×8, something to consider.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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Holbs

1377 posts in 1495 days


#2 posted 10-09-2014 12:36 AM

J.. I just started today after visiting AMS. I have to call the county code office to ask them that question of minimum thickness (tho, i would imagine long lasting drywall would outweigh thickness?).
I do not see an issue of weight since using a drywall lift. never used one before, so could be wrong.
The 4’x8’ 5/8” type-x was $10.50, 4’x12’ type-c at $17.50 i believe. Was driving on speakerphone when he told me cost per square foot so did not exactly pay attention to that detail :)

-- Yes, my profile picture is of a Carpenter Bee! The name is derived from the Ancient Greek "wood-cutter"

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Holbs

1377 posts in 1495 days


#3 posted 10-09-2014 12:51 AM

1. The garage shall be separated from the residence and its’ attic area by not less than 1/2-inch gypsum board applied to the
garage side. Garages beneath habitable rooms shall be separated from all habitable rooms above by not less than 5/8-inch
Type X gypsum board or equivalent. Where the separation is a floor-ceiling assembly, the structure supporting the separation
shall also be protected by not less than 1/2-inch gypsum board or equivalent. Doors to be 1 3/8” solid core or rated 20 min
———————————
good ‘ol google. I will still call the building dept to ask about type-c.

-- Yes, my profile picture is of a Carpenter Bee! The name is derived from the Ancient Greek "wood-cutter"

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7483 posts in 1472 days


#4 posted 10-09-2014 12:13 PM

Lighter, less screws, less tape and mudding. And since you’re using a drywall lift (what a lifesaver those things are) I’d go with the 1/2” for all the reasons you stated.

PROVIDING your codes will allow it.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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Grandpa

3256 posts in 2141 days


#5 posted 10-09-2014 02:50 PM

As stated it depends on the local codes. Sometimes there are codes that say 5/8 and it doesn’t matter that the 1/2 inch is better and will last longer.

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Holbs

1377 posts in 1495 days


#6 posted 10-09-2014 11:48 PM

Called the county building code folks. It can be type-c 1/2” as long as no habitat above, else it would have to be 5/8”. Now to play tetris and fit 4’x12’ sheet….

-- Yes, my profile picture is of a Carpenter Bee! The name is derived from the Ancient Greek "wood-cutter"

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