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Difficult feeding on table saw

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Forum topic by mortalwombat posted 10-08-2014 08:06 PM 1022 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mortalwombat

65 posts in 1609 days


10-08-2014 08:06 PM

Topic tags/keywords: table saw feeding buildup polystyrene ripping smooth smoothley

I haven’t had my table saw too long now, and lately I have noticed the saw being a little difficult to feed, especially when ripping. I have noticed a bit of buildup on the blade insert. I’m not exactly sure what it is. Maybe sap, or maybe paint? I used the saw to cut some polystyrene base moulding, so maybe it’s residue from that?

Either way, I’d like to clean this buildup off the saw. There’s also some buildup on the blade that I am certain is from that polystyrene. What is the recommended method for cleaning? Are there any recommendations for keeping things moving smoothly in general?


13 replies so far

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3551 posts in 1229 days


#1 posted 10-08-2014 08:15 PM

Soak it in diesel overnight and brush it clean. Wash with dish soap.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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mahdee

3551 posts in 1229 days


#2 posted 10-08-2014 08:17 PM

Soak it in diesel overnight and brush it clean. Wash with dish soap.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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mahdee

3551 posts in 1229 days


#3 posted 10-08-2014 08:23 PM

Soak in diesel overnight, brush clean and was with dish soap.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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mahdee

3551 posts in 1229 days


#4 posted 10-08-2014 08:29 PM

hmmm, triple post.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View Fettler's profile

Fettler

200 posts in 1459 days


#5 posted 10-08-2014 08:42 PM

Check that your fence is square to the blade. Binding from the blade would be might first thought. On my Unisaw i use a coat of renaissance wax to protect the top and help things glide better.

That build up is likely gum/resin/pitch and can be removed with bit/blade cleaner. I can’t remember what brand i use, maybe this one:
http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/128479/Blade-and-Bit-Cleaner-8-Ounce-Pump-Spray.aspx

-- --Rob, Seattle, WA

View OhioMike's profile

OhioMike

73 posts in 1624 days


#6 posted 10-08-2014 08:46 PM

I use Greased Lightning:
 photo KGrHqFoMFIwbdMgnhBSM2rvB5Gw60_57_zpse2c02c58.jpg

I place the blade on an old cookie sheet to contain the mess. I spray with Greased Lightning and let sit for a couple minutes. I then scrub the teeth with a brass brush but an old toothbrush would likely work almost as well.

Rinse with water then dry completely and you’re done.

Mike

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4853 posts in 2275 days


#7 posted 10-08-2014 08:53 PM

What kind of blade? Perhaps a new Diablo Thin Kerf would solve your problem.
I have had plastic that wouldn’t come off tablesaw blades. For typical cleaning of pitch and resin I use Simple Green purple.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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firefighterontheside

13459 posts in 1318 days


#8 posted 10-08-2014 08:57 PM

+3 to what mrjinx said.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View mortalwombat's profile

mortalwombat

65 posts in 1609 days


#9 posted 10-08-2014 09:37 PM

Diesel sounds like a great plan. I’ll try that and check how square the saw is. I squared it up the best I could when I first got the saw last year, but I didn’t have the most accurate measuring tools to do it so it may not have been perfectly square. It’s probably a good time to recheck everything and re-lube it all while I’m at it.

Thanks!

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7210 posts in 2837 days


#10 posted 10-08-2014 10:19 PM



I use Greased Lightning:

I place the blade on an old cookie sheet to contain the mess. I spray with Greased Lightning and let sit for a couple minutes. I then scrub the teeth with a brass brush but an old toothbrush would likely work almost as well.

Rinse with water then dry completely and you re done.

Mike

- OhioMike

I use a similar method with Greased Lightning, or 409, or Fantastic, or LA’s Totally Awesome….whatever’s around tends to work. The important step is to clean them. For really grungy blades, Freud suggests kerosene because it’s pH neutral.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2324 posts in 1759 days


#11 posted 10-08-2014 11:54 PM

Does it feed easier and cut better when you raise your blade?

View buildingmonkey's profile

buildingmonkey

242 posts in 1010 days


#12 posted 10-09-2014 12:54 AM

For the pitch buildup, the spray bit and blade spray cleaner Grizzly sellls cleans very quick. I spray it on my cutters on the jointer and planer and use a toothbrush to scrub. don’t have to wait but a few seconds before swcrubbing, much quicker than Rockler’s cleaner. You have to wait a LONG time for that stuff to work.

-- Jim from Kansas

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7210 posts in 2837 days


#13 posted 10-09-2014 10:49 AM

If the blade has been dirty for a while, it may be prematurely dull as a result. Cleaning is always a good idea, but you may want to consider sharpening or replacement depending on how good of a blade it is.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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