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Forum topic by ralbuck posted 10-06-2014 12:40 AM 840 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ralbuck

1993 posts in 1731 days


10-06-2014 12:40 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Hi All,

I need help in identifying this wood AND also help in how to get it to dry to make tabletop from it!
It had been tentatively identified as maple; although, we do NOT think it is!

The slabs are about 2-1/2 inches thick and from about 20-24 inches in diameter!

Any help and ideas are very much appreciated!
A big THANK YOU to all.

I do want to leave the live edge effect!

-- just rjR


15 replies so far

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3140 days


#1 posted 10-06-2014 12:51 AM

Looks like maple from here. Get it coated with anchor seal or latex paint ASAP to slow the splitting. It will be hard to get it dry without that check through the pith extending and a few more showing up. Plan on butterflies or epoxying to fix the cracks. I have a lot of large maple I tried to dry in the round and I doubt if it can be done without some checking. Good luck.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View hunter71's profile

hunter71

2732 posts in 2651 days


#2 posted 10-06-2014 01:40 AM

Soft Maple if it is what I think.

-- A childs smile is payment enough.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3140 days


#3 posted 10-06-2014 01:46 AM

That is all we have here on the west coast.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

691 posts in 1262 days


#4 posted 10-06-2014 01:47 AM

We call them biskets around here,not much you can do that will prevent them from checking, unless you have some special arrangement with Mother Nature.They may even cup and twist.Sorrry if I sound like a buzz kill.

View Gerry's profile

Gerry

43 posts in 796 days


#5 posted 10-06-2014 01:52 AM

Kinda big, but I was leaning toward Birch.

-- Gerry-Abbotsford BC

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4032 posts in 1816 days


#6 posted 10-06-2014 02:12 AM

Looks like maple from here.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

979 posts in 986 days


#7 posted 10-06-2014 03:03 AM

Sure, why can’t it be maple ? I see no evidence to overturn that identification. I’d have a hard time believing that bark looks like birch.

The most reliable way to make a table top out of it is to let it crack and check as it dries, then fix it and fill it as necessary. Good luck, have fun, post pictures and tell about how you did it.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 951 days


#8 posted 10-06-2014 03:11 AM

Show some leaves if possible.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Von's profile

Von

218 posts in 1678 days


#9 posted 10-06-2014 04:09 AM

Doubt it’s any sort of a Birch. Gonna toss my hat in with the “Maple” crowd. I’ve got some Silver Maple logs up in my workshop right now, and the bark patterns and color are identical to what you have there. Fun stuff to work with, but that bark gets real tough as it dries out. (aka, practically super glues itself onto the wood)

View Grumpymike's profile

Grumpymike

1917 posts in 1780 days


#10 posted 10-06-2014 12:39 PM

The bark looks more like Alder to me and as you are in Oregon where lots and lots of Alder grows …
The Acer maple that grows in the Pacific Northwest has a much rougher bark, kinda like oak.
Well that’s my thought … (I will be at the whipping post at noon on Tuesday.)

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it. ... Surprise Az.

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

486 posts in 1085 days


#11 posted 10-06-2014 03:13 PM

I’m going to second grumpymike. If you are in Oregon there is a decent chance that is red alder. The bark looks right and so does the wood. 20” diameter is on the big side, but could probably be found.

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2410 posts in 1979 days


#12 posted 10-06-2014 04:02 PM

I once bought a load of something called Pacific Coast Maple. A maple that was dense and a bit more grainy. Looked a lot like that.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View ToyMakingDad's profile

ToyMakingDad

58 posts in 1476 days


#13 posted 10-06-2014 04:45 PM

If you are willing to sacrifice a 1×3x6ish sample, you could try the Center for Wood Anatomy Research. I used the service for the first time over the summer. You mail them a sample (up to five per year) and they will identify genus. No cost outside of shipping. I sent two sample and it took about 6 or 7 weeks to get an answer by mail.

Center for Wood Anatomy Research
USDA Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory
One Gifford Pinchot Dr.
Madison, WI 53726-2398

-- Toy Making Dad, Northern Virginia, http://toymakingdad.blogspot.com

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3599 posts in 1952 days


#14 posted 10-06-2014 05:03 PM

To dry without cracking they use to soak logs in ocean so they could make masts out of them. Sometimes a year, sometimes more, I don’t know how long they took to dry when removed from the salt water.

I learned about this technique a short time ago while I was learning to make a maritime flagpole.
This was of interest to me because of other people asking about cutting those rounds.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3140 days


#15 posted 10-06-2014 10:39 PM



The bark looks more like Alder to me and as you are in Oregon where lots and lots of Alder grows …
The Acer maple that grows in the Pacific Northwest has a much rougher bark, kinda like oak.
Well that s my thought … (I will be at the whipping post at noon on Tuesday.)

- Grumpymike

I have seen maple bark like that and had to look for leaves to tell the difference. Alder will turn red when it is cut.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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