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Gripper push block system on textured surfaces

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Forum topic by Paul Bucalo posted 10-03-2014 04:18 PM 1732 views 0 times favorited 38 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Paul Bucalo

626 posts in 826 days


10-03-2014 04:18 PM

Topic tags/keywords: gripper tablesaw question help tools

I have a Skilsaw 3410-02 with a heavily textured cast-aluminum top. Does anyone have experience with using a Gripper push block on this kind of surface? I am thinking it will not glide well, possibly be binding. I don’t want to invest in such an expensive system if it won’t work on this kind of table saw top.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA


38 replies so far

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3025 posts in 1264 days


#1 posted 10-03-2014 04:24 PM

Put some wax on the top.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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Paul Bucalo

626 posts in 826 days


#2 posted 10-03-2014 04:36 PM



Put some wax on the top.

- CharlesA

Thanks for the suggestion, Charles. I’ve been reluctant to wax the top because of it’s sandpaper-like surface texture. I was hoping more for first-hand experience in how the Gripper system works on this kind of surface.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

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CharlesA

3025 posts in 1264 days


#3 posted 10-03-2014 04:43 PM

Something doesn’t make sense here. The pebbled surface is supposed to make it easier to slide things on it—it should not be sandpaper-like. A sticky surface is dangerous on a table saw.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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Paul Bucalo

626 posts in 826 days


#4 posted 10-03-2014 05:07 PM


Something doesn t make sense here. The pebbled surface is supposed to make it easier to slide things on it—it should not be sandpaper-like. A sticky surface is dangerous on a table saw.

- CharlesA

Here are two close-ups of the textured top of the table saw. Note two things: 1) the contrast in smoothness between the painted metal blade insert and the adjoining top, and; 2) The depth of the embossed company branding (on either side of the blade) that add drag and potential other issues, especially with the roughness of the surface.

I kid you not: it takes some force to slide a 2×4 through the blade on this table. How does it feel on the finger tips? Like 120 sandpaper.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

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CharlesA

3025 posts in 1264 days


#5 posted 10-03-2014 05:21 PM

If it takes effort to slide wood on your table, wax it whether you use a grr-ripper or not.

Most of us use some kind of lubricant/wax on our cast iron TS tables.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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IHRedRules

92 posts in 942 days


#6 posted 10-03-2014 05:21 PM

Immediately stop what you are doing an go buy a better table saw. It is not worth losing appendages/limbs because of a cheap saw that has an unsafe top on it. If it is new, contact customer service. That top looks like a multi-million dollar pay day for folks that donated a few fingers to their cause. No, grippers won’t work with that, probably only make it worse, as you may put more down pressure on the piece you are cutting, making it that much harder to push.

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Paul Bucalo

626 posts in 826 days


#7 posted 10-03-2014 05:30 PM



If it takes effort to slide wood on your table, wax it whether you use a grr-ripper or not.

Most of us use some kind of lubricant/wax on our cast iron TS tables.

- CharlesA

I am aware that wax is used. I just know from experience that wax won’t be enough on a surface as rough as this one has. I’m tempted to dry sanding and polishing. Once I do I will have to keep on top of maintaining the bare aluminum. My worry in taking paper and compound to this is keeping the top relatively flat. I’m better off building a new saw around this, making the top out of quality plywood. It would also solve the zero-insert issue this model has. Then I can wax the top, like everyone else does. :)

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

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CharlesA

3025 posts in 1264 days


#8 posted 10-03-2014 05:33 PM

If wax isn’t enough, then I’d follow Red’s suggestion.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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Paul Bucalo

626 posts in 826 days


#9 posted 10-03-2014 05:36 PM


Immediately stop what you are doing an go buy a better table saw. It is not worth losing appendages/limbs because of a cheap saw that has an unsafe top on it. If it is new, contact customer service. That top looks like a multi-million dollar pay day for folks that donated a few fingers to their cause. No, grippers won t work with that, probably only make it worse, as you may put more down pressure on the piece you are cutting, making it that much harder to push.

- IHRedRules

I agree with your assessment on the Gripper. I asked just in case someone has luck with it. As far as going out and getting a new saw, that will happen someday, probably a used hybrid or small cabinet saw that’s in good shape. Until then, I have work to do. I’m a relative novice to woodworking, but a seasoned user of machinery from several different venues. I am more cautious than most in using tools, especially power tools, which is why I haven’t done a lot on this saw to this point. I think it’s time to build a new saw from this one and get past all the safety issues and irregularities once and for all.

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

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CharlesA

3025 posts in 1264 days


#10 posted 10-03-2014 05:37 PM

Btw, I wouldn’t build a saw around that universal motor. You can sell that babe and find a used craftsman 113 for near the same cost. Then you’re at least starting from cast irrelevant n top, available ZCIs, etc.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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Paul Bucalo

626 posts in 826 days


#11 posted 10-03-2014 05:54 PM



Btw, I wouldn t build a saw around that universal motor. You can sell that babe and find a used craftsman 113 for near the same cost. Then you re at least starting from cast irrelevant n top, available ZCIs, etc.

- CharlesA

In theory, you’re correct. In my reality, I will run out of time first. I live in the middle of nowhere. Deals in my area are slim pickings and there isn’t the funds to buy new again. Besides, what fun I would have in making something. It’s in my nature. ;)

-- -- Paul Bucalo, Norwich NY USA

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retfr8flyr

327 posts in 1135 days


#12 posted 10-03-2014 06:47 PM

If you are stuck with that saw then I would try a and sand the table surface to get it smoother. As stated the last thing you want on a table say is for the surface to not allow things to slide easily. You could take a ROS and go over the top until you get it smooth, then use steel and get it smoother and then wax it well. I don’t care how safety cautious you are, a sticking table top is a recipe for disaster.

-- Earl

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mahdee

3554 posts in 1234 days


#13 posted 10-03-2014 06:57 PM

You have a few choices here:
1- get a 40-80 grid sharpening stone, but some oil om the surface and work out those pits. If you don’t have a stone, protect the electrical with plastic or remove the top and use a concrete cap or block with water.

2- Grinder with a grinding sand paper; start with 40 and work your way up. Be careful, those sand papers can eat the top faster than you think

-- earthartandfoods.com

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mahdee

3554 posts in 1234 days


#14 posted 10-03-2014 06:59 PM

I would send those picture to the manufacturer and ask, “WTF??”

-- earthartandfoods.com

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NoThanks

798 posts in 995 days


#15 posted 10-03-2014 07:03 PM

contact cement a pc of laminate over the top. Far easier than any of the other solutions.

-- Because I'm gone, that's why!

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