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DW 735 13" Planer. Plane wider boards?

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Forum topic by skogie1 posted 10-02-2014 02:12 AM 1280 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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skogie1

95 posts in 824 days


10-02-2014 02:12 AM

I have some glue ups that 13.5” wide that I need to either use my belt sander to smooth out or my planer. Any one know if I can run 13.5” through a 13” planer? I know it sounds like a question with an obvious answer but…..maybe I can do it?


26 replies so far

View Chris208's profile

Chris208

237 posts in 1731 days


#1 posted 10-02-2014 02:32 AM

It’s called a 13 inch planer for a reason.

View sawdust703's profile

sawdust703

270 posts in 881 days


#2 posted 10-03-2014 01:32 AM

consider a hand planer.

-- Sawdust703

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13448 posts in 1317 days


#3 posted 10-03-2014 01:42 AM

Maybe if you squeeze the boards.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2851 posts in 2692 days


#4 posted 10-03-2014 02:11 AM

Even the new math tells me no. :-)

Raise the cutter head and measure it for yourself.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8239 posts in 2889 days


#5 posted 10-03-2014 10:49 AM

15” maybe. 13.5”? Nope.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1830 days


#6 posted 10-03-2014 11:23 AM

+1 for hand planes.

You can run a 13.5” board through a 13” planer. Cut half an inch off.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7479 posts in 1468 days


#7 posted 10-03-2014 11:48 AM

Give him a break guys. We were all newbies once.

I’m betting that skogie1 is thinking about how companies always build in a “fudge factor” and a lot of things will do MORE than they are actually are rated for. Such as 2ton jackstands will actually hold about 4 tons (hence the “fudge factor” term.

But not in this case. The 13” in this instance is a VERY TIGHT 13”. Even running a 12” board is close and you better make sure it’s going thru absolutely STRAIGHT! Dont ask me how I know this.

Oh yeah, WELCOME to LJs !

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13448 posts in 1317 days


#8 posted 10-03-2014 12:01 PM

Yeah welcome to LJ. No one was trying to make you feel bad. I thought you were kidding. I have a 12.5 Dewalt and without going to look at my planer the inky possible way would be to lift the board above the surface so it doesn’t have to go between the guides. Biggest problem is that the knives are only 12.5. I assume yours are 13”.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1830 days


#9 posted 10-03-2014 12:48 PM

Everyone’s just kidding here, but no, you’re not going to be able to do that. I also have the 12.5” DeWalt and even getting a 12.5” board through it is iffy. How long is this piece, and how bad is it? If the glue-ups are pretty good, and we’re not talking at 10-foot long glue-up, a hand plane or two will get you where you need to be. #4’s are pretty common at antique stores, and at least when I last looked, they were in the $10-$20 range (needing a little clean-up, of course).

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View Don W's profile

Don W

17959 posts in 2028 days


#10 posted 10-03-2014 12:58 PM

seriously start young, learn hand planes for more reasons than just this one, but this one will be a biggy!

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17131 posts in 2566 days


#11 posted 10-03-2014 01:14 PM

First of all,WELCOME TO LUMBERJOCKS. this is the best woodworking website I have found here on the net.

You’ll see on the planer that there are rails on the sides that are the limit of the width you can feed through it. 13” is the limit on the DW you have. But you usually have to stay shy of that for good feeding.
What I do when I have a wider piece is to put two pieces through separately , planing both to the same thickness and then join them afterwards.
After planing,I take a true up cut on both edges on the jointer and flip them with one top out and one bottom out going through the jointer so they match perfectly. Then glue and clamp them together with cross clamps and making very sure the surfaces match as you squeeze the glue out Some times I’ll clamp both side down to a table top to ensure they are flat at the joint.

Hope this helps. If you have extra with to your project, you can cut it apart and do just that.

Good luck….............Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View skogie1's profile

skogie1

95 posts in 824 days


#12 posted 10-03-2014 02:03 PM

I asked the question expecting to get a lot of sarcastic answers. Thanks for not disappointing! I actually really like the idea of squeezing the boards. I’ll have to add board squeezer to my wish list, right next to board stretcher.

Yeah, I was hoping for the “fudge factor”, but as I expected, the answer is no. I’m just going to use the belt sander as dead flatness isn’t that important here.

Jim Jakosh, your suggestion was what I was going to do before I posted the question. But, the belt sander will be fine. (I’m making a treasure box for my son’s sixth birthday. I plan to distress the box anyway so I’m not too concerned with it being dead flat.)

No insult taken gentlemen. Thanks for the “help”. ;)

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4024 posts in 1812 days


#13 posted 10-03-2014 02:06 PM

Nope, that isn’t going to work. Hand planes are your friends.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1830 days


#14 posted 10-03-2014 02:10 PM

Skogie, before I had a planer or planes, I did the belt sander thing. If you don’t have a proper means of securing the workpiece (vise/dogs) one tip I’d offer up is to clamp, or screw (I have a junky workbench) a strip of wood to the front of your bench as a stop. Use a piece slightly thinner than your workpiece. Then, just put the piece up against it and run the belt sander. The stop will keep the piece from being pushed off the bench by the motion of the belt.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2851 posts in 2692 days


#15 posted 10-03-2014 02:35 PM

Practice using the belt sander on a piece of scrap. My experience was so-so. Lots of unwanted sanding marks left behind when the sander kinda got away from me.

Good luck. Post some pics when you get it finished. I like to read the pics. :-)
Mike

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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