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Forum topic by harum posted 10-01-2014 07:41 PM 761 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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harum

216 posts in 1106 days


10-01-2014 07:41 PM

Topic tags/keywords: trim top trim trim molding curved trim

I pulled an image off the internet of a built-in bookcase with rounded shelves at the edges and rounded top and base trims (or trim molding?). Like on the photos below:

Was wondering if there are books, or any other resources, on how to make such trims? Are they made by laminating thin strips of hardwood and then cutting the beads? Or by stacking up curved beaded segments? I want to build a bookcase without corners of hardwood and showing the grain and looking for ways to make round trims.

Would greatly appreciate any suggestion. Thanks,
h.

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."


4 replies so far

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Yonak

979 posts in 984 days


#1 posted 10-02-2014 01:37 AM

The top pic looks like it could be flexible crown molding and the base could be made with bendable plywood topped with flexible trim molding.

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JAAune

1642 posts in 1780 days


#2 posted 10-02-2014 02:08 AM

The most common method for curved crown molding is to lay out a brick lamination then mill it out to make the profile. I prefer steam-bending the wood but it’s not always easy to get air-dried wood in the right species. You have to be careful using bent laminations. Cutting too much into too many of the layers can release built-in stress that will allow the curve to open back up.

There was a Fine Woodworking article somewhere that described a router table jig that could be used for complex, curved moldings like those on a grandfather clock. The technique was time consuming but effective and fairly efficient considering that expensive tools weren’t required. Commercially, special molding machines or CNC routers are used to profile curved trim.

You can see the seams in this picture of a curved piece of crown we made. It’s a good example of brickwork type glue ups.

Here’s the finished project.

The face frames were steam bent and the moldings we cut on CNC but the same could be done on a router table with the correct jig setup. The doors were purchased from Walzcraft because it was cheaper than making them in house.

To do stuff like the above…

First you need to learn how to create and work with curved pieces of wood before going onto doing more complex stuff like moldings. I studied in an apprenticeship and under Michael Fortune to learn those techniques but for those who don’t want to take classes or seek employment at a furniture shop, The Woodworker’s Guide to Bending Wood by Jonathon Benson is a good resource to start with. Reading isn’t enough though. It takes a lot of hands-on practice. Once you make a curve, how do you cut the joinery and clamp the parts together? That’s the hard part.

Yonak is likely right that the projects on the pictures are flexible, rubber moldings. They’re common in painted work but some can be stained as well.

Another option is to buy the moldings from a company with the equipment. I looked into it with Walzcraft for the above project but ended up making it in house since we do have CNC.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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JAAune

1642 posts in 1780 days


#3 posted 10-02-2014 02:17 AM

And here’s the Fine Woodworking article I referenced.

Issue #227

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View harum's profile

harum

216 posts in 1106 days


#4 posted 10-02-2014 02:19 PM

Thanks, Yonak and JAAune! Beautiful built-in, JAAune! Thank you for the reference. I understand that not painting, makes the project much more challenging; maybe I can avoid bending by cutting arches out of laminated boars…

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

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