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Forum topic by UpstateNYdude posted 09-29-2014 01:56 PM 849 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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UpstateNYdude

698 posts in 1448 days


09-29-2014 01:56 PM

Alright so yesterday for no good reason at all 2 of the shop light ballasts fried I even heard them pop. I am getting sick of them anyway because the lighting isn’t that great the bulbs are good but its just not enough. Just wondering if anyone has decided to go with regular light sockets and some type of outdoor LED bulb if that would be a better solution. I’d probably be looking at wiring around 24 or so together using 60W-100W LED equivalent bulbs, just seeing what other ideas are out there for shop lighting.

-- Nick, "Choking to death on bacon is like getting murdered by your lover." - JG


14 replies so far

View ChrisK's profile

ChrisK

1809 posts in 2547 days


#1 posted 09-29-2014 02:12 PM

The bright white LED bulbs are a little harsh for most task, but like the bright fluorescent lights they are not too bad for a work shop where you want bright lights. Make sure the lights are positioned to minimize shadows cast by yourself and other shop stuff. I have replaced one of four fixtures with cheap chinese ballasts. I am looking for alternatives in the LED world. I have see LED replacements for 48” T8 bulbs but do not have any eyes on experience with them.

Please let us know what you do and what the results are.

http://www.ledstrips8.com/ac85265v-4-feet12m-15-watt-t8-led-fluorescent-tube-light-36w-fluorescent-replacement-p-42.html

-- Chris K

View timbertailor's profile

timbertailor

1592 posts in 889 days


#2 posted 09-29-2014 02:21 PM

I bought (4) sets of florescent lights and ballasts when I first moved in about 12 years ago.

Just had to replace them all a couple of months ago. Went with the 5000K lamps. I really like the brighter, whiter, light.

I did not consider LED’s. Let us know what you learn.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4169 posts in 3207 days


#3 posted 09-29-2014 02:52 PM

Really depends if you get the lighting you need.

The LED doesn’t have to be outdoor rated, but just consider if you want a bright point of light casting shadows – or if you want to “spread” the light out across your ceiling.

If you look to the LED replacements for fluorescent – beware of the actual light output, not just the wattage.

Right now a 4 foot T8 lamp 32W (by law) has to deliver >2850 lumens.

The 15W T8 LED lamps I see are delivering only 1600 lumens. So realize up front you are getting a little more than ~1/2 the light. So the Efficacy (light/watt of energy) is about the same.

The energy SAVINGS – - is from less light. They are getting better and cheaper every year, but consider how much light you want/need to work under before you take the plunge.
25 bucks at the BORG

Keep in mind you get what you pay for – - if you buy the 7.97 2 lamp fixture from Wallyworld… you can be sure the ballast inside is not exactly top quality.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1186 days


#4 posted 09-29-2014 03:01 PM

I’m in the process of going to all LED for my shop. Using two self adhesive strips with 300 smd LEDs (~16’) from amazon. I stuck them to an 8’ strip of pine and stapled too in case the adhesive failed. Running two strips down and back on a pine board resulted in light output close to what a two bulb (40W) fluorescent fixture puts out. The power draw with two power supplies is 46W for each fixture. I have about $24 in each of these fixtures I’ve made and the only drawback is the shoddy quality of some of the power supplies I’ve received as they can burn out in as little as three minutes. Some of them are fine and not getting hardly warm at all. I’m pleased with the results and plan on replacing the rest of the fluorescent fixtures with the same when I can find time.

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timbertailor

1592 posts in 889 days


#5 posted 09-29-2014 05:14 PM

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4169 posts in 3207 days


#6 posted 09-30-2014 02:15 PM

I mentioned above, I think they don’t give enough light.

The latest ones are direct retrofits. The old ones required you to cut the wires to the ballast, and turn one end of the socket into a 110 hardwired circuit.
The new ones, run off the existing ballast, so you just replace the bulb – no wiring changes required.

If you are considering the LED route – I would buy ONE first…. and put replace one of your existing bulbs…
See if you like it before you dump a lot of money into the change.

My shop has 16 4 foot T8 lamps in a 14X21 space.

So the full changover would cost 400 dollars – and they have nominally the same lifetime as the fluorescent.

where I can go to depot and get a box of 10 Fluorescent tubes, 40% more light, for the same 24.97.

So 2.49 each X 16 is 40 bucks every 4 years

I will use the 360 dollars I save on tools and wood… or just blow it on gasoline. :-)

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View UpstateNYdude's profile

UpstateNYdude

698 posts in 1448 days


#7 posted 09-30-2014 02:46 PM

I may have been unclear in what I plan to convert to but, my plan is trade out my 12 existing shop lights with 2×32W T8 5000k lamps for 24 hard wired lamp holders with 75W 5000k LED bulbs instead, the cost is roughly the same as my initial investment but, I’ll be gaining a wider coverage area and picking up 10-20 lumens per watt with less than half the energy usage and these bulbs come with 10 year warranties.

My hope seeing as the bulbs are omni-directional is that I don’t lose a ton of light but I’ll install a couple and see what it looks like, if I don’t like it I’ll come back to the drawing board.

-- Nick, "Choking to death on bacon is like getting murdered by your lover." - JG

View Jackietreehorn's profile

Jackietreehorn

150 posts in 1404 days


#8 posted 09-30-2014 02:47 PM

I ran 4ft led t8’s in my shop. Main reason was at the time I was working for a company who manufactured them and they had some that needed reworking and couldn’t really sell. Short story is I wouldn’t have used them if I had to pay for them. I think at the time, (2009) the LEDs had a payback of around 4 years if used 24 hours a day. So even for a guy who uses shop full time the payback isn’t really worth it.

They’re the non ballast type, 4100k. Wood shop is around 11×18’ and four 4ft two bulb fixtures seem to do the trick. If doing over I’d probably do t8 or t5. Granted I haven’t checked price on the t8 LEDs in a while.

One more reason I liked the LEDs is the lower power consumption helps in my situation as the main power to the shop is pretty low, so the less draw I have the better.
 photo IMG_6216_zpsd0bc0d22.jpg

Now on a side note, the approach that bigblockyeti used above is actually a good idea. I’ve used the 300smd strips quite often from amazon. Here’s a panel I made using 3 of the amazon 300 led strips, they’re basically facing backwards firing at a white painted surface and then reflecting through 1/8” frosted white plexiglass. Crazy bright considering how they’re actually facing backwards. Another thought is if you have low hanging ceilings, the led strips would be the most unobtrusive for when you swing a full sheet of wood around.

Night shot photo IMG_3852.jpg

-- www.nobleprojects.blogspot.com

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Jackietreehorn

150 posts in 1404 days


#9 posted 09-30-2014 02:52 PM

Oh, be sure to check out http://lightingfacts.com/Products to research the products you’re looking at picking up. Do you have a link to the bulbs you’re looking at, they’re 75 watt, or 75 watt equivalent?
Cri rating is somewhat important factor too if you’re doing stain and finishing work.

-- www.nobleprojects.blogspot.com

View UpstateNYdude's profile

UpstateNYdude

698 posts in 1448 days


#10 posted 09-30-2014 02:55 PM

75W equivalents

-- Nick, "Choking to death on bacon is like getting murdered by your lover." - JG

View Jackietreehorn's profile

Jackietreehorn

150 posts in 1404 days


#11 posted 09-30-2014 03:05 PM

That’s a good brand name in LEDs. Color rendering is about where they say you need to be. Lower than 80 is fine for parking garages etc, but 80+ is where you want to be for led bulb. Maybe do a test run with one bulb to see how you like the coverage?.

-- www.nobleprojects.blogspot.com

View UpstateNYdude's profile

UpstateNYdude

698 posts in 1448 days


#12 posted 09-30-2014 04:18 PM

Yeah, I only have 9ft ceilings in my garage so they will most likely hang down out of the holder another 5-6 inches so being that its only 8.5ft I figured 75W would be good if it isn’t I’ll just shell out another $4-5 a bulb and go with the 100W.

-- Nick, "Choking to death on bacon is like getting murdered by your lover." - JG

View Lucasd2002's profile

Lucasd2002

124 posts in 817 days


#13 posted 10-02-2014 08:14 PM



Yeah, I only have 9ft ceilings in my garage so they will most likely hang down out of the holder another 5-6 inches so being that its only 8.5ft I figured 75W would be good if it isn t I ll just shell out another $4-5 a bulb and go with the 100W.

- UpstateNYdude

What kind of fixture are you using? I really need new lighting in my garage.

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UpstateNYdude

698 posts in 1448 days


#14 posted 10-02-2014 08:32 PM

I’m just going to hard wire gang boxes to the trusses in the ceiling and use regular lamp holders for the bulbs nothing special, the bulbs start in -35 degree weather so that is better then any other ballast under about $50 I’ve found.

-- Nick, "Choking to death on bacon is like getting murdered by your lover." - JG

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