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ELECTRICAL--IN A KITCHEN, can you have an elect. outlet inside a cabinet?

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Forum topic by matermark posted 09-29-2014 08:26 AM 1797 views 0 times favorited 46 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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matermark

47 posts in 812 days


09-29-2014 08:26 AM

Topic tags/keywords: kitchen electrical receptacle remodel building codes

Will this matter when it comes to building codes for kitchens, in NY state (if it matters?)

I am considering remodeling the kitchen and want to move an outlet at around 65” high behind the stove, currently with no cabinets on that wall, into a new cabinet above the [new] over-the-range microwave. I think usually these cabinets are wasted, sometimes with ducting for an exhaust fan. I’d like to make a plate rack cabinet there, and have the microwave plug in (instead of hard wiring), maybe in an outlet inside a partition at the end. I can also open the little door and plug in another appliance that may sit on the stove when the stovetop’s not in use, like the deep fryer, hand mixer, outboard motor mixer, etc.

This would involve moving an existing outlet that the gas range plugs into about 18”, and so an OTR microwave can plug into, plus other small appliances, room allowing.

Thanks for any help.

-- So economically handicapped I'm strictly on a strictly strict budget...


46 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4452 posts in 3424 days


#1 posted 09-29-2014 01:02 PM

Don’t know about your local codes, but they (recepts) are ok here. How else would ya plug in a microwave?
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1185 days


#2 posted 09-29-2014 01:08 PM

I have a receptacle in the back of the cabinet over the microwave/range vent and it was done when the house was built. This to me is far preferable than having something hardwired with just a wire poking through the wall, much cleaner.

View Earlextech's profile

Earlextech

1159 posts in 2154 days


#3 posted 09-29-2014 01:13 PM

Do it!

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "Finished"!

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7482 posts in 1471 days


#4 posted 09-29-2014 01:14 PM

Built in dishwashers are usually plugged in under the sink cabinet. And I have also seen garbage disposals so the outlet and switch are in the cabinet also

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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Blackcatbone

32 posts in 815 days


#5 posted 09-29-2014 01:15 PM

Always check with your local codes because they are the devil (mostly). It’s probably okay but they may have rules regarding exactly how it’s placed, whether the cabinet is open or has a door, the voltage, etc., etc.

-- . . . it's cheaper than therapy.

View matermark's profile

matermark

47 posts in 812 days


#6 posted 09-29-2014 01:16 PM

I think because it’s an over the range microwave surrounded by cabinets on 3 sides (top, left, right) it can be hard wired.

-- So economically handicapped I'm strictly on a strictly strict budget...

View Scott C.'s profile

Scott C.

149 posts in 1515 days


#7 posted 09-29-2014 01:18 PM

If it’s mounted flush to the wall your fine, if you want the outlet and cover to sit flush with the back of the cabinet you’d have to use a gang box extender.

-- measure twice, cut once, swear and start over.

View matermark's profile

matermark

47 posts in 812 days


#8 posted 09-29-2014 01:51 PM

Thanks everybody! Then I will mount the box flush to the wall and make the back of the cabinet open in that area and make a door for the front or a tambour.

Anybody know any code about minimum distance the surrounding wall cabs must be from the stove? I know most wall cabs go 18” above countertop but I do some canning (google Annie’s Salsa) and the pressure canner is pretty tall so was thinking 24” from stove to bottom of OTR microwave, but can the wall cabs surrounding the microwave hang lower?

-- So economically handicapped I'm strictly on a strictly strict budget...

View Woodbum's profile

Woodbum

732 posts in 2529 days


#9 posted 09-29-2014 02:01 PM

I have outlets in cabinets for microwave, range hood, cook top, dishwasher, disposal and wall oven here. I’d go for it.

-- "Now I'm just another old guy wearing funny clothes"

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

614 posts in 1025 days


#10 posted 09-29-2014 02:19 PM

Any outlet that serves counter top space in a kitchen needs to be GFCI protected per the 2011 NEC. Since you plan to leave this outlet accessible to plug in other counter top appliances if needed may make that outlet subject to the GFCI requirement.

View matermark's profile

matermark

47 posts in 812 days


#11 posted 09-29-2014 04:26 PM


Any outlet that serves counter top space in a kitchen needs to be GFCI protected per the 2011 NEC. Since you plan to leave this outlet accessible to plug in other counter top appliances if needed may make that outlet subject to the GFCI requirement.

- WhyMe


Would this be considered as such? It will be ~33” above the countertop… I’m all for safety but do they have a 4-outlet GFCI receptacle? Or can I stack 1 above another on the wall? And is the code for countertop area or entire kitchen? I would probably need one behind the stove instead of where it is now. Would a breaker be cheaper or would I do one GFCI and connect the restof the recptacles downline?

-- So economically handicapped I'm strictly on a strictly strict budget...

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4169 posts in 3206 days


#12 posted 09-29-2014 06:32 PM

They are OK here. Our dishwasher and garbage disposal both are plugged into a GFI outlet inside the undersink cabinet in the kitchen.

Also seen outlets away from water in a cabinet to handle some of the messes of all the charging stations for cordless mixers, and cellphones, and undercabinet TV’s

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3599 posts in 1951 days


#13 posted 09-29-2014 07:10 PM

Call your local inspector or permit place.

Here and in Indiana, circa 1998, a receptacle in the kitchen had to be GFCI and had to be 18” away from any water source, (even lines in the wall including waste pipes or stacks).

I forgot to mention, you are allowed to use a GFCI breaker to service your receptacles up to a certain number.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

614 posts in 1025 days


#14 posted 09-29-2014 08:04 PM

Any outlet that serves counter top space in a kitchen needs to be GFCI protected per the 2011 NEC. Since you plan to leave this outlet accessible to plug in other counter top appliances if needed may make that outlet subject to the GFCI requirement.

- WhyMe

Would this be considered as such? It will be ~33” above the countertop… I m all for safety but do they have a 4-outlet GFCI receptacle? Or can I stack 1 above another on the wall? And is the code for countertop area or entire kitchen? I would probably need one behind the stove instead of where it is now. Would a breaker be cheaper or would I do one GFCI and connect the restof the recptacles downline?

- matermark

All I can say is what NEC states. It says outlets installed to serve counter top surfaces in kitchens shall be GFCI protected, there is no distance set in the code. The cheapest way is to have the outlets protected by an upstream GFCI outlet. You can also use a double gang box with 1 GFCI outlet protecting the second outlet.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 950 days


#15 posted 09-29-2014 08:25 PM

A typical 2000w microwave just about taps out a 20A ckt. FYI.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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