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Forum topic by TDominy posted 09-28-2014 02:09 AM 910 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TDominy

110 posts in 2007 days


09-28-2014 02:09 AM

I am starting to make chairs and I am having trouble finding a drill bit that will make clean holes of a known diameter. What type of bit do you recommend as a drill bit for this work.

TIA

-- By hammer in hand, all things do stand.


13 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

8307 posts in 3112 days


#1 posted 09-28-2014 02:16 AM

What size holes?

Somebody is going to say forstner bits but they
are not really designed for use with a handheld
drill. If you can set things up in a drill press you
can get clean, flat-bottomed holes with
forstner bits.

Some chairmakers use spoon bits in a hand
brace. I have not tried it but I understand
it’s the way to go with windsor chairs.

Spoon bit advantages described:
http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/page.aspx?p=57713&cat=1,180,42337&ap=1

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

22021 posts in 1803 days


#2 posted 09-28-2014 02:27 AM

The drill bit used for pocket holes is a perfect 3/8”. A plug fits it great.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View TDominy's profile

TDominy

110 posts in 2007 days


#3 posted 09-28-2014 02:50 AM

Good point, right now I am looking for 5/8”.

-- By hammer in hand, all things do stand.

View exelectrician's profile

exelectrician

2327 posts in 1892 days


#4 posted 09-28-2014 07:30 AM

Put a forstner bit in your battery drill, and drill away, no problem, clean holes.

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1178 days


#5 posted 09-28-2014 10:58 AM

In order to help us give a usefull answer you should perhaps explain a little more about exactly you want to do.
Wich joints, wich sizes, wich angles, kind of wood, wich depth, along/across grain etc?

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View TDominy's profile

TDominy

110 posts in 2007 days


#6 posted 09-28-2014 11:53 AM



In order to help us give a usefull answer you should perhaps explain a little more about exactly you want to do.
Wich joints, wich sizes, wich angles, kind of wood, wich depth, along/across grain etc?

- kaerlighedsbamsen

This is what I am doing now. The holes into the stretchers are easy, it is the holes into the legs and top that are through holes. These legs are at 17 deg. I am doing another one now that I am still turning the legs that will be 22 deg.

-- By hammer in hand, all things do stand.

View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1399 days


#7 posted 09-28-2014 03:05 PM

Holes drilled at angles like you are describing were traditionally drilled with spoon bits. Spoon bits won’t hop around like other bits do when the wings of the bit hit the workpiece before the point, as in a brad point or forstner bit.

They were typically used in hand drills, not sure if these ones from lee valley can go in a power drill. You’ll have to experiment a bit, but it would be worth buying one to see what you can do with it.

Good Luck

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

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TDominy

110 posts in 2007 days


#8 posted 09-28-2014 03:32 PM

Not sure why the photo did not show up in my last post.

-- By hammer in hand, all things do stand.

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TDominy

110 posts in 2007 days


#9 posted 09-28-2014 03:35 PM



Holes drilled at angles like you are describing were traditionally drilled with spoon bits. Spoon bits won t hop around like other bits do when the wings of the bit hit the workpiece before the point, as in a brad point or forstner bit.

They were typically used in hand drills, not sure if these ones from lee valley can go in a power drill. You ll have to experiment a bit, but it would be worth buying one to see what you can do with it.

Good Luck

- TheWoodenOyster

Thanks, I think I am going to get the spoon bits anyway.
I have a brace, but would like to use them in a power drill also.
What I am thinking is they might not fit in between the legs as I have been drilling the holes in the legs after I have them in the top. It is very easy to get everything to align that way.

-- By hammer in hand, all things do stand.

View Andre's profile

Andre

1022 posts in 1270 days


#10 posted 09-28-2014 03:48 PM

I would go with a end mill bit in a horizontal mortise/horizontal boring machine, before assembly!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1178 days


#11 posted 09-28-2014 06:21 PM

Nice chair!
Looks like you have got great adwise already.

One thought: If you worry about accuracy consider drilling the holes first and do the last turning after. It is easy to turn round tennons accurate.

Good luck!

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View exelectrician's profile

exelectrician

2327 posts in 1892 days


#12 posted 09-28-2014 06:23 PM

Take an old broom stick file a small flat spot at right angles to the hole you will bore, say 22 degrees and practise doing this with a hand drill twenty times.
The human brain has amazing capabilities if we just trust ourselves to just do it! The satisfaction of getting stuff right with simple tools is huge. So go ahead and – Just do it!

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

View TDominy's profile

TDominy

110 posts in 2007 days


#13 posted 09-28-2014 09:12 PM

Thanks for the advice.

I considered drilling the holes first and that would work well in the seat, but I am not sure about the legs

I am going to get a set of spoon bit just because, well just because you cannot have to many tools and they look like they will have a place in my future projects.

I guess I did not do to bad. I took the stool to work and someone bought it. I traded it for some Avon for the wife.

-- By hammer in hand, all things do stand.

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