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Forum topic by Blackcatbone posted 09-25-2014 04:34 PM 738 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Blackcatbone

32 posts in 817 days


09-25-2014 04:34 PM

Topic tags/keywords: chrome metal

Off topic here, but so many here do so many things I thought I’d ask. Does anyone know of a fairly decent home use kind of way to re-chrome/paint chrome? A friend is giving me a 6’ chrome Knoll bench, but it’s been on the porch, so rusted. I haven’t seen it yet but am assuming the upholstery is fine, just needs cleaning. I don’t know the extent of the rust yet, if it’s light surface rust, no problem, I’m a whiz at that, even touch ups aren’t too bad, and worst case scenario I can always sand the whole thing down and paint, but the closest I’ve ever found to an actual chrome is by Duplicolor, which is only so-so, so would just skip trying to recreate it and go with a coordinating color otherwise. I don’t mind spending a bit extra on it because it’s a Knoll, but only if it’s actually worth it.

-- . . . it's cheaper than therapy.


6 replies so far

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4169 posts in 3209 days


#1 posted 09-25-2014 07:10 PM

I have seen chrome spray paint at the big box stores and Autozone as you describe (duplicolor)

Might try someone over in Nashville like
http://www.chromemasters.com/

Who will chrome parts for motorcycles etc.
Would be easy if the legs and stretchers come apart, as the cost goes exponential if you need someone with a tank that can dip a single piece that large.

I would get it to your shop, snap a couple pics, then send photos to some bike shops and see what they tell you..

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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Blackcatbone

32 posts in 817 days


#2 posted 09-29-2014 12:35 PM

Thanks DrDirt. Sorry, it’s been a pretty sucky few days and just now getting back. I picked up the bench and the rust is pretty heavy so removing and sanding. The vinyl is solid but not original or in great shape, so it wouldn’t be worth rechroming. I resell but don’t do a whole lot of really high end pieces so the amount of work and money for minimal profit just aren’t worth it. I did some further research and they sold these with different finishes so I think I can turn it into a solid lower end piece and make someone with a smaller budget happy, which tends to be more my focus anyhow. I’ve actually been setting my metal pieces aside for the time being because the heat and humidity are working against me (I always have a backlog) and prefer working with wood anyhow. I’m currently wrestling with a mahogany table that’s vexing me a bit so I may be back with something about that.

-- . . . it's cheaper than therapy.

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7483 posts in 1473 days


#3 posted 09-29-2014 01:30 PM

Do a bit of Googling and you’ll see how you can do a fairly decent job on rusted chrome with Coke and tinfoil.
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Yes.. COKE and TINFOIL. Dont laugh, it works!

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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Blackcatbone

32 posts in 817 days


#4 posted 09-29-2014 03:04 PM

I actually use tinfoil and water which works really well for surface freckling, but this is pretty far gone, chrome missing in some spots, so no hope. I’ll redo vintage office chairs with chrome bases and foil is my go to. Shines it right up.

-- . . . it's cheaper than therapy.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17188 posts in 2572 days


#5 posted 10-04-2014 09:25 PM

Far gone chrome? Paint it for sure. Re-plating costs a fortune. I used to have some Chrome paint that I got at an auto store and it did a pretty good job of shining like chrome from a distance.

I just called a friend of mine who rebuilds Airstreams and he said he uses a product call All-Clad that he gets at the hobby shop. It is sprayed over a base coat of High Gloss Black Paint. He has found that the best base coat is Tomaya -a Japanese black paint.

Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Blackcatbone's profile

Blackcatbone

32 posts in 817 days


#6 posted 10-05-2014 12:36 PM

Oh it’s definitely too far gone to save the chrome. It appears water got under the cushions and sat on the metal for extended periods and there’s some pitting there and on the back sides of the frame. Fortunately the worst of it is in places that are hidden. May or may not bondo them as the cushions will hide it. I’ve got it pretty well sanded down and the visible parts are pretty smooth. I decided that rather than beating my brains out trying for perfection, and since my upholstery skills are merely okay, and the bench won’t be original anyhow, was already poorly reupholstered when I got it, I’ll do a little reinvention and work with what I’ve got. I’m going to use a filler primer to do a bit more smoothing, using an automotive stainless steel that’s got a satin sheen, as it tends to be more forgiving and covered with a heavy black velour, tufted with brushed nickel buttons as there’s no way I could replicate the piping the original had. (See below) I actually really love doing this type of thing, though, taking something that someone else would see as garbage and bringing it back to life.

Thanks for the tip though, as I’m definitely always looking for ways to improve my skills and chrome is a bugaboo.

-- . . . it's cheaper than therapy.

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